Latest Research
Gabriel Hortobagyi honored for mentoring minority researchers
Apr 10, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

WASHINGTON, DC -- Gabriel Hortobagyi, M.D., professor in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, will receive the Jane Cooke Wright Lectureship from the American Association for Cancer Research and its Minorities in Cancer Research membership group.

Internationally recognized for his clinical and translational contributions to the field of breast cancer research, Hortobagyi will receive the honor at the AACR Annual Meeting 2013 April 4-6 in Washington, D.C. His lecture focused on the importance of team science and cooperative group trials to further advance translation of basic science into progress for patients.

The AACR-MICR Jane Cooke Wright Lectureship was established in 2006 to recognize an outstanding scientist who has made meritorious contributions to the field of cancer research and who has, through leadership or by example, furthered the advancement of minority investigators in cancer research.

I'm humbled by the AACR and their Minorities in Cancer Research colleagues. To be recognized for furthering the advancement of minority investigators in cancer research is truly an honor -- all of us share a mutual dedication to breast cancer care and feel that there has never been a more exciting time for the field, Hortobagyi says. I had the distinct pleasure of knowing Jane Cooke Wright. Her myriad scientific contributions and unwavering commitment to mentoring young scientists, especially African American women, are still impactful in cancer research and the community at large.

Hortobagyi, who holds the Nellie B. Connally Chair in Breast Cancer, is the past-chair of the Department of Breast Medical Oncology and has been a member of MD Anderson's faculty since 1976. He is widely recognized for developing combined therapies for previously inoperable breast tumors, improving multidisciplinary treatment for patients with all stages of the disease and conducting clinical trials to develop treatment regimens that have become standard practices for managing breast cancer.

Dr. Hortobagyi is well-known for his groundbreaking research, his outstanding patient care and leadership in the field and at MD Anderson, said Waun Ki Hong, M.D., head of MD Anderson's Division of Cancer Medicine and vice provost of clinical research. We're proud to see him recognized for his success as a dedicated, diligent mentor to young investigators.

The lectureship is named in honor of Jane Cooke Wright, M.D., a pioneer in clinical cancer chemotherapy research who recently passed away at the age of 93. Wright, a member of the AACR since 1954, became the highest ranking black woman at a nationally recognized medical institution in 1967. She was elected this year into the inaugural class of the Fellows of the AACR Academy.

Early in his career, Hortobagyi conducted a landmark study that gave chemotherapy before surgery to breast cancer patients with locally advanced tumors that had not spread to other parts of the body. The study concluded that most large tumors could be reduced by at least 50 percent with the preoperative chemotherapy and then removed surgically. He also:

All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited ( )