XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Medical News Channel
subscribe to Medical News newsletter

Medical News

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Fewer Girls Under China's One Child Policy
Aug 19, 2006, 21:59, Reviewed by: Dr. Priya Saxena

These findings have clear implications for decisions about future population policy. A relaxation in the policy could be considered in the near future. It is unlikely that a baby boom would result, and such a change in policy might help to correct the abnormal sex ratio.

 
Since the start of the one child family policy in China, the total birth rate and preferred family size have decreased, and a gross imbalance in the sex ratio has emerged, finds a study in this week’s BMJ.

The one child family policy has been in force in China since 1979 and was intended as a short term measure. To examine the impact of this policy, researchers analysed data from the 2001 national family planning and reproductive health survey.

Data were obtained from 39,585 women aged 15-49. The total birth rate has dropped from 2.9 before the policy to 1.94 in women over 35 and 1.73 in women under 35.

Most women want small families: 35% would prefer one child, 57% preferred two, and only 5.8% more than two. The preferred number decreased with age and higher education, and was lower among women in urban areas.

The male to female ratio was 1.11 in 1980-9 but rose sharply to 1.23 in 1996-2001. The sex ratio for first births was higher in urban areas, where only one child is allowed, suggesting that some people select the sex of their child at first birth.

Over a third of women had no sex preferences. Of those who did, 72% preferred a girl and a boy, whereas 10% preferred girls (most of these were women under 25 who lived in urban areas).

It is not clear how much these demographic changes are due to the one child policy, they add. Many countries are seeing decreases in fertility rates, and neighbouring east Asian countries have some of the lowest total fertility rates in the world. Thus the fertility rate may have continued to fall even without the policy.

Likewise many other Asian countries that have declining birth rates and traditional preferences for male babies are seeing serious sex imbalances. Even without the policy, sex selective abortion would be likely to continue, although it would probably be less common.

This can only be solved by a change in attitudes towards female offspring. The finding that many younger women in urban areas now express a preference for girls provides evidence that attitudes may be changing.

These findings have clear implications for decisions about future population policy. A relaxation in the policy could be considered in the near future. It is unlikely that a baby boom would result, and such a change in policy might help to correct the abnormal sex ratio, they conclude.

An accompanying editorial discusses the impact of this policy on China’s economy.
 

- British Medical Journal, 19 August 2006 (Vol 333, No 7564)
 

bmj.com/cgi/content/full/333/7564/371

 
Subscribe to Medical News Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 



Related Medical News News

Google could help diagnose difficult medical cases
Overseas Doctors hit by new British HSMP immigration rules
Mental health problems threaten the knowledge economy
Indians among worst affected by TB in Britain
Bihar to get eight new private medical colleges
Future of sexual and reproductive health at tipping point according to global study
Profiles of serial killers have limitations
Concerns over abortion law in the US state of South Dakota
European Alcohol Strategy Threatened by Industry Tactics
Raine Study: Breastfeeding boosts mental health


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us