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Last Updated: Nov 17th, 2006 - 22:35:04

Hypertension Channel
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Latest Research : Cardiology : Hypertension

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The kidney is only part of the blood pressure problem
Apr 3, 2005, 13:11, Reviewed by: Dr.


The mice lack a receptor (AT1) to a protein called angiotensin, which regulates blood pressure. The authors provide direct evidence that actions of AT1 receptors both inside and outside the kidney each contribute to determining the level of blood pressure.


 
Abnormal blood pressure is a widespread problem thought to be triggered by changes in the kidney. More recent studies have shown that vascular function can also affect blood pressure.

In a paper appearing in the April 1 issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation, Thomas Coffman and colleagues at the Durham VA Medical Center explore the relationship between the kidney and non-kidney tissues in mice with low blood pressure.

The mice lack a receptor (AT1) to a protein called angiotensin, which regulates blood pressure. The authors provide direct evidence that actions of AT1 receptors both inside and outside the kidney each contribute to determining the level of blood pressure.

In an accompanying commentary, Michael Mendelsohn states that the findings have "important implications for the ways we diagnose and treat blood pressure disease in humans."
 

- The kidney is only part of the blood pressure problem
 

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TITLE: Distinct roles for the kidney and systemic tissues in blood pressure regulation by the renin-angiotensin system

AUTHOR CONTACT:
Thomas M. Coffman
VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA.
Phone: (919) 286-6947; Fax: (919) 286-6879; E-mail:

View the PDF of this article at: https://www.the-jci.org/article.php?id=23378

ACCOMPANYING COMMENTARY:

TITLE: In hypertension, the kidney is not always the heart of the matter

AUTHOR CONTACT:
Michael E. Mendelsohn
Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Phone: (617) 636-9370; Fax: (617) 636-1444; E-mail:

View the PDF of this article at: https://www.the-jci.org/article.php?id=24806


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