XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
  Cornea
  Cataract
  Retina
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Ophthalmology Channel
subscribe to Ophthalmology newsletter

Latest Research : Ophthalmology

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Right Parietal Cortex Plays a Critical Role in Change Blindness
Sep 4, 2005, 09:41, Reviewed by: Dr.

“Because the parietal lobe is not part of the visual cortex it was at first surprising to find that activity in the parietal lobe is critical for visual awareness. We have always known that the parietal cortex was responsible for concentrating. But it was a surprise to find out it is also important for detecting visual changes in a scene. The finding that this region of the brain has both these functions, concentration and visual awareness, explains why we can be so easily deceived by, say, a magicians’ trick. When we’re concentrating so hard on something that our processing capacity is at its limits, the parietal cortex is not available to pay attention to new things and even dramatic changes can go unnoticed. If you’re concentrating on what the magician’s left hand is doing, you won’t notice what the right hand is doing.”

 
A team of scientists at UCL (University College London) has discovered why we often miss major changes in our surroundings - such as a traffic light turning green when we’re listening to the radio. Our inability to notice large changes in a visual scene is a phenomenon often exploited by magicians - but only now can scientists put their finger on the exact part of the brain that is so often deceived.

The UCL team shows, in a research paper published in the September issue of the journal Cerebral Cortex (which goes online on 24th August) that the part of the brain called the parietal cortex, the area responsible for concentration, is also critical to our ability to detect changes. The exact critical spot lies just a few centimetres above and behind the right ear – the area many people scratch when concentrating.

Using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), the team switched off the parietal cortex part of the brain temporarily by applying magnetic stimulation to the head via a magnetic coil which
produces small electrical currents to the brain. Without help from this region of the brain, subjects failed to notice even major visual changes– in this case a change of a person’s face.

In previous experiments using brain scanning (functional magnetic resonance imaging or fMRI), the team led by Professor Nilli Lavie at the UCL Department of Psychology, discovered that detection of visual changes was not only correlated with activity in conventional visual areas of the brain but also with activity in the parietal cortex.

But, until this experiment, when the team actually switched off the parietal cortex using TMS, they didn’t know that noticing change critically depends on activity in the parietal cortex. When that region of the brain was effectively switched off, ‘change blindness’ (a failure to notice large changes in a visual scene) occurred.

Professor Lavie said: “Because the parietal lobe is not part of the visual cortex it was at first surprising to find that activity in the parietal lobe is critical for visual awareness. We have always known that the parietal cortex was responsible for concentrating. But it was a surprise to find out it is also important for detecting visual changes in a scene. The finding that this region of the brain has both these functions, concentration and visual awareness, explains why we can be so easily deceived by, say, a magicians’ trick. When we’re concentrating so hard on something that our processing capacity is at its limits, the parietal cortex is not available to pay attention to new things and even dramatic changes can go unnoticed. If you’re concentrating on what the magician’s left hand is doing, you won’t notice what the right hand is doing.”
 

- The paper “Right Parietal Cortex Plays a Critical Role in Change Blindness” will be published in Cerebral Cortex and can be found online from 24th August at http://cercor.oxfordjournals.org/
 

University College London

 
Subscribe to Ophthalmology Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 



Related Ophthalmology News

Master Proteins Dictate Retinal Differentiation Timetable
Yellow plant pigments lutein and zeaxanthin reduce risk of age-related macular degeneration
Objective way to diagnose diseases of colour perception
Onchocerciasis treatment reduces prevalence and intensity by 38%
Antioxidants may slow retinal degeneration
Hormone Therapy Does Not Affect Age-Related Vision Loss
Eating Fish Protects Against Macular Degeneration
Research Highlights Risk Factors For Age-Related Vision Loss
How Thalamic Neurons Grab Your Attention
FDA approves ranibizumab for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us