XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
  Parkinson's
  Dementia
   Alzheimer's
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Alzheimer's Channel
subscribe to Alzheimer's newsletter

Latest Research : Aging : Dementia : Alzheimer's

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Increases Risk for Alzheimer
Jun 15, 2006, 17:15, Reviewed by: Dr. Ankush Vidyarthi

This work supports the theory that the majority of patients with MCI are at an intermediate stage which will end up in an acute condition. However, not all cases with mild impairment evolve to this condition.

 
Research at the University of Navarra has concluded that some patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) will develop Alzheimer in the future. The investigation of the detection of early signals of alteration was based on a multidisciplinary analysis of data from a sample of 300 individuals and undertaken at the University Hospital.

This PhD work, carried out by Lluís Samaranch, supports the theory that the majority of patients with MCI are at an intermediate stage which will end up in an acute condition. However, not all cases with mild impairment evolve to this condition.

This conclusion was arrived at after the Memory Disorder Unit at the University Hospital searched for early indicators of the ailment. Besides neuropsychological markers involved, the most significant find was the discovery of PET (Positron Emission Tomography) as a highly efficacious technique for measuring the risk of evolving MCI.

This multidisciplinary research involved neuropsychologists, nurses and engineers working together.

For more than 17 months a sample of 299 patients was studied. Of these, 103 suffered some mild cognitive impairment; 80 volunteered subjective complaints regarding memory; and 54 individuals were used as a control group, made up of volunteers from the Navarre Blood Donors’ Association.

All were tested neuropsychologically and with magnetic resonance and were subjected to various analyses and a genetic risk markers examination, amongst other procedures. Thanks to all this, the team came to the conclusion that the illness can be identified at early stages, before irreversible damage occurs, albeit with costly techniques such as the PET.

This is why the team insists on the necessity to find new, more accessible and simpler biochemical markers but with the same predictive capacity. In this manner we can undertake therapeutic intervention in the initial stages of Alzheimer – precisely when there are more possibilities of success.
 

- University of Navarra
 

www.unav.es

 
Subscribe to Alzheimer's Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 



Related Alzheimer's News

Hope remains for Alzheimer's sufferers
CATIE Study: Antipsychotics in Alzheimer's No Better Than Placebo
Mediterranean diet associated with a lower risk for Alzheimer’s disease
Omega-3 fatty acid supplements may slow cognitive decline
Microscopic brain damage detected in early Alzheimer's disease
Novel technique can identify early cellular damage in Alzheimer's disease
Cathepsin B - Part of protective mechanism against Alzheimer's
Boosting ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (Uch-L1) restores lost memory
New research points toward mechanism of age-onset toxicity of Alzheimer's protein
Structure of calbindin-D28K Protein Involved in Preventing Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s Diseases Characterised


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us