XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Nov 7th, 2006 - 22:09:39

Dental Channel
subscribe to Dental newsletter

Latest Research : Dental

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Common Antacids Could Help Keep Gingivitis at Bay
Nov 7, 2006, 22:07, Reviewed by: Dr. Shivani Arora

“The American diet and the constant drip of sugar allows little time for the natural repair of teeth. All day, it’s a cycle of acidic erosion and repair – or at least, it should be – but our constant sucking on hard candy and guzzling sodas with high fructose syrups leaves little time for repair”

 
Chemicals commonly used to treat heartburn also display fighting power against the oral bacteria linked with gum disease, according to researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center and Göteborg University in Sweden.

A study published in November’s Archives of Oral Biology explores how the active ingredients in popular antacids could help fend off gingivitis. If the work holds up in subsequent studies in people, the compounds could one day find themselves widely available in oral care products like toothpaste and mouthwashes.

“The American diet and the constant drip of sugar allows little time for the natural repair of teeth. All day, it’s a cycle of acidic erosion and repair – or at least, it should be – but our constant sucking on hard candy and guzzling sodas with high fructose syrups leaves little time for repair,” said Robert Marquis, Ph.D., of the University of Rochester Medical Center. Marquis, an internationally recognized expert on the bacteria that inhabit our mouths, is the study’s lead author.

The team studied a compound known as lansoprazole, part of a family of compounds known as benzimidazoles that already have a range of uses, primarily controlling stomach hyperacidity and killing Helicobacter pylori (the bacteria responsible for stomach ulcers). Now, the compounds are brandishing potent antimicrobial actions that interfere with the dirty work of other types of bacteria that cause plaque buildup and gingivitis.

Such bacteria make their home on unbrushed teeth, which become coated with plaque, a filmy substance that, under a microscope, appears as a teeming sea of hundreds of bacteria. Among these are gingivitis-causing bacteria that break down sugars and amino acids into toxins that are harmful to our gums.

Unchecked, an accumulation of plaque and an overgrowth of these ravenous, toxin-oozing bacteria leads to one of the body’s natural immune responses, inflammation, where bacteria-fighting cells are recruited to the gums to fight off the infection. Unfortunately, instead of just fending off the bacteria, the immune response also inflicts damage to the healthy gums. In the case of an intense infection, the battle drags out and results in more devastation to the gums, or gingivitis.

Since gingivitis can be a preamble for periodontal disease – an oral inflammation so persistent that it destroys the bone where the teeth anchor, causing them to fall out – researchers at the University of Rochester and Göteborg University in Sweden decided to focus on Fusobacterium nucleatum, an especially hardy bacterial troublemaker that plays a crucial role in setting the stage for gum disease.

When it’s not secreting irritating chemicals itself, F. nucleatum acts as a binding site for other dangerous oral bacteria that cannot directly attach to tooth surfaces on their own. These bacteria, dubbed “secondary colonizers,” rely on the help of F. nucleatum, which serves almost like an aircraft landing strip atop an aircraft carrier, allowing planes (or in this case, bacteria) to set down. With the help of F.nucleatum, these dangerous bacteria now have a place to “land” and create the damage that causes periodontal disease and tooth decay.

“It acts as a transitional organism, welcoming the bacteria which couldn’t survive there on their own, and moving the infection from above the gum line to below it,” said Marquis, professor of both Microbiology & Immunology and Oral Biology.

That’s where lansoprazole comes in. When the oral environment becomes acidic – a telltale sign of bacteria at work – lansoprazole is chemically modified to kick into action, disabling F. nucleatum and preventing it from producing toxins or serving as a landing site. Once the oral environment returns to normal, the lansoprazole simply switches off.

“Benzimidazoles aren’t just for acid-reflux anymore,” said Marquis, whose research project was supported by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. “We’ve shown their promise for preventing cavities in previous research, and now, perhaps even some protective benefits to guard against gingivitis. It’s not unthinkable that one day these compounds might be more broadly used to promote dental health in toothpastes and mouthwashes.”
 

- November’s Archives of Oral Biology
 

www.urmc.rochester.edu

 
Subscribe to Dental Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 



Related Dental News

Common Antacids Could Help Keep Gingivitis at Bay
Tetracycline plus teeth equal gray smile
Periodontal bacteria may be linked to acute coronary syndrome (ACS)
Ultrasound may help regrow teeth
Effects of stress, depression and cortisol on periodontal disease
Roasted vegetables could cause dental erosion
Periodontal therapy may help diabetic patients improve sugar control
Archaea Identified As Possible Human Pathogen
Cimetidine Inhibits Gum Disease in Rabbits
Dentistry in vogue 9,000 years ago in Balochistan


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us