XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
  CTVS
  Transplantation
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Surgery Channel
subscribe to Surgery newsletter

Latest Research : Surgery

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Perceptions of Male Culture and "Surgical Personality" Deter Women from Pursuing Surgery as Career
Apr 18, 2006, 18:53, Reviewed by: Dr. Rashmi Yadav

40 percent of women and 21.6 percent of men were deterred by their view of the "surgical personality"

 
Even though men and women are similar in factors they consider important in deciding on a career in surgery, the perception of surgery as an "old boys' club" and negative perceptions of the surgical personality may deter women from choosing the field, according to results of a small survey published in the April issue of the Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Recent analyses have suggested that more general surgeons will be needed in the future, but fewer medical students are entering surgery residencies, according to background information in the article. About half of all entering medical students are women, who have historically been less likely to choose surgery as a career.

Debra A. Gargiulo, M.D., and colleagues at the University of Vermont, Burlington surveyed 298 Vermont physicians and medical students. Of the 141 who completed the survey, there were 90 women and 60 men, including 31 attending physicians (16 general surgeons and 15 obstetrician/gynecologists), 16 residents and 94 medical students. Sixty-four percent of men and 53 percent of women indicated that were interested in a surgery career before their surgical rotation. Respondents were asked to select their top three deterrents to a surgical career. Findings included:

* 46.7 percent of female medical students vs. 20.4 percent of males perceived sex discrimination in surgery
* Among all respondents, 21.6 percent of men and 4.4 percent of women were deterred by the diminishing rewards of surgery
* 49 percent of men and 28.0 percent of women cited workload considerations
* 66.7 percent of men vs. 47.8 percent of women chose family concerns
* 83.3 percent of women and 76.5 percent of men worried about lifestyle during residency
* 40 percent of women and 21.6 percent of men were deterred by their view of the "surgical personality"
* 22.2 percent of women and 3.9 percent of men were discouraged by the perception of surgery as an "old boys' club"

The results suggest that lifestyle concerns should be addressed to attract both men and women to surgery, the authors write. "However, our results also suggest that there exists a male culture in surgery that needs to be confronted because it is a significant factor deterring women from a career in surgery Surgery remains a 'macho field'," they conclude. "Surgeons need to critically assess the nature of their interactions with students and provide an environment more conducive to women."
 

- April issue of the Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals
 

Arch Surg. 2006;141:405-408

 
Subscribe to Surgery Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 



Related Surgery News

Predicting survival in liver transplant patients
Many urinary stones can be treated without surgery
Mathematical tools for predicting facial surgery results
SALT protocol improves quality of donor lungs significantly
Costimulation blockade: Will this lead to rejection-free transplants?
Bringing space age to surgery equipment, procedures
Hepatorenal syndrome patients best benefited by a combined liver-kidney transplant
Botox Injections Help Minimize Facial Scars
Microskin relieves emotional trauma for child burn victims
'Domino' transplant program makes best use of altruistic donated kidneys


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us