XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Environmental Research Journal

Climate Channel
subscribe to Climate newsletter

World News : Climate

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Heat acclimatization cause false indications of mortality due to ozone
Oct 12, 2005, 04:47, Reviewed by: Dr.

Ozone is being wrongly blamed for many of the deaths during hot weather spells, finds a new UCL (University College London) study. UCL scientists warn that amidst all the concerns over air pollution, the more basic health message of ‘staying cool when the weather is hot' may be being forgotten.

 
A study, published online in the journal Environmental Research, modelled the daily mortality rate of people over 65 (who suffer most of the heat-related deaths) in Greater London from 1991 to 2002. The model included daily temperatures, humidity, sunshine and wind and assessed any effects of atmospheric ozone, particulates and sulphur dioxide. UCL researchers then analysed general mortality trends for days when mean air temperatures exceeded 18oC.

The team found that when temperatures topped 18oC, mortality rates in the plus-65 group rose progressively as the days grew hotter. They also found that mortality rose more with temperature rises in early summer than in late summer when people had adjusted to heat. High levels of ozone and particulates tended to be associated with sunshine, and high particulates and sulphur dioxide with low wind, both of which can increase heat stress.

The UCL study revealed that most analyses would attribute up to half of the mortality to the pollutants, unless allowance was made for adjustment to heat in late summer, and for sunshine and wind. Most conventional studies have not allowed for these effects. The authors conclude that, contrary to earlier reports, pollutants played little part in the rise in deaths associated with hot weather in the period analysed.

Professor Bill Keatinge, of the Royal Free and University College Medical School , says: “Ozone, particulates and sulphur dioxide have been fingered as the culprits when hot weather is more likely to have caused the deaths. On hot days, older people are more likely to be dying from heat stress than from air pollution. The basic message of ‘keep cool when the weather is hot' seems to be being drowned out by exaggerated concern over air pollution. Runs of hot days are particularly dangerous.

“The fact that deaths were higher in early summer rather than late summer suggests that some people were unprepared for the hot weather and may not have taken the necessary precautions to keep cool. The heat wave in France in 2003 which killed 14,000 people was an unfortunate example of what happens when people are not prepared for hot weather.

“Even Britain , which has around 800 heat-related deaths in an average summer, had more than 3,000 in the exceptionally hot summer of 2003. Global warming may well produce runs of hotter days than have ever been experienced here before, and we need to be prepared for that happening in the UK with little warning.”
 

- ‘Heat acclimatization and sunshine cause false indications of mortality due to ozone', by William Keatinge and Gavin Donaldson, is (in press) online in the journal Environmental Research (Reference: DOI 10.1016/j.envres.2005.08.012)
 

www.ucl.ac.uk

 
Subscribe to Climate Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 



Related Climate News

First Compilation of Tropical Ice Cores Shows Abrupt Global Climate Shift
East Asia may experience less drastic climate change
Global warming may affect length of Respiratory syncytial virus infection season
Heat acclimatization cause false indications of mortality due to ozone
Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund raised $2 million in online funds in hours
Atmosphere may cleanse itself better
Earth's reflectivity a great unknown in gauging climate change impacts


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us