XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
  Stem Cell Research
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Stem Cell Research Channel
subscribe to Stem Cell Research newsletter

Latest Research : Embryology : Stem Cell Research

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Spinal cord injury treatment with neural stem cells
Sep 20, 2005, 20:38, Reviewed by: Dr.

“This work is a promising first step, and supports the need to study multiple stem cell types for the possibility of treating of human neurological injury and disease”

 
Researchers at the UC Irvine Reeve-Irvine Research Center have used adult human neural stem cells to successfully regenerate damaged spinal cord tissue and improve mobility in mice.

The findings point to the promise of using this type of cells for possible therapies to help humans who have spinal cord injuries. Additionally, transplanted cells differentiated into new neurons that formed synaptic connections with mouse neurons.

When myelin is stripped away through disease or injury, sensory and motor deficiencies result and, in some cases, paralysis can occur. Previous Reeve-Irvine research has shown that transplantation of oligodendrocyte precursors derived from human embryonic stem cells restores mobility in rats.

“We were excited to find that the cells responded to the damage by making appropriate new cells that could assist in repair. This study supports the possibility that formation of new myelin and new neurons may contribute to recovery.”

Mice that received human neural stem cells nine days after spinal cord injury showed improvements in walking ability compared to mice that received either no cells or a control transplant of human fibroblast cells (which cannot differentiate into nervous system cells). Further experiments showed behavioral improvements after either moderate or more severe injuries, with the treated mice being able to step using the hind paws and coordinate stepping between paws whereas control mice were uncoordinated.

The cells survived and improved walking ability for at least four months after transplantation. Sixteen weeks after transplantation, the engrafted human cells were killed using diphtheria toxin (which is only toxic to the human cells, not the mouse). This procedure abolished the improvements in walking, suggesting that the human neural stem cells were the vital catalysts for the maintained mobility.

This study differs from previous work using human embryonic stem cells in spinal cord injury because the human neural stem cells were not coaxed into becoming specific cell types before transplantation.

“This work is a promising first step, and supports the need to study multiple stem cell types for the possibility of treating of human neurological injury and disease,” Anderson said.
 

- Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition
 

www.uci.edu.

 
Subscribe to Stem Cell Research Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 

Desiree L. Salazar and Mitra Hooshmand of UCI, Nobuko Uchida and Stan J. Tamaki of StemCells Inc., and Robert Summers and Fred H. Gage of the Salk Institute of Biological Studies participated in the study. Adult human neural stem cells were provided by StemCells Inc. in Palo Alto, Calif. The National Institutes of Health and the Christopher Reeve Foundation provided funding support.

The Reeve-Irvine Research Center was established to study how injuries and diseases traumatize the spinal cord and result in paralysis or other loss of neurologic function, with the goal of finding cures. It also facilitates the coordination and cooperation of scientists around the world seeking cures for paraplegia, quadriplegia and other diseases impacting neurological function. Named in honor of Christopher Reeve, the center is part of the UCI School of Medicine.

This Reeve-Irvine Research Center study is part of a campuswide effort at UCI to lay the groundwork for new treatments and cures through responsible exploration of stem cell research.

About the University of California, Irvine: Celebrating 40 years of innovation, the University of California, Irvine is a top-ranked university dedicated to research, scholarship and community service. Founded in 1965, UCI is among the fastest-growing University of California campuses, with more than 24,000 undergraduate and graduate students and about 1,400 faculty members. The second-largest employer in dynamic Orange County, UCI contributes an annual economic impact of $3 billion. For more UCI news, visit www.today.uci.edu.


Related Stem Cell Research News

Neural stem cells derived from human embryonic stem cells carry abnormal gene expression
Neurons grown from embryonic stem cells restore function in paralyzed rats
New stem-cell findings can help the body to cure itself
Putting avian transgenics on a par with transgenic mice
Harvard to Create Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines
Stem Cell Study for Patients with Heart Attack Damage Seeks to Regenerate Heart Muscle
Stem cells - An alternative to skin grafting?
Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP-6) factor stimulates cartilage growth from stem cells
Doctors grow organ from patients' own cells
Stem cells can repair torn tendons or ligaments


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us