XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
  Stem Cell Research
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Stem Cell Research Channel
subscribe to Stem Cell Research newsletter

Latest Research : Embryology : Stem Cell Research

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
New stem-cell findings can help the body to cure itself
Jun 16, 2006, 00:49, Reviewed by: Dr. Priya Saxena

"Understanding how cell production is regulated increases our chances of producing drugs able to stimulate the endogenous production of new cells,"

 
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have identified an important mechanism that regulates how many new cells are produced by each intestinal stem cell. The study is published in the latest issue of the prestigious scientific journal, Cell. "This might eventually help us develop new drugs for things like neurological disorders and anaemia," says Professor Jonas Frisén.

In most organs of the body, old cells are continually being replaced by new. If too many new cells are produced, however, it can lead to overgrowth and tumour formation. Too few cells, on the other hand, can result in organ degeneration. It is therefore crucial that exactly the right number of cells are produced.

As many serious disorders cause a reduction in the production of new cells, scientists are keen to develop drugs that stimulate the process, which in turn could help the body to cure itself.

It has long been known that the new cells are often formed by immature cells known as stem cells, but the mechanism regulating the number of new cells produced has remained something of a mystery. However, in a new study to be published by Cell stem-cell researcher Jonas Frisén has succeeded in showing how the body's own stem cells do just this. Working alongside an American group of researchers, Professor Frisén and his team have identified a signal transduction process that regulates the degree of stem-cell division.

"Understanding how cell production is regulated increases our chances of producing drugs able to stimulate the endogenous production of new cells," says Professor Frisén.

He hopes that the new findings can be used to develop drugs that stimulate, for example, the formation of new nerve cells to treat conditions such as stroke and Parkinson's and skin cells to facilitate the healing of wounds. Professor Frisén is best known for his research on cerebral stem cells; the present study, however, has been carried out on stem cells in the intestine, one of the organs in the body with the highest rates of cell renewal.

"We also know that blood, brain and skin stem cells express the genes that we now know to be important in the intestine," he says. "This suggests that the cell production mechanism can be the same for these stem cells too."

The next step for Professor Frisén and his group is therefore to study how blood and skin stem cells go about producing new cells.
 

- "EphB receptors coordinate migration and proliferation in the intestinal stem cell niche" by Johan Holmberg, Maria Genander, Michael M. Halford, Cecilia Annerén, Mariann Sondell, Michael J. Chumley, Robert A. Silvany, Mark Henkemeyer and Jonas Frisén Cell, June 16, 2006
 

info.ki.se/ki

 
Subscribe to Stem Cell Research Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 



Related Stem Cell Research News

Neural stem cells derived from human embryonic stem cells carry abnormal gene expression
Neurons grown from embryonic stem cells restore function in paralyzed rats
New stem-cell findings can help the body to cure itself
Putting avian transgenics on a par with transgenic mice
Harvard to Create Human Embryonic Stem Cell Lines
Stem Cell Study for Patients with Heart Attack Damage Seeks to Regenerate Heart Muscle
Stem cells - An alternative to skin grafting?
Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP-6) factor stimulates cartilage growth from stem cells
Doctors grow organ from patients' own cells
Stem cells can repair torn tendons or ligaments


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us