XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
  Parkinson's
  Dementia
   Alzheimer's
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Nov 17th, 2006 - 13:35:58

Dementia Channel
subscribe to Dementia newsletter

Latest Research : Aging : Dementia

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Occupational therapy improves quality of life for dementia patients
Nov 17, 2006, 13:34, Reviewed by: Dr. Venkat Yelamanchili

Previous research had suggested that non-pharmalogical treatment could have the same or better effects than drug treatment for people with dementia.

 
Occupational therapy can help to improve the ability of people with dementia to perform daily activities and can also reduce the pressure on their caregivers, says a BMJ study published today.

Dementia can have far reaching effects for patients and their caregivers and is a major driver of costs for both health and social care systems across the developed world. The most significant problems associated with dementia are the losses in independence, initiative and participation in social activities – factors which affect the quality of life for both patients and their caregivers and families.

Previous research had suggested that non-pharmalogical treatment could have the same or better effects than drug treatment for people with dementia.

Researchers from The Netherlands set out to measure the effect of occupational therapy on people with dementia and their main carer. A group of 135 patients with mild to moderate dementia and their caregivers were randomly split into two groups. The first group received 10 home-based sessions of occupational therapy - provided by an experienced occupational therapist - over a period of five weeks, whilst the second group received no occupational therapy. The groups were then assessed six weeks and 12 weeks after the therapy sessions.

At both six weeks and three months the patients who received occupational therapy functioned significantly better in daily life than those who did not – with 75% of those in the group showing an improvement in process skills and 82% needing less assistance in day to day tasks. Primary caregivers who received occupational therapy also felt significantly more competent than those who did not.

The authors suggest that occupational therapy is likely to be more effective than drugs or other psychosocial interventions – as the levels of improvement in their trial outstrip the effects recorded in previous trials of drugs and other interventions.

They add that they 'strongly advocate' the inclusion of occupational therapy in dementia management programmes; 'the clinical gains…obtained with occupational therapy for both patients and their caregivers underlines the importance of adequate diagnosis and pro-active management in dementia' they conclude.
 

- BMJ-British Medical Journal
 

www.bmj.com

 
Subscribe to Dementia Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 



Related Dementia News

Occupational therapy improves quality of life for dementia patients
Hope remains for Alzheimer's sufferers
Cognitive Decline is Often Undetected - Study
CATIE Study: Antipsychotics in Alzheimer's No Better Than Placebo
Mediterranean diet associated with a lower risk for Alzheimer’s disease
Omega-3 fatty acid supplements may slow cognitive decline
Microscopic brain damage detected in early Alzheimer's disease
Novel technique can identify early cellular damage in Alzheimer's disease
Cathepsin B - Part of protective mechanism against Alzheimer's
Boosting ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (Uch-L1) restores lost memory


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us