XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
  AIDS
  Influenza
  MRSA
  Tuberculosis
  Shigella
  HCV
  SARS
  Ebola
  Dengue
  Malaria
  Pertussis
  Mumps
  Prion Diseases
  Small Pox
  Anthrax
  Leishmaniasis
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

AIDS Channel
subscribe to AIDS newsletter

Latest Research : Infectious Diseases : AIDS

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Simplified treatment of HIV infection shows promise
Aug 14, 2006, 13:43, Reviewed by: Dr. Priya Saxena

"In this pilot study, the data suggest that simplified maintenance therapy with atazanavir-ritonavir alone in patients who have never experienced treatment failure may be efficacious in maintaining HIV-1 RNA suppression below 200 copies/mL for 24 weeks after discontinuing NRTIs"

 
A preliminary study indicates that using a single boosted protease inhibitor instead of the standard regimen of 3 drugs for maintenance therapy may be an effective treatment for select patients with HIV infection, according to a study in the August 16 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on HIV/AIDS.

Susan Swindells, M.B.B.S., of the University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, presented the findings of the study today at a JAMA media briefing at the International AIDS Conference in Toronto.

The long-term adverse effects, expense, and difficulty of sustained adherence to multidrug antiretroviral regimens have prompted studies of simpler therapies for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Treatment cessation, intermittent therapy, and induction-maintenance (a few months of triple therapy followed by simplified therapy) regimens have been evaluated with mostly inferior results, according to background information in the article.

Dr. Swindells and colleagues conducted a study to determine whether a simplified maintenance therapy with the antiretroviral medication "boosted" atazanavir alone after virologic suppression (cessation of detectable HIV virus replication) would not markedly increase the risk of virologic failure. Protease inhibitors, such as atazanavir, are often combined with a small dose of ritonavir to increase blood levels – a phenomenon known as "boosting." This regimen was selected because of low pill burden, once-daily dosing, safety, and unique resistance profile. The 24-week pilot study, conducted between Sept. 2004 and April 2006, included 36 HIV-infected adults with virologic suppression for 48 weeks or longer receiving their first protease inhibitor (PI)–based regimen. Participants switched PIs to atazanavir-ritonavir at entry and discontinued nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) after 6 weeks. Virologic failure was defined as two consecutive HIV-1 RNA measurements of 200 copies/mL or more. The final analysis included 34 patients.

Virologic success (absence of failure) through 24 weeks of simplified therapy occurred in 91 percent of patients (31 of 34). Three participants experienced virologic failure at 12, 14, and 20 weeks after simplification. Resistance testing at failure did not identify protease inhibitor resistance mutations. Atazanavir concentrations in the blood at failure were low or below detection in 2 of 3 participants experiencing failure, indicating these patients may not have taken the prescribed doses. There were no treatment discontinuations for adverse events after simplification and no significant changes in CD4 cell counts.

"In this pilot study, the data suggest that simplified maintenance therapy with atazanavir-ritonavir alone in patients who have never experienced treatment failure may be efficacious in maintaining HIV-1 RNA suppression below 200 copies/mL for 24 weeks after discontinuing NRTIs," the authors write. "Maintenance therapy with a single boosted PI offers a treatment strategy with potentially less complexity, pill burden, long-term complications, and cost."

The researchers add that although the findings are encouraging, caution regarding inferences is warranted due to study limitations such as the small number of participants in the study. "Larger, randomized trials comparing this approach with standard antiretroviral therapy are warranted."
 

- JAMA. 2006;296:806-814
 

pubs.ama-assn.org

 
Subscribe to AIDS Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 

This work was supported by NIH grants and a Virology Support Laboratory subcontract of the ACTG Central Group Grant. Industry support from Bristol-Myers Squibb and Abbott Laboratories was in the form of supplying study drugs and participation on the protocol team. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Related AIDS News

Keeping A3G in action represents a new way to attack HIV
Fighting HIV With HIV Virus Itself
HIV exploits competition among T-cells
Harmless GB Virus type C (GBV-C) protects against HIV infection
Study defines effective microbicide design for HIV/AIDS prevention
HIV depends on human p75, study shows
Simplified treatment of HIV infection shows promise
Clinical trial evaluates first-line approaches for treating HIV
T cells activated to fight HIV basis for dendritic cell therapeutic vaccine
B cells with special protein direct HIV to T cells


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us