XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
  Depression
  Neuropsychiatry
  Personality Disorders
  Bulimia
  Anxiety
  Substance Abuse
  Suicide
  CFS
  Psychoses
  Child Psychiatry
  Learning-Disabilities
  Psychology
  Forensic Psychiatry
  Mood Disorders
  Sleep Disorders
   Circardian Rhythm
  Peri-Natal Psychiatry
  Psychotherapy
  Anorexia Nervosa
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Sleep Disorders Channel
subscribe to Sleep Disorders newsletter

Latest Research : Psychiatry : Sleep Disorders

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Children who sleep less are three times more likely to be overweight
Mar 29, 2006, 13:15, Reviewed by: Dr. Ankush Vidyarthi

"Lack of sleep lowers the level of leptin, a hormone that stimulates metabolism and decreases hunger. In addition, short nights of sleep boost the concentration of ghrelin, a hormone that increases hunger,"

 
The less a child sleeps, the more likely he or she is to become overweight, according to researchers from Université Laval's Faculty of Medicine in an article published in the latest edition of the International Journal of Obesity. The risk of becoming overweight is 3.5 times higher in children who get less sleep than in those who sleep a lot, according to researchers Jean-Philippe Chaput, Marc Brunet, and Angelo Tremblay.

These results come from data collected among 422 grade school students aged 5 to 10. The scientists measured the weight, height, and waist size of each participant. Information on the children's lifestyle and socioeconomic status was obtained through phone interviews with their parents.

Through body mass index measurement, the researchers determined that 20% of the boys and 24% of the girls were overweight. Children who slept less than 10 hours a night were 3.5 times more at risk of being overweight than those who slept 12 or more hours. No other factor analyzed in the study--parental obesity, parents' level of education, family income, time spent in front of the TV or computer, regular physical activity--had as much of an impact on obesity than time spent sleeping.

Hormone production is currently the researchers' prime hypothesis to explain the relationship between sleep and obesity. "Lack of sleep lowers the level of leptin, a hormone that stimulates metabolism and decreases hunger. In addition, short nights of sleep boost the concentration of ghrelin, a hormone that increases hunger," explains Professor Angelo Tremblay.

The progression of obesity and the decrease in the number of hours devoted to sleep, two phenomena that have become increasingly important social issues over the last few decades, could thus be more closely related than it would appear at first glance. Between 1960 and 2000, the prevalence of obesity doubled in the population while the average night of sleep lost one to two hours. During the same period, the percentage of young adults who slept less than seven hours went from 16% to 37%.

"It's ironic that part of the solution to obesity might lie in sleep, the most sedentary of all human activities. In light of this study's results, my best prescription against obesity in children would be to encourage them to move more and to make sure they get enough sleep," concludes Tremblay.
 

- International Journal of Obesity
 

www.ulaval.ca

 
Subscribe to Sleep Disorders Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 



Related Sleep Disorders News

Risk Factors For Developing Complications From Sleep Apnea Surgery
Studying sleep deprivation's effect on decisions
New sleep gene discovery wakes up scientists
Diphenhydramine Does Not Improve Infant Sleep
People sleep even less than they think
Computer models may reveal what makes human body clock tick
New fruit fly protein JET illuminates circadian response to light
CBT More Effective Than Zopiclone in Insomnia
Severe hot flashes associated with chronic insomnia
Acting out vivid dreams may forewarn of more serious illness


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us