XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
  Anti-Inflammatory
   Rofecoxib
  Antivirals
  Antihypertensives
  Anticholesterol
  Anti-Clotting Drugs
  Anti Cancer Drugs
  Hypnotics
  PPI
  Antibiotics
  Analgesics
  Surfactants
  Fatty Acids
  Adrenergics
  Metals
  Varenicline
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38
Research Article

Anti-Inflammatory Channel
subscribe to Anti-Inflammatory newsletter

Latest Research : Pharmacology : Anti-Inflammatory

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Ibuprofen - worsening cognitive function
Jul 22, 2006, 05:22, Reviewed by: Dr. Sanjukta Acharya

"But to our surprise, we found that the injured rats given ibuprofen were far worse compared to the injured rats that had no treatment at all," says lead author Douglas H. Smith, MD, Director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair. "Although most untreated injured animals could find the platform, they were much slower to learn its location than non-injured animals. In contrast, almost none of the treated, injured animals could find the platform at all."

 
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine found that chronic ibuprofen therapy given after brain injury worsens cognitive abilities. These findings in a preliminary, animal-model study have important implications for traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients who are often prescribed such nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) as ibuprofen for chronic pain. The findings appear online this month in Experimental Neurology.

Because several studies in animals and humans have shown that long-term use of ibuprofen for inflammation improves outcome for Alzheimer's patients by reducing symptoms and delaying the onset of dementia, the researchers investigated whether ibuprofen improved long-term cognitive outcome in brain-injured animals.

Over four months, rats received ibuprofen in their food proportional to doses given to humans. In the two groups of injured rats (one fed ibuprofen and the other not), there was a significant overall deficit in the animals' ability to find an underwater platform in a Morris water maze, a common test used to assess cognitive ability in animals.

"But to our surprise, we found that the injured rats given ibuprofen were far worse compared to the injured rats that had no treatment at all," says lead author Douglas H. Smith, MD, Director of the Center for Brain Injury and Repair. "Although most untreated injured animals could find the platform, they were much slower to learn its location than non-injured animals. In contrast, almost none of the treated, injured animals could find the platform at all."

However, there were no outward signs of difference in the extent of atrophy in the hippocampus or cortex of treated versus non-treated injured rats. Although ibuprofen treatment did reduce chronic inflammatory changes in the brains of injured animals, that did not seem to have an influence over the extent of damage to the brain regions associated with learning and memory.

This initial study demonstrates that the effects of long-term treatment with NSAIDS like ibuprofen after a head injury are poorly understood. "We have to remember these are animal studies, and what we can take home is that we need further examination of potential negative effects in patients," says Smith. "I hope these findings inspire studies in patients to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and potential long-term problems with cognition of chronic ibuprofen use in TBI patients."

In Alzheimer's patients, chronic ibuprofen appears to be beneficial by delaying onset and severity of symptoms. Similarly, chronic ibuprofen therapy in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease reduces plaque build-up in the brain and improves function. However, finding that this same approach to treatment worsens the outcome in an animal model of TBI may have important implications for TBI patients who are often prescribed NSAIDS for chronic pain. With few alternative over-the-counter pain medicines available to these patients, further investigation is essential, says Smith.

 

- University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
 

 
Subscribe to Anti-Inflammatory Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 

Study co-authors are Kevin D. Browne, Akira Iwata, and M.E. Putt, all from Penn. The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.

PENN Medicine is a $2.9 billion enterprise dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and high-quality patient care. PENN Medicine consists of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System.

Penn's School of Medicine is ranked #2 in the nation for receipt of NIH research funds; and ranked #3 in the nation in U.S. News & World Report's most recent ranking of top research-oriented medical schools. Supporting 1,400 fulltime faculty and 700 students, the School of Medicine is recognized worldwide for its superior education and training of the next generation of physician-scientists and leaders of academic medicine.

The University of Pennsylvania Health System includes three hospitals, all of which have received numerous national patient-care honors (Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania; Pennsylvania Hospital, the nation's first hospital; and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center); a faculty practice plan; a primary-care provider network; two multispecialty satellite facilities; and home care and hospice.



Related Anti-Inflammatory News

Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors: The latest anti-inflammatory
Ibuprofen - worsening cognitive function
COX 2 inhibitors associated with increased risk of vascular events
Therapeutic prospects beyond COX -2 inhibitors
Ceramide Kinase (CERK) may be a target for new anti-inflammatory drugs
No evidence for greater stomach protection by Cox-2 Inhibitors
European Medicines Agency update on non-selective NSAIDs
NSAIDS and Cox 2 inhibitors increase risk of MI - Study
Eszopiclone Cost Effective in Long-Term Treatment of Insomnia
FDA asks Pfizer to withdraw Bextra and add boxed warning to Celebrex


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us