XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
  Anti-Inflammatory
   Rofecoxib
  Antivirals
  Antihypertensives
  Anticholesterol
  Anti-Clotting Drugs
  Anti Cancer Drugs
  Hypnotics
  PPI
  Antibiotics
  Analgesics
  Surfactants
  Fatty Acids
  Adrenergics
  Metals
  Varenicline
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Nov 17th, 2006 - 22:35:04

Anti-Inflammatory Channel
subscribe to Anti-Inflammatory newsletter

Latest Research : Pharmacology : Anti-Inflammatory

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Celecoxib Reduces Proliferation of Cancer Cells by also Targeting Cyclin D1
Mar 19, 2005, 10:19, Reviewed by: Dr.

“These studies suggest that celecoxib exerts a second mode of action independent of its known anti-inflammatory mechanism that imposes further restrictions on the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. The results provide potentially important insights into our understanding of the overall anti-tumor activity of selective COX-2 inhibitors.”

 
Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor with promising anti-cancer properties, has now been found to attack prostate cancer cells in a second way that differs from Vioxx (rofecoxib), another anti-inflammatory drug that also inhibits COX-2.

In studies published in the March 1 issue of the journal Clinical Cancer Research, scientists at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University revealed that celecoxib, marketed under the name Celebrex, not only targets COX-2, but also reduces levels of a key protein, cyclin D1, that’s critical for cell replication.

“It is well established that COX-2 is a significant and rational target for anti-cancer therapy,” said Andrew Dannenberg, M.D., director of cancer prevention at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University and senior author of the paper.

“These studies suggest that celecoxib exerts a second mode of action independent of its known anti-inflammatory mechanism that imposes further restrictions on the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. The results provide potentially important insights into our understanding of the overall anti-tumor activity of selective COX-2 inhibitors.”

Dannenberg and a team of investigators discovered this new mechanism by applying celecoxib to prostate cancer cells that failed to express COX-2. Here, the scientists observed that the celecoxib-treated cancer cells did not replicate as rapidly as untreated cells. After further analysis, they found the drug worked by suppressing amounts of cyclin D1, a protein that’s essential if cells are to grow, divide and spread.

The scientists also attempted to replicate the experiment with Vioxx substituting for celecoxib. In this case, the prostate cancer cells continued to flourish.

“These results support the notion of a unique action by celecoxib that is independent of COX-2, and that’s different from Vioxx,” said Dannenberg.

“These beneficial effects were observed at concentrations of celecoxib that occur in humans,” added Dannenberg. “This increases the likelihood that our findings are clinically relevant.”

Dannenberg and his colleagues then demonstrated that celecoxib worked in animals that served as hosts for human prostate tumors. In this animal model, celecoxib not only was shown to reduce proliferation of cancer cells, but also reduced the growth of blood vessels at the tumor sites. As a result, tumor mass and blood vessel density in the treated animals was about half that observed in the untreated animals.
 

- March 1 issue of the journal Clinical Cancer Research
 

AACR

 
Subscribe to Anti-Inflammatory Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 

Contributing to the studies, along with Dannenberg, were Kotha Subbaramaiah, Baoheng Du and Mindy Chang from Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, N.Y.; Manish Patel, Carlos Cardon-Cardo, and Howard Thaler, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, N.Y.; and Peiying Yang and Robert Newman, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. This research was supported by funding from the National Cancer Institute.

Founded in 1907, the American Association for Cancer Research is a professional society of more than 24,000 laboratory, translational, and clinical scientists engaged in all areas of cancer research in the United States and in more than 60 other countries. AACR's mission is to accelerate the prevention and cure of cancer through research, education, communication, and advocacy. Its principal activities include the publication of five major peer-reviewed scientific journals: Cancer Research; Clinical Cancer Research; Molecular Cancer Therapeutics; Molecular Cancer Research; and Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. AACR's Annual Meeting attracts more than 15,000 participants who share new and significant discoveries in the cancer field. Specialty meetings, held throughout the year, focus on the latest developments in all areas of cancer research.


Related Anti-Inflammatory News

Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors: The latest anti-inflammatory
Ibuprofen - worsening cognitive function
COX 2 inhibitors associated with increased risk of vascular events
Therapeutic prospects beyond COX -2 inhibitors
Ceramide Kinase (CERK) may be a target for new anti-inflammatory drugs
No evidence for greater stomach protection by Cox-2 Inhibitors
European Medicines Agency update on non-selective NSAIDs
NSAIDS and Cox 2 inhibitors increase risk of MI - Study
Eszopiclone Cost Effective in Long-Term Treatment of Insomnia
FDA asks Pfizer to withdraw Bextra and add boxed warning to Celebrex


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us