XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
  Drug Delivery
  Nanotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Biotechnology Channel
subscribe to Biotechnology newsletter

Latest Research : Biotechnology

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Artificial intelligence to help intensive care doctors
Sep 4, 2005, 09:27, Reviewed by: Dr.

"This system is not intended to replace the work that doctors do in intensive care units. However it will provide them with invaluable assistance by evaluating the complex interactions of different drugs which are needed to treat patients and protect them against the danger of septic shock."

 
A team of systems engineers from the University of Sheffield is developing an intelligent computer system which imitates a doctor's brain to make treatment decisions for intensive care patients. The system will take some of the workload from emergency medical teams by monitoring patients' vital signs and then evaluating and administering the right amounts of different drugs needed - a job usually carried out by specialist medical doctors.

The team, led by Professor Mahdi Mahfouf in the University of Sheffield's Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, is pioneering the intelligent decision-support system which, in effect, duplicates the decision making processes of specialist medical doctors in Intensive Care Units (ITU).

The system models all the possible interactions between different drugs and patients' bodies, and then makes intelligent decisions about the best way to treat patients during heart bypass operations, and post-operatively in the ITU. This unique system can decide on the types and quantities of drugs to give to patients in a matter of seconds. This will help doctors provide effective treatment for patients, whilst allowing them to concentrate on as many other important tasks as possible.

Professor Mahdi Mahfouf of the University of Sheffield explains that it is the system's ability to learn, adapt, and make informed decisions which is unique: "This new system not only monitors and treats critical patients, but it can also learn from the experiences of medical staff, who can override the machine at any time. If overridden, the system assimilates the doctor's input and uses the new information to make decisions about similar cases in the future.

"This system is not intended to replace the work that doctors do in intensive care units. However it will provide them with invaluable assistance by evaluating the complex interactions of different drugs which are needed to treat patients and protect them against the danger of septic shock."
 

- Professor Mahdi Mahfouf in the University of Sheffield's Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering
 

University of Sheffield

 
Subscribe to Biotechnology Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 

The research is being carried out by Professor Mahfouf in partnership with Dr Jonathan Ross from the Academic Unit of Anaesthesia at the University of Sheffield, and Dr Gary Mills from the Sheffield Royal Hallamshire Hospital.

The research is being funded via two grants from the EPSRC totalling £400,000.


Related Biotechnology News

Gold Nanoparticle Molecular Ruler to Measure Smallest of Life’s Phenomena
Tiny inhaled particles take easy route from nose to brain
DNA Amplification and Detection Made Simple
Solitons Could Power Artificial Muscles
Nanoparticles could deliver multi-drug therapy to tumors
Nanotechnology can identify disease at early cellular level
Light-sensitive particles change chemistry at the flick of a switch
DNA Fragments for Making Tomatoes Taste Better Identified
'Custom' nanoparticles could improve cancer diagnosis and treatment
Human albumin from tobacco plants


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us