XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
  Drug Delivery
  Nanotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Biotechnology Channel
subscribe to Biotechnology newsletter

Latest Research : Biotechnology

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
DNA Fragments for Making Tomatoes Taste Better Identified
Mar 27, 2006, 04:19, Reviewed by: Dr. Priya Saxena

The scientists used molecular biological methods to identify parts of the tomato genomes responsible for biochemical changes.

 
Tomatoes are a major nutrient for humans. In 2004, 120,000 tonnes of tomatoes were harvested worldwide - and every year this number increases. Numerous medical studies have shown the health value of tomatoes. Lycopen, the pigment that makes tomatoes red, can for example prevent heart disease. Tomatoes furthermore contain a lot of vitamins C and E, indispensable for human nourishment. But after centuries of cultivation for shape, colour, and other useful qualities, our cultured tomatoes today are of small genetic diversity, in comparison with wild types. This has affected the taste and health value of the fruits.

To cultivate tomato strains with particular characteristics, researchers have to increase the genetic diversity of cultured tomatoes. This can be done either by cross-breeding them with wild tomatoes, or changing their genetic make-up technologically. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology in Golm, and their Israeli colleagues at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, chose the second option. They investigated strains of tomatoes created from the crossing of cultured and wild types. Their goal was to identify the biochemical composition of fruits and determine which factors control their development. The German-Israeli research team used a method of analysis developed at the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology. The technique - a combination of mass spectrometry and gas chromatography - analyzes the composition of biological samples. It can be used to quickly and simultaneously look into a fruit’s amino acids, organic acids, sugar and vitamins.

Dr. Alisdair Fernie, head of the Institute’s "Central Metabolism" research group, discovered that there were 880 variations in the content composition of descendants produced by crossing cultured tomatoes and wild tomatoes. "On one hand, we measured higher amounts of essential amino acids and vitamins, on the other hand the fruits showed an altered combination of various sugars and organic acids," Fernie says. These contents have a great influence on the taste of tomatoes.

A) tomato plants and B) tomato fruits of the Solarum Lycopersicum complex, which are easily cross-bred with each other. Various wild tomatoes - (I) S. chmielewskii, (II) S. habrochaites, (IV) S. pimpinellifolium, (V) S. neorickii, (VI) S. pennellii - are all excellent for hybridisation with the cultured tomato (III) S. lycoperisicum. Image Courtesy: Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology

The scientists used molecular biological methods to identify parts of the tomato genomes responsible for biochemical changes. The researchers’ findings could make it possible in the future to cross-breed wild tomatoes with cultured tomatoes in a targeted way to make them more nutritious.
 

- Nicolas Schauer, Yaniv Semel, Ute Roessner, Amit Gur, Ilse Balso, Fernando Carrari, Tzili Pleban, Alicia Perez-Melis, Claudia Bruedigam, Joachim Kopka, Lothar Willmitzer, Dani Zamir & Alisdair Fernie Comprehensive metabolic profiling and phenotyping of interspecific introgression lines for tomato improvement Nature biotechnology, March 12, 2006
 

www.mpg.de

 
Subscribe to Biotechnology Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 

This research was supported by the Max Planck Society under the Agreement on German-Israeli Project Cooperation (DIP).

Related Biotechnology News

Gold Nanoparticle Molecular Ruler to Measure Smallest of Life’s Phenomena
Tiny inhaled particles take easy route from nose to brain
DNA Amplification and Detection Made Simple
Solitons Could Power Artificial Muscles
Nanoparticles could deliver multi-drug therapy to tumors
Nanotechnology can identify disease at early cellular level
Light-sensitive particles change chemistry at the flick of a switch
DNA Fragments for Making Tomatoes Taste Better Identified
'Custom' nanoparticles could improve cancer diagnosis and treatment
Human albumin from tobacco plants


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us