XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
  Depression
  Neuropsychiatry
  Personality Disorders
  Bulimia
  Anxiety
  Substance Abuse
  Suicide
  CFS
  Psychoses
  Child Psychiatry
  Learning-Disabilities
  Psychology
  Forensic Psychiatry
  Mood Disorders
  Sleep Disorders
  Peri-Natal Psychiatry
  Psychotherapy
  Anorexia Nervosa
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Bulimia Channel
subscribe to Bulimia newsletter

Latest Research : Psychiatry : Bulimia

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Eating and Body Weight Regulated by Specific Neurons
Sep 14, 2005, 03:19, Reviewed by: Dr.

“Previous studies showed that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, is responsible for the regulation of eating. But until now, no experimental evidence was available to prove that AgRP neurons are critical for acute regulation of eating.”

 
Researchers at Yale School of Medicine provide direct evidence that two parts of a neuronal system, one that promotes eating and another that suppresses eating, are critical for the acute regulation of eating and body weight, according to a study published online in the September 11 issue of Nature Neuroscience.

The paper makes it clear that the agouti-related peptide-expressing (AgRP) neurons are mandatory for eating. “Previous studies showed that the brain, particularly the hypothalamus, is responsible for the regulation of eating,” said co-senior author Tamas Horvath, chair and associate professor in the Section of Comparative Medicine, and associate professor in neurobiology and the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences. “But until now, no experimental evidence was available to prove that AgRP neurons are critical for acute regulation of eating.”

Horvath’s collaborator Jens Bruening of the University of Cologne in Germany introduced the avian diphtheria toxin receptor into neurons in the feeding support system of transgenic mice. When the animals were adults, two injections of toxin caused the specific cell population to die within 48 hours, impairing the mouse’s ability to eat and resulting in acute anorexia. These mice also showed marked reduction in blood glucose, plasma insulin and Leptin concentrations.

“Our results confirm the hypothesis that these two systems are critical for eating and the cessation of eating,” said Horvath. “Previous transgenic approaches failed to provide this proof because of compensatory mechanisms that could operate during development. None of those actually knocked out neuronal function. In this case, however, neurons are gone and there is no time to replace their function.”

In explaining the significance of the finding, Horvath said, “It is important to ensure that the multibillion dollar academic and pharmaceutical approach against metabolic disorders is leaning in the right direction. The approach in general could also eventually lead to specific destruction of cells in other kinds of diseases.”
 

- Nature Neuroscience, Published online September 11, in print: October 2005 Vol. 8 No. 10
 

www.yale.edu

 
Subscribe to Bulimia Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 

Other authors on the study included Eva Gropp, Marya Shanabrough, Erzsebet Borak, Allison W. Xu, Ruth Janoschek, Thorsten Buch, Leona Plum, Nina Balthasar, Brigitte Hampel, Ari Waisman, Gregory S. Barsh, and co-senior author Jens Bruning.

Related Bulimia News

Investigating the psychology of food consumption
Eating and Body Weight Regulated by Specific Neurons
Childhood sexual abuse linked to eating disorders during pregnancy
Overactive dopamine receptors may help explain eating disorder's symptoms
Computerised CBT Treatment for Eating Disorder Patients to be Offered Online
Rates of bulimia nervosa increased threefold
Eating too much in childhood predicts development of bulimia nervosa in adulthood


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us