XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
  Depression
  Neuropsychiatry
  Personality Disorders
  Bulimia
  Anxiety
  Substance Abuse
  Suicide
  CFS
  Psychoses
  Child Psychiatry
  Learning-Disabilities
  Psychology
  Forensic Psychiatry
  Mood Disorders
  Sleep Disorders
  Peri-Natal Psychiatry
  Psychotherapy
   Hypnotherapy
  Anorexia Nervosa
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38
Research Article

Psychotherapy Channel
subscribe to Psychotherapy newsletter

Latest Research : Psychiatry : Psychotherapy

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Cognitive Behavioural-Therapy more effective than brief dynamic therapy for avoidant personality disorder
Jul 10, 2006, 18:22, Reviewed by: Dr. Venkat Yelamanchili

Given the high prevalence of avoidant personality disorder in the community, the persistence of the disorder, and the high level of functional impairment associated with it, the effectiveness of CBT in treating this condition provides an important step forward for community mental healthcare.

 
A new study from Holland has found that cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) was more effective than brief dynamic therapy, or being on the waiting list, for people with avoidant personality disorder. Brief dynamic therapy was no better than the waiting list control condition.

Until now there have been few controlled trials examining the effectiveness of individual psychotherapy in personality disorders, especially in patients with what are called ‘Cluster C’ disorders.

These include dependent, obsessive compulsive and avoidant personality disorders. Of all the personality disorders, the avoidant type has been found to be the most persistent, even tending to worsen over time.

Published in the July issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry, the study compared the effectiveness of the two therapies as outpatient treatment for people with avoidant personality disorder with a waiting list control group.

62 patients aged between 24 and 61 who met the criteria for avoidant personality disorder were randomly assigned to 20 weekly sessions of either brief dynamic therapy or CBT over a 6-month period, or they were assigned to the waiting list control group.

After the waiting period, patients in the control group were randomly assigned to one of the two therapies. All groups were followed up at 6 months, and self-reports were completed by patients before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 6 months after the treatment was completed.

It was found that patients receiving CBT showed significantly more improvements on a number of measures, in comparison with those who had brief dynamic therapy or were in the waiting list control group. These results were maintained at follow-up.

The authors of the study comment that it is unclear whether prolonged treatment would have resulted in superior results. Although there have been studies on behavioural treatments for avoidant personality disorders, none have looked at cognitive therapy. Whether cognitive therapy enhances the effects of behavioural therapy deserves further study.

It should be noted that the therapists in this study were experts in their fields, and were selected and trained for this project. It is unknown whether the same results would apply to untrained therapists working in other kinds of community setting.

Given the high prevalence of avoidant personality disorder in the community, the persistence of the disorder, and the high level of functional impairment associated with it, the effectiveness of CBT in treating this condition provides an important step forward for community mental healthcare.
 

- Royal College of Psychiatrists
 

www.rcpsych.ac.uk

 
Subscribe to Psychotherapy Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 



Related Psychotherapy News

Schema Therapy fosters full recovery in borderline personality disorder
The Mental Health Foundation to give free online access to CCBT
Cognitive Behavioural-Therapy more effective than brief dynamic therapy for avoidant personality disorder
Hypnotherapy improves quality of life for people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Anonymity of Internet aids online counselling
Hypnotherapy could help ease gastric acid reflux
Hypnotherapy helps relieve chest pain


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us