XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
  Breast
  Skin
  Blood
  Prostate
  Liver
  Colon
  Thyroid
  Endometrial
  Brain
  Therapy
  Risk Factors
  Esophageal
  Bladder
  Lung
   Small Cell Carcinoma
  Rectal Cancer
  Pancreatic Cancer
  Bone Cancer
  Cervical Cancer
  Testicular Cancer
  Gastric Cancer
  Ovarian Cancer
  Nerve Tissue
  Renal Cell Carcinoma
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Lung Channel
subscribe to Lung newsletter

Latest Research : Cancer : Lung

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Women with Lung Cancer Live Longer than Men
Nov 4, 2005, 22:01, Reviewed by: Dr.

"Yet, new data suggest that even in untreated patients, women with lung cancer still live longer than men, despite the presence of other medical conditions or gender differences in life expectancy. This suggests that the progression of lung cancer has a biological basis, with the disease being more aggressive in men than women."

 
Women with lung cancer are living longer than men, even when the disease is untreated. A new study presented at CHEST 2005, the 71st annual international scientific assembly of the of Chest Physicians (ACCP), found that in patients receiving treatment for lung cancer, women had significantly better survival rates than men. However, in untreated patients, women also had a 21 percent decreased risk of death as compared with men, leading researchers to believe lung cancer in women has a different biologic behavior and natural history than in men.

"In patients with lung cancer receiving treatment, women have shown a better response to therapy, resulting in better survival rates," said Juan Wisnivesky, MD, MPH, FCCP, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY. "Yet, new data suggest that even in untreated patients, women with lung cancer still live longer than men, despite the presence of other medical conditions or gender differences in life expectancy. This suggests that the progression of lung cancer has a biological basis, with the disease being more aggressive in men than women."

Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine reviewed 18,967 cases of stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer diagnosed between 1991 and 1999 from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare records. Patients were grouped into three categories according to treatment received: surgery, radiation or chemotherapy, and untreated cases. After adjusting for comorbidities and general life expectancy, researchers found that women in the three groups had significantly better cancer specific, overall, and relative survival than men. In treated patients, lung cancer specific 5-year survival for women was 54 percent compared with 40 percent for men and women had a 30 percent decreased risk of death compared with men. Among untreated patients, women had a 21 percent decreased risk of lung cancer deaths after adjusting for differences in age, race, socioeconomic status, access to care, and cancer histology. Researchers also found that women lived longer than men after controlling for age, race, disease stage at diagnosis, histology, median income, geographic area, access to care, and type of treatment.

"It is clear that gender plays a role in the survival rate of men and women," said W. Michael Alberts, MD, FCCP, President of the of Chest Physicians. "Physicians caring for patients with lung cancer should consider the inherent progression of lung cancer among men and women when deciding on a patient's course of treatment."
 

- The study was presented at CHEST 2005, the 71st annual international scientific assembly of the of Chest Physicians (ACCP)
 

www.chestnet.org

 
Subscribe to Lung Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 

CHEST 2005 is the 71st annual international scientific assembly of the of Chest Physicians, held October 29 through November 3 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ACCP represents 16,500 members who provide clinical respiratory, critical care, sleep, and cardiothoracic patient care in the United States and throughout the world. The ACCP's mission is to promote the prevention and treatment of diseases of the chest through leadership, education, research, and communication. For more information about the ACCP, please visit the ACCP Web site at http://www.chestnet.org .

of Chest Physicians

CONTACT: Jennifer Stawarz of American College of Chest Physicians,+1-847-498-8306, , or, Danette Berry of SpectrumScience Communications, +1-202-955-6222,


Related Lung News

Gene Expression Profiling Not Quite Perfected in Predicting Lung Cancer Prognosis
I-ELCAP study: Lung cancer can be detected early with annual low-dose CT screening
Key to lung cancer chemotherapy resistance revealed
3D-CRT brings hope for inoperable lung cancers
Sunitinib Malate shows promise against advanced form of lung cancer
Tarceva-Celebrex Combination therapy shows promising results in advanced lung cancer
Lung cancer susceptibility runs in families - Study
Do Variants in the GST Detoxification Genes Affect the Risk of Lung Cancer?
Tumor diameter - an important prognostic indicator for curability
Palliative radiation can cure some NSCLC


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us