XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
  Breast
  Skin
  Blood
  Prostate
  Liver
  Colon
  Thyroid
  Endometrial
  Brain
  Therapy
  Risk Factors
  Esophageal
  Bladder
  Lung
  Rectal Cancer
  Pancreatic Cancer
  Bone Cancer
  Cervical Cancer
  Testicular Cancer
  Gastric Cancer
  Ovarian Cancer
  Nerve Tissue
  Renal Cell Carcinoma
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Prostate Channel
subscribe to Prostate newsletter

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
PSA remains the best indicator of cancer recurrence after surgery
Sep 13, 2005, 04:32, Reviewed by: Dr.

"From our study and others, it is clear that a single PSA value is an extremely useful measure of a patient's risk of progression after surgery,"

 
Despite recent claims by some urologists that measuring the blood protein prostate-specific antigen (PSA) may not be effective in predicting risk of prostate cancer, a Johns Hopkins study of more than 2,000 men confirms that PSA remains the best measure of the likelihood of cancer recurrence after surgery.

Results of the study, published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology, demonstrated that men with high PSA levels prior to prostate removal surgery were significantly more likely to have advanced clinical stages of cancer, evidence of higher grade cancers in surgically removed tissue, and spread of cancer cells beyond the prostate. In addition, increasing PSA was significantly associated with increased risk of cancer recurrence after surgery, even in men with lower PSA levels prior to surgery.

The study was led by Stephen J. Freedland, M.D., clinical instructor of urology, and Alan W. Partin, M.D., Ph.D., professor and chair of urology at Johns Hopkins' Brady Urological Institute.

"In our study, PSA levels measured before prostate removal surgery were significantly associated with the risk of recurrent cancer after surgery," Freedland says. "These data support the notion that PSA remains the best available prostate cancer tumor marker. It certainly suggests that the PSA era is alive and well."

PSA is a protein produced by cells of the prostate gland. Prostate cancer can increase PSA, so the higher the PSA level, the greater the likelihood that a patient has prostate cancer. Also, higher PSA values generally reflect larger, more aggressive cancers. Freedland acknowledges that because PSA provides physicians with a measure of a patient's prostate health at a single point in time, it's "far from perfect." However, he says, "it's better than anything else we have."

"As a screening tool, PSA has done what we wanted it to do," Freedland says. "It detects advanced disease early and reduces the likelihood of metastatic disease."

For the study, Freedland and colleagues reviewed patient records for 2,312 men who had prostate removal surgery at Johns Hopkins between 1992 and 2004. All operations were performed by Patrick C. Walsh, M.D., professor and former chair of urology. The research team compared the association between preoperative PSA and the risk of cancer recurrence after surgery.

During an average follow-up of five years, 211 men (10 percent) had signs of recurrent cancer. Higher PSA levels prior to surgery were significantly associated with increased risk of cancer after surgery. Compared to men with PSA levels less than 10 nanograms per milliliter, men with PSA values between 10 and 19.9 nanograms per milliliter were more than three times more likely to develop cancer after surgery. Men with PSA levels of 20 nanograms per milliliter or greater were more than five times more likely to develop cancer after surgery than those with low PSA levels.

Even in men with PSA values of less than 10 nanograms per milliliter, increasing PSA was significantly associated with increased risk of cancer after surgery. For each two-point increase in PSA, the risk of cancer after surgery approximately doubled.

"From our study and others, it is clear that a single PSA value is an extremely useful measure of a patient's risk of progression after surgery," Freedland says. "However, looking at how quickly the PSA increases over time is likely to be even more informative than a single value.
 

- October issue of The Journal of Urology
 

www.hopkinsmedicine.org

 
Subscribe to Prostate Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 

The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense and the American Foundation for Urological Disease/American Urological Association.

Coauthors were Leslie A. Mangold and Walsh.


Related Prostate News

Gene therapy study takes aim at prostate cancer
Pain associated with prostatic biopsy is related to the site biopsied
Admixture mapping reveals locus for prostate cancer risk
Diet modification and stress reduction may attenuate progression of prostate cancer
Prostatic Irradiation Doesn’t Lead To Any Appreciable Increase in Rectal Cancer Risk
Pomegranate Juice Slows PSA Acceleration Rate
Pomegranate juice could kill cancer cells
Early estrogen exposure leads to later prostate cancer risk
JHDM2A enzyme induced H3K9 demethylation offers new look at male hormone regulation
What is the appropriate age to stop prostate cancer screening?


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us