XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
  Breast
  Skin
  Blood
  Prostate
  Liver
  Colon
  Thyroid
  Endometrial
  Brain
  Therapy
  Risk Factors
  Esophageal
  Bladder
  Lung
  Rectal Cancer
  Pancreatic Cancer
  Bone Cancer
  Cervical Cancer
  Testicular Cancer
  Gastric Cancer
  Ovarian Cancer
  Nerve Tissue
  Renal Cell Carcinoma
 Psychiatry
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Prostate Channel
subscribe to Prostate newsletter

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
EphB2 mutation linked with prostate cancer risk in african-americans
Sep 21, 2005, 19:10, Reviewed by: Dr.

“This is the first gene mutation to be associated with familial prostate cancer in African-American men”

 
Researchers have identified a gene mutation that may increase the risk of prostate cancer up to three times in African-American men with a family history of the disease.

The study, by scientists at 13 research centers, found that mutations in a gene known as EphB2 occurred in 15 percent of African-American men with a strong family history of prostate cancer. The mutation was found in only 5 percent of African-American men with no family or personal history of the disease and in less than 2 percent of European-American men with no history of the disease.

Prostate cancer rates are extremely high in African-American men. Until now, no gene mutations have been identified that contribute to hereditary prostate cancer and prostate-cancer susceptibility specifically in African-American men.

“Next, we must learn more about how this mutation contributes to cancer, and we must screen for the mutation in a much larger group of African-American men with prostate cancer to verify its association with the disease.”

Then, says Kittles, a specialist in prostate-cancer genetics in African Americans, “perhaps we can begin using this mutation to help estimate prostate-cancer risk in African-American men.”

The findings are the first to come out of the African-American Hereditary Prostate Cancer (AAHPC) study network, a group of 112 African-American families nationally who have volunteered to help in research to identify genetic risk factors for prostate cancer. Families in the network have had four or more cases of prostate cancer in the family.

“This as an exciting extension to our original findings implicating EphB2 as a prostate-cancer tumor-suppressor gene,” says principal investigator John D. Carpten, of the Translational Genomics Research Institute.

“These data now suggest that mutations in this gene might predispose African-American men to prostate cancer in a significant way.”

Other evidence suggesting that EphB2 could be a prostate-cancer susceptibility gene include its location on chromosome 1. After sequencing the gene from each volunteer, the investigators found that 11 of the 72 men (15.3 percent) had a mutation designated K1019X. The same mutation was found in only 5.2 percent in a control group of 329 healthy African-American men and in only 1.7 percent of 231 European-American control samples.

The findings indicate that the K1019X mutation is found mainly in African-American men, that it is particularly prevalent in African-American men with a family history of prostate cancer, and that it increases the risk of prostate cancer in these men almost three-fold.

“Given its high frequency in hereditary cases, we believe that this mutation is probably associated with hereditary prostate cancer in African-American men,” Kittles says.
 

- The findings are published online in the Sept. 9, 2005, issue of the Journal of Medical Genetics.
 

www.osu.edu

 
Subscribe to Prostate Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 

Funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities, the National Cancer Institute, the Department of Defense, the U.S. Public Health Service and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania supported this research.

The other centers participating in the study were the Fox Chase Cancer Center; Translational Genomics Research Institute; the National Genome Center at Howard University; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; University of California Davis Cancer Center; Midtown Urology Surgical Center, Atlanta, Georgia; Columbia University Medical Center; the University of Illinois at Chicago; Medical College of Georgia School of Nursing; National Human Genome Research Institute; the NIH Center for Inherited Disease Research; and the Karmanos Cancer Institute.


Related Prostate News

Gene therapy study takes aim at prostate cancer
Pain associated with prostatic biopsy is related to the site biopsied
Admixture mapping reveals locus for prostate cancer risk
Diet modification and stress reduction may attenuate progression of prostate cancer
Prostatic Irradiation Doesn’t Lead To Any Appreciable Increase in Rectal Cancer Risk
Pomegranate Juice Slows PSA Acceleration Rate
Pomegranate juice could kill cancer cells
Early estrogen exposure leads to later prostate cancer risk
JHDM2A enzyme induced H3K9 demethylation offers new look at male hormone regulation
What is the appropriate age to stop prostate cancer screening?


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us