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Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Journal: Biological Psychiatry

Bipolar Disorder Channel
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Latest Research : Psychiatry : Psychoses : Bipolar Disorder

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Brain Changes Indicating Bipolar Disorder Are Not Prominent Until Adulthood
Jan 31, 2006, 19:16, Reviewed by: Dr. Ankush Vidyarthi

"Research to understand bipolar disorder in youths is especially important because of their high risk for suicide."

 
Changes in the brain that are important indicators of bipolar disorder are not prominent until young adulthood and are reduced in persons taking mood-stabilizing medications, Yale School of Medicine researchers report this month in Biological Psychiatry.

The researchers used magnetic resonance imaging to measure a part of the brain that regulates emotions, the ventral prefrontal cortex, that lies above the eyes. The changes in persons with bipolar disorder were not prominent until young adulthood, suggesting that the illness progresses during the teenage years. Bipolar disorder is also known as manic-depressive illness.

"The brain changes were diminished in persons with bipolar disorder who were taking mood-stabilizing medications," said Hilary Blumberg, M.D., associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and director of Yale's Mood Disorders Research Program. "This brings hope that it may someday be possible to halt the progression of the disorder."

Blumberg added, "Research to understand bipolar disorder in youths is especially important because of their high risk for suicide."

Bipolar disorder is characterized by episodes that range from emotional highs, or manias, to emotional lows, or depressions. Extreme manic highs can be associated with over-spending, impulsiveness on the job or at school, and risky behaviors, including sexual indiscretions that can lead to loss of important relationships. Blumberg said in depressive episodes individuals may "take to bed" or, in severe cases, try to take their own lives.
 

- Biological Psychiatry: Published online January 20, 2006
 

www.yale.edu

 
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The research was conducted at Yale in collaboration with co-authors John Krystal, M.D., Ravi Bansal, Andrés Martin, M.D., James Dziura, Kathleen Durkin, Laura Martin, Elizabeth Gerard, M.D., Dennis Charney, M.D., and Bradley Peterson, M.D.

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