XML Feed for RxPG News   Add RxPG News Headlines to My Yahoo!   Javascript Syndication for RxPG News

Research Health World General
 
  Home
 
 Latest Research
 Cancer
 Psychiatry
  Depression
  Neuropsychiatry
  Personality Disorders
  Bulimia
  Anxiety
  Substance Abuse
  Suicide
  CFS
  Psychoses
   Bipolar Disorder
   Schizophrenia
  Child Psychiatry
  Learning-Disabilities
  Psychology
  Forensic Psychiatry
  Mood Disorders
  Sleep Disorders
  Peri-Natal Psychiatry
  Psychotherapy
  Anorexia Nervosa
 Genetics
 Surgery
 Aging
 Ophthalmology
 Gynaecology
 Neurosciences
 Pharmacology
 Cardiology
 Obstetrics
 Infectious Diseases
 Respiratory Medicine
 Pathology
 Endocrinology
 Immunology
 Nephrology
 Gastroenterology
 Biotechnology
 Radiology
 Dermatology
 Microbiology
 Haematology
 Dental
 ENT
 Environment
 Embryology
 Orthopedics
 Metabolism
 Anaethesia
 Paediatrics
 Public Health
 Urology
 Musculoskeletal
 Clinical Trials
 Physiology
 Biochemistry
 Cytology
 Traumatology
 Rheumatology
 
 Medical News
 Health
 Opinion
 Healthcare
 Professionals
 Launch
 Awards & Prizes
 
 Careers
 Medical
 Nursing
 Dental
 
 Special Topics
 Euthanasia
 Ethics
 Evolution
 Odd Medical News
 Feature
 
 World News
 Tsunami
 Epidemics
 Climate
 Business
Search

Last Updated: Aug 19th, 2006 - 22:18:38

Bipolar Disorder Channel
subscribe to Bipolar Disorder newsletter

Latest Research : Psychiatry : Psychoses : Bipolar Disorder

   DISCUSS   |   EMAIL   |   PRINT
New Treatment Model for Bipolar Disorder Shows Promise
Aug 11, 2006, 20:09, Reviewed by: Dr. Anita Dhanrajani

“We now have results from more than 700 patients, cared for in very different health systems, that show this collaborative approach works,”

 
A new care model for bipolar disorder tested in veterans across the nation reduced their manic episodes and improved their quality of life, according to research led by a psychiatrist with the Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Brown Medical School.

The randomized, controlled trial also showed that the model did not add to the treatment costs for bipolar disorder, which affects nearly 6 million American adults a year. Results appear in two reports published in Psychiatric Services, a journal of the American Psychiatric Association.

“We applied the same symptom management approaches found in interventions for diabetes and asthma to the treatment of bipolar disorder and found that people with serious mental illness can help take control of their care,” said Mark S. Bauer, M.D., staff psychiatrist with the Providence V.A. Medical Center and professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown Medical School. “This finding should reduce the stigma of helplessness that so often is associated with these disorders, and it will open new avenues for the treatment of bipolar disorder.”

Bauer oversaw the clinical trial and is the lead author of both journal articles.

The new model was developed and tested in veterans with bipolar disorder at the Providence V.A. Medical Center. During the trial, 306 veterans were enrolled at 11 V.A. centers located in Arizona, California, Colorado, Georgia, Indiana, Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee and Texas. Each veteran was randomly assigned to a study group. One group got usual care through their psychiatrist. The other group received treatment under the new model.

Developed by Bauer and colleagues, the model brings together psychiatrists and nurses as a team to treat the patients. Psychiatrists monitored symptoms and handled medications. Nurse care coordinators worked with veterans during group education sessions.

During the weekly group sessions, nurses discussed topics such as medication side effects and early warning signs for symptoms, which in bipolar disorder range from racing speech, bursts of optimism and impulsive behavior during manic episodes to fatigue, social withdrawal and suicidal thoughts during depressive episodes. During the sessions, patients discussed coping skills, got feedback from the group and created personal action plans.

The intervention was tested for three years. The results: Under the new model, patients saw a significant reduction in symptoms, including five fewer weeks experiencing mania during the three-year study period. Patients also felt happier and healthier, reporting more productive time at work, better relationships with family, and more satisfaction with their care.

The new model was less expensive – an average of $61,398 for three years of direct treatment costs compared with $64,379 for usual care – although the difference was not statistically significant.

“The bottom line is that we saw improvements in patients’ symptoms, function and quality of life with no change in net costs,” Bauer said.

The results mirror those from a simultaneous trial testing a similar team-based approach for bipolar disorder that Bauer also helped to develop. That approach was tested in 441 patients enrolled in a Washington state health maintenance organization. Results from that trial were published in May in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

“We now have results from more than 700 patients, cared for in very different health systems, that show this collaborative approach works,” Bauer said. “Just like anyone with a chronic illness, people with bipolar disorder can work with medical professionals to manage their symptoms and manage their lives.”
 

- Results appear in Psychiatric Services.
 

www.brown.edu

 
Subscribe to Bipolar Disorder Newsletter
E-mail Address:

 

The Department of Veterans Affairs’ Cooperative Studies Program funded the work.

Related Bipolar Disorder News

New Treatment Model for Bipolar Disorder Shows Promise
Youth with bipolar disorder misread facial expressions as hostile
Brain Changes Indicating Bipolar Disorder Are Not Prominent Until Adulthood
Manic-depressive illness and the FAT gene
One in five teens needing inpatient psychiatric care may be manic-depressive
Psychosocial Disability Fluctuates Along with Bipolar Symptoms
BOLDER II (BipOLar DEpRession) study - Quetiapine effective in bipolar depression
Call for accurate screening of bipolar disorder
First study to test antipsychotic on depressive phase
Research zeros in on bipolar disorder genes


For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 

© Copyright 2004 onwards by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited
Contact Us