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Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Research Article
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Limited Exercise Useful for Obese Women

May 16, 2007 - 3:48:06 AM , Reviewed by: Dr. Venkat Yelamanchili
“Perhaps the most striking finding of our study is that even activity at approximately 72 min/wk over about three days was associated with a significant improvement in fitness compared with women in the nonexercise control group,”

Level of Evidence
1b - Individual Randomised Control Trial
 
Main results
In this study, previously sedentary, overweight or obese postmenopausal women experienced a graded dose-response change in fitness across levels of exercise training.
[RxPG] New research indicates that even small amounts of physical activity, approximately 75 minutes a week, can help improve the fitness levels for postmenopausal women who are sedentary and overweight or obese, according to a study in the May 16 issue of JAMA.

Low levels of cardiorespiratory fitness are associated with high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death, and improvements in fitness are associated with a reduction in these risks. Physical activity habits are the primary determinant of fitness in adults and changes in physical activity result in changes in fitness, according to background information in the article. However, there is a poor understanding of the relationship between levels of physical activity and the change in fitness levels.

Timothy S. Church, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., of the Louisiana State University System, Baton Rouge, La., and colleagues examined the effect of 50 percent, 100 percent, and 150 percent of the NIH Consensus Panel physical activity recommendations on cardiorespiratory fitness in sedentary, overweight or obese postmenopausal women with elevated blood pressure. The Panel recommends at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on most, preferably all, days of the week. The study included 464 sedentary, postmenopausal overweight or obese women whose body mass index ranged from 25.0 to 43.0 and whose systolic blood pressure ranged from 120.0 to 159.9 mm Hg. Enrollment took place between April 2001 and June 2005.

Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: 102 to the nonexercise control group, 155 to the 4-kcal/kg (400 calories), 104 to the 8-kcal/kg (800 calories), and 103 to the 12-kcal/kg (1,200 calories) per week energy-expenditure groups for the 6-month intervention period. Target training intensity was the heart rate associated with 50 percent (a modest intensity) of each woman’s peak VO2 (a measure of oxygen consumption and fitness level).

The average minutes of exercising per week were 72.2 for the 4-kcal/kg, 135.8 for the 8-kcal/kg, and 191.7 for the 12-kcal/kg per week exercise groups. Compared with the control group, the VO2abs (absolute) increased by 4.2 percent in the 4-kcal/kg, 6.0 percent in the 8-kcal/kg, and 8.2 percent in the 12-kcal/kg per week groups. There were no significant changes in systolic or diastolic blood pressure values from baseline to 6 months in any of the exercise groups vs. the control group.

“Perhaps the most striking finding of our study is that even activity at the 4-kcal/kg per week level [approximately 72 min/wk over about three days] was associated with a significant improvement in fitness compared with women in the nonexercise control group,” the authors write. “This information can be used to support future recommendations and should be encouraging to sedentary adults who find it difficult to find the time for 150 minutes of activity per week, let alone 60 minutes per day.”


Original research article: http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/297/19/2081 
Publication: May 16 issue of JAMA 
On the web: JAMA . 2007;297:2081-2091 

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 About Dr. Venkat Yelamanchili
This news story has been reviewed by Dr. Venkat Yelamanchili before its publication on RxPG News website. Dr. Venkata Yelamanchili , MBBS is a editor of RxPG News. In his capacity as the editor, he is responsible for content related to latest research news in psychiatry. His areas of special interest are General Psychiatry and Therapeutic communities.
RxPG News is committed to promotion and implementation of Evidence Based Medical Journalism in all channels of mass media including internet.
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