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Latest Research : Pharmacology
  Last Updated: Nov 2, 2013 - 11:52:55 AM

Latest Research
Palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases in elderly patients improves quality of life
Geneva, Switzerland: Giving palliative radiotherapy to elderly patients with painful bone metastases can significantly improve their quality of life, a Dutch researcher told the 2nd Forum of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) today (Monday).
Apr 22, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Research shows promise for microwave ablation to relieve painful bone and soft-tissue tumors
April 11, 2013, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- First-of-its-kind research presented today showed microwave ablation (MWA) therapy cut pain in half for patients with painful bone and soft-tissue tumors and took less time to complete than radiofrequency ablation. Pain relief lasted over 4 months on average and up to 15 months in some patients, according to results reported at the 29th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine.
Apr 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Experimental study suggests bone-marrow grafts show promise for some sufferers of low-back pain
April 11, 2013, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- A new study suggests that the type of bio-cellular grafts increasingly used by surgeons to repair damaged tissue may be useful for treating low-back pain (LBP). However, not all sufferers responded equally to the novel therapy. Results reported today at the 29th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine ranged from complete pain relief to no improvement.
Apr 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Study suggests dexmedetomidine before surgery reduced remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia
April 11, 2013, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- Surgical patients who demonstrated heightened pain sensitivity, or hyperalgesia, induced by high doses of a synthetic opioid had their symptoms alleviated by co-treatment with dexmedetomidine, according to new research. Study investigators, who presented their results today at the 29th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine, concluded that dexmedetomidine may be a new and effective treatment option for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH).
Apr 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Research examines effects of opioids on patients with sickle cell disease
April 11, 2013, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- Researchers from Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) sought to shed light on the biopsychosocial and spiritual effects of taking prescribed opioids to treat noncancer pain. Such questions have received little examination and impact the challenging decision of when and how to use opioids, the study authors wrote in a scientific poster presented today at the 29th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. They found that taking opioids had many and diverse consequences for patients in terms of biological, psychological, social and spiritual functioning.
Apr 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Full range of treatment settings and their effects on radiofrequency heat lesion size
April 11, 2013, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- Changing the parameters used to deliver radiofrequency (RF) treatment greatly affects the size of the resulting heat lesion, researchers reported today in a study expected to deliver greater precision and more treatment options in interventional pain management. Results were presented at the 29th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine.
Apr 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
High-dose opioids disturb hormones long-term, but mental and physiologic function improves
April 11, 2013, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- Half of patients on high-dose, long-term opioid therapy had hormonal disturbances or signs of inflammation, while 100 percent reported improved pain control and mental outlook, new research shows. The results, reported today at the 29th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine, present rare data on the effects of opioids beyond 10 years. Most clinical trials that examine opioid use are of short duration, and little is known about long-term outcomes, particularly in patients who suffer from noncancer pain.
Apr 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Web-based tools found to enhance recruitment and prescreening for clinical pain trials
April 11, 2013, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- Researchers are suggesting new ways to use existing Internet tools to recruit more study participants for clinical pain trials and to increase the likelihood they will remain throughout the study period. An innovative website allowed recruiters to reach out broadly to target and recruit potential subjects and to avoid many of the common difficulties of pain research, according to results presented today at the 29th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine.
Apr 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Experimental study suggests bone-marrow grafts show promise for some sufferers of low-back pain
April 11, 2013, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- A new study suggests that the type of bio-cellular grafts increasingly used by surgeons to repair damaged tissue may be useful for treating low-back pain (LBP). However, not all sufferers responded equally to the novel therapy. Results reported today at the 29th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine ranged from complete pain relief to no improvement.
Apr 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Study: Pain improves during first year but mental-health problems linger
April 11, 2013, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- Veterans who sustained major limb injuries during combat reported little improvement in symptoms of depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental-health problems up to 2 years post injury, according to research presented today. In contrast, pain showed the most improvement 3-6 months after acute hospitalization, and then leveled off after 1 year. The investigative team, led by Rollin M. Gallagher, MD, MPH, reported results during a poster session at the 29th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Pain Medicine.
Apr 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New techniques reduce the complications of spinal cord stimulator implant
April 11, 2013, Fort Lauderdale, Fla. -- Two innovative techniques in the placement of an implanted spinal cord stimulator (SCS) are expected to reduce common complications at the implant site, according to new research revealed today. Results from a case series highlighted an advanced lead anchoring technique and the emerging technology of using large single-port introducers, which enable placement of multiple neurostimulation leads through a single needle-entry point.
Apr 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Anaesthetists' research network to create buzz at national conference
A research network established by a network of training anaesthetists in the South West of England, and which in just nine months has become one of the most successful of its kind in the UK, is set to create a buzz at the national Group of Anaesthetists in Training (GAT) annual scientific meeting in Oxford.
Apr 3, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Nerve damage may underlie widespread, unexplained chronic pain in children
Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have described what may be a newly identified disease that appears to explain some cases of widespread chronic pain and other symptoms in children and young adults. Their report that will appear in the April issue of the journal Pediatrics, and has received early online release, finds that most of a group of young patients seen at the MGH for chronic, unexplained pain had test results indicating small-fiber polyneuropathy, a condition not previously reported in children. The MGH investigators call this new syndrome juvenile-onset small-fiber polyneuropathy or JOSeFINE.
Mar 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
NIH clinical trial begins for treatment of rare, fatal neurological disorder
A clinical trial to evaluate a drug candidate called cyclodextrin as a possible treatment for Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC), a rare and fatal genetic disease, will start today, researchers announced. Scientists from the NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) will conduct the clinical trial at the NIH Clinical Center. Reaching this trial stage required collaboration among government, industry, patient advocacy groups and academic researchers.
Jan 23, 2013 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Moderate coffee consumption may reduce risk of diabetes by up to 25 percent
Drinking three to four cups of coffee per day may help to prevent type 2 diabetes according to research highlighted in a session report published by the Institute for Scientific Information on Coffee (ISIC), a not-for-profit organisation devoted to the study and disclosure of science related to coffee and health.
Dec 4, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
'Walking on marbles' could be a thing of the past for arthritis patients
Researchers at the University of Southampton are to undertake a new stage of a study aimed at improving the health and mobility of those suffering from the common complaint of 'walking on marbles' associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) in the feet.
Nov 27, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Hospital-based exercise programs benefit people with osteoarthritis
A low-cost exercise program run by Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City has significantly improved pain, function and quality of life in participants with osteoarthritis, according to new research.
Nov 10, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Lower-income patients fare better than wealthier after knee replacement, mayo finds
WASHINGTON -- Patients who make $35,000 a year or less report better outcomes after knee replacement surgery than people who earn more, research by Mayo Clinic and the University of Alabama at Birmingham shows. The lower-income patients studied reported less pain and better knee function at their two-year checkups than wealthier people did. The study was being presented at the American College of Rheumatology annual meeting in Washington.
Nov 10, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Low vitamin D level is linked to greater chance of risk factors for Type 2 diabetes
A new study presents more evidence of a possible link between low vitamin D levels and a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The results will be presented Saturday at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.
Jun 25, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Liraglutide with insulin improves poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes
Obese adults with poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes can better control their blood sugar by adding liraglutide, a Type 2 diabetes drug, to their insulin therapy, a new study finds. The results, which will be presented Sunday at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston, also found that these diabetic patients lost weight and lowered their blood pressure.
Jun 24, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Risk score could lead to better diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome in children
Researchers have developed a new scoring system that may better identify adolescents with the metabolic syndrome, a group at increased risk of later developing Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The study, to be presented Sunday at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston, describes what the authors call the first racial/ethnic-specific and sex-specific scoring system for the metabolic syndrome.
Jun 24, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Exercise with diet improves insulin sensitivity much more than diet alone
Obese older adults can reduce their chance of developing the metabolic syndrome by losing weight through dieting alone, but adding exercise to a weight loss program has even more benefit, a new study finds. The results, to be presented Saturday at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston, show that a combination of diet-induced weight loss and frequent exercise almost doubled the improvement in insulin sensitivity compared with dieting alone.
Jun 23, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
NIH selects 11 Centers of Excellence in Pain Education
The National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium has selected 11 health professional schools as designated Centers of Excellence in Pain Education (CoEPEs). The CoEPEs will act as hubs for the development, evaluation, and distribution of pain management curriculum resources for medical, dental, nursing and pharmacy schools to enhance and improve how health care professionals are taught about pain and its treatment. Twenty institutes, centers and offices at NIH are involved in the consortium.
May 21, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
BUSM study demonstrates tomosynthesis effective in diagnosing knee osteoarthritis
(Boston) - A recent study done by researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) shows that tomosynthesis may be more beneficial in diagnosing knee osteoarthritis than X-ray imaging. In the study, which is published online in the journal Radiology, tomosynthesis detected more osteophytes (abnormal bony spurs) and subchondral cysts (small collection of fluid within the bone) in the knee joint than conventional X-ray imaging.
Mar 21, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Moderate drinking associated with lower risk of stroke in women
Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption has been consistently associated with lower risk of heart disease, but data for stroke are less certain, especially among women.
Mar 15, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Pain relief: Poor evidence for non-drug approaches in labor
There is better evidence for the effectiveness of drug-based approaches for relieving labour pains than non-drug approaches. These are the findings of an all-encompassing publishing in The Cochrane Library, which draws together results from a number of previous reviews on the subject.
Mar 13, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Muscle relaxants and neuromodulators for managing RA pain: Many options, but no clear successes
Pain management is a high priority for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, so three researchers in Australia analysed existing study data to see whether two different classes of drugs can help. When looking at muscle relaxants, they discovered that neither the benzodiazepine agents, diazepam and triazolam, nor the non- benzodiazepine agent, zopiclone, reduce pain when taken for one to 14 days. However, even this short use was associated for both agents with drowsiness and dizziness.
Jan 17, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Opioid abuse linked to mood and anxiety disorders
Individuals suffering from mood and anxiety disorders such as bipolar, panic disorder and major depressive disorder may be more likely to abuse opioids, according to a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. They found that mood and anxiety disorders are highly associated with non-medical prescription opioid use. The results are featured in a recent issue of the Journal of Psychological Medicine.
Dec 13, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Why women quit breast cancer drugs early
CHICAGO --- Why do so many postmenopausal women who are treated for estrogen-sensitive breast cancer quit using drugs that help prevent the disease from recurring?
Dec 9, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Psoriasis is associated with impaired HDL function, Penn study finds
Orlando - Collaborative research from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has shown that psoriasis patients have an increased risk of heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular death, especially if the psoriasis is moderate to severe. Now, Penn researchers have discovered the potential underlying mechanism by which the inflammatory skin disease impacts cardiovascular health. In two new studies presented at the 2011 American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, Penn researchers show that the systemic inflammatory impact of psoriasis may alter both the makeup of cholesterol particles and numbers, as well as impair the function of high density lipoprotein (HDL), the good cholesterol.
Nov 16, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
FDA funds Rochester researchers to give chronic and acute pain clinical trials a makeover
For chronic pain sufferers, a day can feel like a year and a year can feel like an eternity. With very few truly new therapies approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for this condition since 2005, the outlook is far from bright.
Nov 14, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
NYU College of Nursing receives 450 thousand dollar NIH grant to research post-breast cancer lymphedema
New York University College of Nursing (NYUCN) received a two-year, $452,218.00 grant from the national Institutes of Health (NIH) to research Proinflammatory Biomarkers and Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema. Post-breast cancer lymphedema (LE), a syndrome of abnormal swelling and multiple distressing symptoms, is caused by injuries to the lymphatic system from cancer treatment. As advances in cancer treatment lengthen survival, LE has emerged as a high-impact long-term morbidity that profoundly impairs survivors' quality of life.
Oct 27, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Remitting multiple sclerosis: Natalizumab reduces relapses and disability
Taking the new generation anti-inflammatory drug natalizumab for two years lowers the number of remitting multiple sclerosis patients who experience relapses and progression of disability. This is the main finding of a systematic review published in the latest edition of The Cochrane Library.
Oct 4, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
The mark of the beast: tradition or stress?
For a variety of reasons it is important to be able to identify farm animals, horses and small companion animals. Farm animals have generally been marked by branding with hot irons or by ear-tagging, while more recently dogs and cats are being uniquely identified by the implant of a microchip transponder. Horses have traditionally been branded but many countries are now moving towards the use of microchips. Branding is still permitted in Austria and Germany, although the German parliament is currently discussing following the lead of Denmark, which banned the practice in 2009. Similar discussions are taking place in the USA and Australia. The underlying belief is that the use of microchips is more humane but is this really the case? The group of Christine Aurich at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna) has now shown that the short-term differences are far less dramatic than animal rights activists may have us believe but that hot-iron branding has prolonged effects that may negatively affect the welfare of the foals.
Sep 28, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Back pain? Move, don't rest!
Move if you have back pain, this is the advice of a researcher at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg. Patients with acute low back pain who were advised to stay active despite the pain fared better than those who were told to adjust their activity in line with their pain.
Sep 19, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Pain relief can now be based on solid evidence
A Cochrane Review of data relating to about 45,000 patients involved in approximately 350 individual studies has provided an evaluation of the effect you can expect to get if you take commonly used painkillers at specific doses. The review also identifies pain killers for which there is only poor or no reliable evidence. This review will help doctors and patients to make evidence informed decisions of which pain killers to use, and is published in the latest edition of The Cochrane Library.
Sep 6, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Physiotherapy
Achieving realistic physical activity goals benefits RA patients
Researchers from The Netherlands report that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have higher levels of self-efficacy for physical activity are more likely to achieve their physical activity goals. According to the study now available in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), achievement of physical activity goals is associated with lower self-reported arthritis pain and increased health-related quality of life (HRQOL).
Aug 25, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
To help doctors and patients, UB researchers are developing a 'vocabulary of pain'
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- All over the world, patients with chronic pain struggle to express how they feel to the doctors and health-care providers who are trying to understand and treat them. Now, a University at Buffalo psychiatrist is attempting to help patients suffering from chronic pain and their doctors by drawing on ontology, the branch of philosophy concerned with the nature of being or existence. The research will be discussed during a tutorial he will give at the International Conference on Biomedical Ontology (
Jul 26, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Physiotherapy
Physiotherapy after surgery best for shoulder problems
Most patients who receive physiotherapy after surgery experience that pain is reduced by a half within a few months. Most of them are free of pain after one to two years. This is the conclusion of a thesis presented at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Jun 21, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
The association of alcohol drinking with migraine headache
Migraine is a neurovascular disease that affects about 15% of the western population. Compounds in foods and beverages (chocolate, wine, citrus, etc) considered as migraine triggers include tyramine, phenylethylamine and possibly histamine and phenolic compounds. Avoiding those triggers may significantly reduce the frequency of migraines in some patients.
Jun 13, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
NIH stops clinical trial on combination cholesterol treatment
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health has stopped a clinical trial studying a blood lipid treatment 18 months earlier than planned. The trial found that adding high dose, extended-release niacin to statin treatment in people with heart and vascular disease, did not reduce the risk of cardiovascular events, including heart attacks and stroke.
May 26, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New test could give SLE patients a more tolerable life
At present, it can take up to a year before a patient is diagnosed with SLE. This is because the symptoms are diffuse and are often mistaken for other diseases. However, with this blood-based test, it is possible to determine quickly whether someone has the disease or not, says Christer Wingren, associate professor in Immunotechnology at CREATE Health, Lund University.
May 9, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Mount Sinai researchers present critical MS data at American Academy of Neurology meeting
Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine will present several key studies at the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) annual meeting, including research providing critical insight into the prognosis and clinical treatment course of people with a certain subtype of Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The meeting is taking place April 9-16 in Honolulu.
Apr 14, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Biotechnology : Nanotechnology
Nanostructures lend cutting edge to antibiotics
London, April 4 - Arming antibiotic drugs with nanostructures would make them much more effective in targeting infected cells.
Apr 5, 2011 - 3:25:22 PM

Latest Research
Learning from old bones to treat modern back pain
The bones of people who died up to a hundred years ago are being used in the development of new treatments for chronic back pain. It is the first time old bones have been used in this way.
Feb 28, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Ion channel responsible for pain identified by UB neuroscientists
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- University at Buffalo neuroscience researchers conducting basic research on ion channels have demonstrated a process that could have a profound therapeutic impact on pain.
Dec 17, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Laboratory studies show promise for new multiple sclerosis treatment
Successfully treating and reversing the effects of multiple sclerosis, or MS, may one day be possible using a drug originally developed to treat chronic pain, according to Distinguished Professor Linda Watkins of the University of Colorado at Boulder.
Nov 18, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
National research study to assess new treatment for painful vertebral fractures
Physicians at The Medical College of Wisconsin are conducting the KAST clinical trial at Froedtert Hospital to assess the safety and effectiveness of a new vertebral augmentation treatment (Kiva) for painful vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) due to osteoporosis.
Oct 28, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Cholesterol-lowering drug shrinks enlarged prostates in hamster model
Boston, Mass. - A cholesterol-lowering drug reduced the enlarged prostates of hamsters to the same extent as a drug commonly used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), report researchers at Children's Hospital Boston and their colleagues in the October issue of the Journal of Urology. Together, the drugs worked even better.
Oct 21, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New drugs to relieve cancer pain
Researchers at the University of Leicester and the University of Ferrara in Italy have collaborated to develop new drugs which have the potential to relieve cancer pain without causing many of the side effects of current pain-treatments like morphine.
Jun 21, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

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