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Health : Food & Nutrition
  Last Updated: Nov 2, 2013 - 11:52:55 AM

Latest Research
Gathering information about food is not top priority for individuals with high metabolisms
New research has revealed that individuals with the highest metabolic rates within populations should be the least pre-occupied with keeping track of changes in their environments that could lead them to sources of food. Individuals with slower or average metabolisms however should be constantly monitoring their opportunities for higher gain when they are looking for food. The study shows that variation in metabolic rates between individuals can explain dramatic differences in information use when it comes to food.
Oct 1, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
DHA-enriched formula in infancy linked to positive cognitive outcomes in childhood
LAWRENCE - University of Kansas scientists have found that infants who were fed formula enriched with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) from birth to 12 months scored significantly better than a control group on several measures of intelligence conducted between the ages of three to six years.
Aug 13, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New IOM report lays out plan to determine effectiveness of obesity prevention efforts
WASHINGTON -- The United States lags behind other international plans to evaluate obesity prevention efforts, and the country needs to know whether these efforts are having their intended impact, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. The committee that wrote the report concluded that more systematic and routine evaluations could help determine how well obesity prevention programs and policies are being implemented and which interventions work best. The committee also recommended specific national and community plans for evaluation of obesity prevention efforts.
Aug 2, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Vitamin D supplementation may delay precocious puberty in girls
SAN FRANCISCO-- Vitamin D supplementation may help delay early onset of puberty in girls, a new clinical study finds. The results were presented Monday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.
Jun 17, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Study: Pedometer program helps motivate participants to sit less, move more
Indiana University researchers found that a simple program that uses pedometers to monitor how much people move throughout the day was effective at increasing physical activity, decreasing sitting time, a particular problem for office workers, and helping participants drop some pounds.
May 30, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Fish oil may stall effects of junk food on brain
Data from more than 180 research papers suggests fish oils could minimise the effects that junk food can have on the brain, a review by researchers at the University of Liverpool has shown.
May 14, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Health : Food & Nutrition
Intake of low energy dense food better than skipping meals
Results of a study show that dieting characterized by meal skipping and fasting would be less successful than weight loss efforts characterized by intake of low energy dense healthy foods.


May 2, 2013 - 10:05:10 PM

Latest Research
Inaugural IOF Olof Johnell Science Award presented to Professor Harry Genant
Harry Genant, Professor Emeritus of the University of California San Francisco, has been named the winner of the International Osteoporosis Foundation's (IOF) first Olof Johnell Science Award.
Apr 18, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Molecular hub links obesity, heart disease to high blood pressure
Obesity, heart disease, and high blood pressure (hypertension) are all related, but understanding the molecular pathways that underlie cause and effect is complicated.
Apr 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Youth with type 1 diabetes may suffer health risks when transitioning from pediatric to adult care
AURORA, Colo. (March 26, 2013) Adolescent type 1 diabetes patients face greater risk for heart attacks, strokes, blindness and kidney failure later in life if their transition from pediatric to adult care is not carefully managed, two CU researchers have found. The estimated median age at transition to adult care was 20.1 years and 77 percent of individuals with type 1 diabetes had left pediatric care by age 21. The study suggests that without support, they were 2.5 times more likely to have high blood glucose levels when transitioning from pediatric to adult care
Mar 26, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Promoting poultry health through diet
URBANA -- Developing strategies to increase the amount of saleable product while reducing dietary inputs is a priority for animal scientists. University of Illinois researchers have been looking at how dietary components affect gut health and disease resistance in chickens.
Feb 25, 2013 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Creeping epidemic of obesity hits Asia Pacific region
Sophia Antipolis, 21 February 2013: Over eating, sedentary lifestyles, cultural attitudes, and lack of prevention programmes are to blame for the rising epidemic of obesity in the Asia Pacific region. Overweight and obesity has quadrupled in China and societies still label people of healthy weight as poor.
Feb 20, 2013 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
NOAA adds red tide alerts to Beach Hazards Statements
NOAA has added a new service to alert the public when red tides threaten human health at Tampa Bay area beaches. The new alert is timely since many of southwest Florida's beaches are experiencing or are under threat of red tide.
Feb 4, 2013 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
University-developed omega-3-rich ground beef available soon
MANHATTAN, Kan. -- Thanks to Kansas State University research, part of a healthy diet can include a hamburger rich with omega-3 fatty acids.
Feb 4, 2013 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Iron deficiency and cognitive development: New insights from piglets
University of Illinois researchers have developed a model that uses neonatal piglets for studying infant brain development and its effect on learning and memory. To determine if the model is nutrient-sensitive, they have done some research on the effects of iron-deficient diets.
Dec 3, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Feeding the world fairly
Fair access to good food is a challenge as old as civilization, and failing to meet it contributed to the fall of the French monarchy ('let them eat cake'), Babylon, Athens and the Roman Empire. As the global populace climbs toward an expected nine billion by 2050, an $800,000 grant from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation will fund collaborative work by three divisions of Johns Hopkins University to develop ethical guidelines to help meet the challenge in our day.
Nov 29, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Michael Barnett of Boston College named Professor of the Year for Massachusetts
Boston College Lynch School of Education Associate Professor of Science Education and Technology G. Michael Barnett has been named the 2012 Massachusetts Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) in recognition of his teaching excellence and positive influence on the lives and careers of students. It is the only national program that recognizes excellence in undergraduate teaching and mentoring.
Nov 20, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Limiting carbs to dinner reduces diabetes and cardiovascular risks
An experimental diet with carbohydrates eaten mostly at dinner could benefit people suffering from severe and morbid obesity, according to new research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Nov 11, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Secondary osteoporosis: More than what meets the eye!
An SGH study has revealed that considering all osteoporotic patients as having simple osteoporosis and treating all of them alike by putting them on potent long term medication without finding out the cause of their osteoporosis may be ineffective and in most cases downright harmful.
Oct 9, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Musculoskeletal Health Roundtable recommends action to sustain active and healthy aging
The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and the Cyprus Society Against Osteoporosis and Musculoskeletal Diseases today hosted an event in Nicosia, Cyprus to call attention to the importance of musculoskeletal health for Europe's growing population of senior citizens.
Sep 6, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
From textbook to flexbook: Professor uses new collaborative tool in the classroom
MANHATTAN, KAN. -- A Kansas State University professor is gaining attention for creating a textbook replacement that saves students money and provides instructors with teaching flexibility.
Aug 13, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
UIC study examines exercise and weight loss for older adults with osteoarthritis
The University of Illinois at Chicago has been awarded a $3 million grant to study the effectiveness of two community-based health promotion programs for older adults with osteoarthritis.
Aug 9, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Piglets in mazes provide insights into human cognitive development
URBANA -- Events that take place early in life almost certainly have consequences for later cognitive development. Establishing the connections is difficult, however, because human infants cannot be used as laboratory subjects.
Jul 25, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Helping pigs to digest phosphorus
URBANA -- Phosphorus is a vital nutrient for pig growth, but pigs do not always digest it well. Research conducted at the University of Illinois has determined how adding various levels of the enzyme phytase to the diet improves how pigs digest the phosphorus in four different feed ingredients. Improving phosphorus digestibility has positive implications for producers' bottom lines as well as for the environment.
Jul 17, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Rising carbon dioxide in atmosphere also speeds carbon loss from forest soils, IU-led research finds
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide accelerate carbon cycling and soil carbon loss in forests, new research led by an Indiana University biologist has found.
Jul 10, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Long-term calcium and vitamin D supplement use may be linked to increased risk of kidney stones
Calcium and vitamin D supplements are associated with high calcium levels in the blood and urine, which could increase the risk of kidney stones, a new study finds. The results will be presented Tuesday at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.
Jun 26, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Treating vitamin D deficiency may improve depression
Women with moderate to severe depression had substantial improvement in their symptoms of depression after they received treatment for their vitamin D deficiency, a new study finds. The case report series will be presented Saturday at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.
Jun 25, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Low vitamin D level is linked to greater chance of risk factors for Type 2 diabetes
A new study presents more evidence of a possible link between low vitamin D levels and a higher risk of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The results will be presented Saturday at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.
Jun 25, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Finding ways to feed pigs for less
Results of a preliminary experiment conducted at the University of Illinois indicate that it may be possible to select pigs that can make efficient use of energy in less expensive feed ingredients, thus reducing diet costs.
Jun 7, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Health : Food & Nutrition
Turmeric lowers post operative risk of a heart attack
Turmeric may help lower heart attack risk in people post bypass surgery, thanks to curcumin, the yellow pigment present in the spice which has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.
Apr 17, 2012 - 3:40:02 PM

Latest Research
Approach to diabetes self-management too narrow, study suggests
A new study from researchers at Queen Mary, University of London reveals the many difficulties faced by people with diabetes in self-managing their disease.
Apr 10, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Best time for a coffee break? There's an app for that
Caffeinated drinks such as coffee and soda are the pick-me-ups of choice for many people, but too much caffeine can cause nervousness and sleep problems.
Feb 14, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Gene related to fat preferences in humans found
A preference for fatty foods has a genetic basis, according to researchers, who discovered that people with certain forms of the CD36 gene may like high-fat foods more than those who have other forms of this gene.
Feb 3, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Eating smart: Researcher studies foods, dietary supplements that may reduce risk of prostate cancer
MANHATTAN, KAN. -- A Kansas State University professor is turning to nutrition to tackle prostate cancer.
Jan 23, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Research aims to prevent obesity by reaching parents, young children through child care
MANHATTAN, KAN. -- A Kansas State University research group is jumping ahead to improve nutrition and physical activity among young children and prevent childhood obesity.
Nov 16, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
AMD-like lesions delayed in mice fed lower glycemic index diet
BOSTON (November 14, 2011) -- Feeding older mice a lower glycemic index (GI) diet consisting of slowly-digested carbohydrates delays the onset of age-related, sight-threatening retinal lesions, according to a new study from the Laboratory for Nutrition and Vision Research at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University.
Nov 14, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Sugar-sweetened beverages may increase cardiovascular risk in women
Drinking two or more sugar-sweetened beverages a day may expand a woman's waistline and increase her risk of heart disease and diabetes, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011.
Nov 13, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Low vitamin C levels may raise heart failure patients' risk
Low levels of vitamin C were associated with higher levels of high sensitivity C-Reactive protein (hsCRP) and shorter intervals without major cardiac issues or death for heart failure patients, in research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011.
Nov 13, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
UT study: Climate change affects ants and biodiversity
Some people may consider them pests, but ants are key to many plants' survival.
Nov 2, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
On the menu: Research helps future restaurant managers reach out to customers with food allergies
MANHATTAN, KAN. -- A Kansas State University research team is serving up improved food allergy education for future restaurant managers and staff.
Oct 5, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Frequently used weight-loss method is light on evidence
Although the transtheoretical model stages of change (TTM SOC) method is frequently used to help obese and overweight people lose weight, a newly published Cochrane systematic review indicates there is little evidence that it is effective. The use of TTM SOC only resulted in 2kg or less weight loss, and there was no conclusive evidence that this loss was sustained, says study leader Nik Tuah, who works at Imperial College London.
Oct 4, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Plant compound reduces breast cancer mortality
Phytoestrogens are plant compounds which, in the human body, can attach to the receptors for the female sexual hormone estrogen and which are taken in with our daily diet. A number of findings have attributed a cancer protective effect to these plant hormones. At DKFZ, a team headed by Prof. Dr. Jenny Chang-Claude summarized the results of several studies in a meta-analysis last year and showed that a diet rich in phytoestrogens lowers the risk of developing breast cancer after menopause. Now the Heidelberg researchers wanted to find out whether phytoestrogens also have an influence on the course of breast cancer. Prior investigations on this topic had provided contradictory results.
Sep 13, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Micronutrient powders reduce anemia and iron deficiency in infants in low-income countries
Adding a powder that contains several vitamins and minerals, including iron, zinc and vitamin A, to the semi-solid foods taken by infants and children between six months and two years of age, can reduce their risk of anaemia and iron deficiency. This is the conclusion of a new Cochrane Systematic Review.
Sep 6, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
CWRU School of Dental Medicine receives $2.6 million in grants
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is supporting pre- and post-doctoral training programs in dental public health at Case Western Reserve University in an effort to combat disparities in oral health.
Aug 22, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Mount Sinai receives $3.4 million for largest study of personalized medicine in the clinical setting
Mount Sinai School of Medicine has been awarded a $3.4 million grant over four years from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to begin the largest study of its kind, in which a patient's genomic risk for disease is revealed in a lab, and then entered into an electronic medical record for use in determining treatment in the clinical care setting.
Aug 18, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Scientists highlight link between stress and appetite
Researchers in the Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) at the University of Calgary's Faculty of Medicine have uncovered a mechanism by which stress increases food drive in rats. This new discovery, published online this week in the journal Neuron, could provide important insight into why stress is thought to be one of the underlying contributors to obesity.
Aug 12, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Scientist urges government ruling on genetically engineered salmon
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -- A Purdue University scientist is urging federal officials to decide whether genetically engineered salmon would be allowed for U.S. consumption and arguing that not doing so may set back scientific efforts to increase food production.
Aug 5, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Mannan oligosaccharides offer health benefits to pigs
Feeding mannan oligosaccharides (MOS) can fine-tune the immune system of pigs, suggests a new University of Illinois study.
Jul 28, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Can soda tax curb obesity?
EVANSTON, Ill. --- To many, a tax on soda is a no-brainer in advancing the nation's war on obesity. Advocates point to a number of studies in recent years that conclude that sugary drinks have a lot to do with why Americans are getting fatter.
Jun 28, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Sport doctors say non-alcoholic wheat beer boosts athletes' health
Many amateur athletes have long suspected what research scientists for the Department of Preventative and Rehabilitative Sports Medicine of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen at Klinikum rechts der Isar have now made official: Documented proof, gathered during the world's largest study of marathons, Be-MaGIC (beer, marathons, genetics, inflammation and the cardiovascular system), that the consumption of non-alcoholic weissbier, or wheat beer, has a positive effect on athletes' health. Under the direction of Dr. Johannes Scherr, physicians examined 277 test subjects three weeks before and two weeks after the 2009 Munich Marathon.
Jun 9, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

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Health  
Gathering information about food is not top priority for individuals with high metabolisms
NIH renews funding for University of Maryland vaccine research
DHA-enriched formula in infancy linked to positive cognitive outcomes in childhood
New IOM report lays out plan to determine effectiveness of obesity prevention efforts
Vitamin D supplementation may delay precocious puberty in girls
Study: Pedometer program helps motivate participants to sit less, move more
Fish oil may stall effects of junk food on brain
Intake of low energy dense food better than skipping meals
Inaugural IOF Olof Johnell Science Award presented to Professor Harry Genant
Molecular hub links obesity, heart disease to high blood pressure
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