RSS Feed for Latest Medical Headlines on RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World

 
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
   Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
  Emergency Medicine
  Internal Medicine
  Respiratory Medicine
  Sexual Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate
Search

Latest Research : Medicine
  Last Updated: Nov 2, 2013 - 11:52:55 AM

Latest Research
Biological therapy with cediranib improves survival in women with recurrent ovarian cancer
Women with ovarian cancer that has recurred after chemotherapy have survived for longer after treatment with a biological therapy called cediranib, according to new results to be presented today (Monday) at the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1].
Sep 30, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Young patients with metastatic colorectal cancer are at high risk of disease progression and death
Younger patients with colorectal cancer that has spread (metastasised) to other parts of the body represent a high-risk group that is less likely to respond to anti-cancer treatments. Their disease is more likely to progress and they are at greater risk of death than other age groups, according to new research to be presented to the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1] today (Sunday).
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Longest follow-up of melanoma patients treated with ipilimumab shows some survive up to 10 years
Patients with advanced melanoma, who have been treated with the monoclonal antibody, ipilimumab, can survive for up to ten years, according to the largest analysis of overall survival for these patients, presented at the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1] today (Saturday).
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Treating chest lymph nodes in early breast cancer patients improves survival
Giving radiation therapy to the lymph nodes located behind the breast bone and above the collar bone to patients with early breast cancer improves overall survival without increasing side effects. This new finding ends the uncertainty about whether the beneficial effect of radiation therapy in such patients was simply the result of irradiation of the breast area, or whether it treated cancer cells in the local lymph nodes as well, the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1] will hear today (Saturday).
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Hyperfractionated radiotherapy improves survival in head and neck cancer patients
The use of an intensified form of radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancers can improve overall survival rates compared with standard radiation therapy, according to results from a large study to be presented today (Saturday) at the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1].
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Colorectal cancer screening works
Screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) in European countries is highly effective in reducing mortality from the disease. Some of the resources currently being devoted to breast and prostate screening programmes, where the evidence of effectiveness is much less clear-cut, should be reallocated to the early detection of CRC, the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1] will hear today (Sunday).
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Drivers who test positive for drugs have triple the risk of a fatal car crash
Drugged driving has been a safety issue of increasing public concern in the United States and many other countries but its role in motor vehicle crashes had not been adequately examined. In a new study conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, researchers assessed the association of driver drug use, as well as the combination of drugs and alcohol, with the risk of fatal crash. They found that drug use is associated with a significantly increased risk of fatal crash involvement, particularly when used in combination with alcohol. The study provides critical data for understanding the joint effect of alcohol and drugs on driving safety.
Sep 25, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
A high price to pay for cheap technology
Rape in war cannot be addressed in isolation. It is deeply embedded in both the local context and that of global proportions. This is one of the conclusions made in a doctoral thesis about eastern Democratic Republic of Congo presented at Uppsala University, Sweden, on 19th September.
Sep 17, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
US faces crisis in cancer care, says new IOM report
WASHINGTON -- Delivery of cancer care in the U.S. is facing a crisis stemming from a combination of factors -- a growing demand for such care, a shrinking oncology work force, rising costs of cancer care, and the complexity of the disease and its treatment, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. The report recommends ways to respond to these challenges and improve cancer care delivery, including by strengthening clinicians' core competencies in caring for patients with cancer, shifting to team-based models of care, and communicating more effectively with patients.
Sep 10, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Better hygiene in wealthy nations may increase Alzheimer's risk
New research has found a very significant relationship between a nation's wealth and hygiene and the Alzheimer's burden on its population. High-income, highly industrialised countries with large urban areas and better hygiene exhibit much higher rates of Alzheimer's.
Sep 4, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Key target responsible for triggering detrimental effects in brain trauma identified
Researchers studying a type of cell found in the trillions in our brain have made an important discovery as to how it responds to brain injury and disease such as stroke. A University of Bristol team has identified proteins which trigger the processes that underlie how astrocyte cells respond to neurological trauma.
Jul 25, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Hospital emergency departments gaining in importance, study finds
Hospital emergency departments play a growing role in the U.S. health care system, accounting for a rising proportion of hospital admissions and serving increasingly as an advanced diagnostic center for primary care physicians, according to a new RAND Corporation study.
May 20, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Study raises concerns that teen athletes continue to play with concussion symptoms
Despite knowing the risk of serious injury from playing football with a concussion, half of high school football players would continue to play if they had a headache stemming from an injury sustained on the field.
May 6, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Mammograms reveal response to common cancer drug
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a method for assessing the effect of tamoxifen, a common drug to prevent the relapse of breast cancer. The key lies in monitoring changes in the proportion of dense tissue, which appears white on a mammogram, during treatment. Women who show a pronounced reduction in breast density during tamoxifen treatment have a fifty per cent reduction in breast cancer mortality. This tool provides doctors with the possibility to assess whether a patient is responding to tamoxifen at an early phase of treatment.
Apr 22, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Most effective PTSD therapies are not being widely used, researchers find
Post-traumatic stress disorder affects nearly 8 million adults in any given year, federal statistics show. Fortunately, clinical research has identified certain psychological interventions that effectively ameliorate the symptoms of PTSD. But most people struggling with PTSD don't receive those treatments, according to a new report published in
Apr 19, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Stressful life events may increase stillbirth risk, NIH network study finds
Pregnant women who experienced financial, emotional, or other personal stress in the year before their delivery had an increased chance of having a stillbirth, say researchers who conducted a National Institutes of Health network study.
Mar 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New centers will lead to enhanced geriatric social work training
The Hartford/GSA National Center on Gerontological Social Work Excellence has chosen the Boston College and the University of Michigan as the locations of the first two Hartford Academic Centers of Excellence in Geriatric Social Work.
Mar 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Nurses can play key role in reducing deaths from world's most common diseases
Nurses and midwives can play a critical role in lessening people's risk of cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes, according to a groundbreaking new report issued by the World Health Organization and co-authored by a UCLA nursing professor.
Mar 19, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Teaching the brain to speak again
Cynthia Thompson, a world-renowned researcher on stroke and brain damage, will discuss her groundbreaking research on aphasia and the neurolinguistic systems it affects Feb. 16 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). An estimated one million Americans suffer from aphasia, affecting their ability to understand and/or produce spoken and/or written language.
Feb 16, 2013 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
The potential of psilocybin to alleviate psychological distress in cancer patients is revealed
Improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of cancers in recent years have led to a marked increase in patients' physical survival rates. While doctors can treat the physical disease, what is not well understood is how best to address the psychological needs of patients with cancer.
Jan 31, 2013 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Gift enables Brown to establish healthy aging initiative
Brown University's Program in Public Health has received a gift from the Irene Diamond Fund to launch a major initiative on healthy aging. The program will work on identifying opportunities for preventive health interventions that can reduce care costs and improve the quality of life for older people. Through the initiative, Brown will work with the Rhode Island Department of Health and community health providers to develop, test, and disseminate successful interventions.
Jan 8, 2013 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Psychological common ground could ease tensions among those with different religious beliefs
Understanding how thoughts of mortality influence individuals' beliefs sheds light on the commonalities among different groups' motivations and could help ease tensions between opposing viewpoints, according to University of Missouri experiments that tested the relationship between awareness of death and belief in a higher power. The study found that thoughts of death increased atheists, Christians, Muslims and agnostics conviction in their own world views. For example, contrary to the wartime aphorism that there are no atheists in foxholes, thoughts of death did not cause atheists to express belief in a deity.
Jan 7, 2013 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Father's death affects early adolescents' futures in developing world
A father's death can have long-term effects on a child's later success in life and can be particularly harmful if the father passes away during a child's late childhood or early adolescence, according to new research by a University of Missouri anthropologist. Recognizing the impact that a father's death can have on adolescents could lead to improved counseling and assistance programs, especially for needy families in the developing world.
Dec 17, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Significant relationship between mortality and telomere length discovered
A team of researchers at Kaiser Permanente and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) has identified a significant relationship between mortality and the length of telomeres, the stretches of DNA that protect the ends of chromosomes, according to a presentation on Nov. 8 at the American Society of Human Genetics 2012 meeting in San Francisco.
Nov 8, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Discovery may help nerve regeneration in spinal injury
Scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Glasgow have uncovered a possible new method of enhancing nerve repair in the treatment of spinal cord injuries.
Nov 6, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Influenza vaccine may reduce risk of heart disease and death
Getting a flu shot may not only protect you from getting sick, it might also prevent heart disease.
Oct 28, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
'NHS should replace traditional autopsies with non-invasive alternative'
The NHS should implement a non-invasive alternative to autopsies, according to a Department of Health-commissioned report by leading UK experts within the field of post-mortem cross-sectional imaging.
Oct 26, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Gene linked to inflammation in the aorta may contribute to abdominal aortic aneurysm
A gene known to be involved in cancer and cardiovascular development may be the cause of inflammation in the most common form of aortic aneurysm and may be a key to treatment, according to research from Nationwide Children's Hospital. The study, appearing online in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology on October 18, 2012, is the first to show that Notch 1 signaling is activated in abdominal aortic aneurysmal tissue in mice and humans.
Oct 24, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Nursing workloads multiply likelihood of death among black patients over white patients
Older black patients are three times more likely than older white patients to suffer poorer outcomes after surgery, including death, when cared for by nurses with higher workloads, reports research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. The large-scale study showed higher nurse workloads negatively affected older surgical patients generally and that the rate was more significant in older black individuals. When the patient-to-nurse ratio increased above 5:1, the odds of patient death increased by 3 percent per additional patient among whites and by 10 percent per additional patient among blacks.
Oct 16, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Report reveals key concerns of UK's aging society
One in six people in England aged over 50 are socially isolated. They have few socially orientated hobbies, little civic or cultural engagement with society, and may have very limited social networks. This was a key finding from the most recent report of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a comprehensive study that aims to understand the economic, social, psychological and health concerns of an ageing society. The multidisciplinary ELSA research team showed that the least wealthy over-fifties suffer the most social isolation, with the wealthier over 50's half as likely to become socially isolated compared to the least wealthy.
Oct 14, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Argentina heart attack death rate nearly halved over 15 years
The 38th Argentine Congress of Cardiology takes place 5 to 7 October 2012 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The event is organised by the Argentine Society of Cardiology, which is an affiliated member of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)(2). The ESC will present a full day of scientific sessions at the event, on Saturday 6 October, as part of its Global Scientific Activities (GSA) programme. ESC Past-President Michel Komajda will head the European delegation.
Oct 4, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New intervention may help identify and improve care for adolescents at risk for suicide
Investigators at Nationwide Children's Hospital and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center are hoping to better identify adolescents at risk for suicide and improve how these at-risk children receive follow up mental health treatment. Thanks to a $1.2 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the two hospitals will conduct a three-year study to test a new intervention targeting adolescents during emergency department visits.
Oct 3, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
GW researcher receives grant to study treatment and cause of cardiovascular disease in HIV patients
In 1980, men and women who were diagnosed with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) had little to no hope of living long, full lives. Thanks to advances in science and medicine, this is no longer the case. HIV patients now live a near-normal lifespan. However, as patients live longer, new medical issues arise. Michael I. Bukrinsky, M.D., Ph.D., professor of microbiology, immunology, and tropical medicine and professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, saw that cardiovascular disease was becoming a major clinical problem in HIV patients. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute awarded him a grant to study the issue further. His research on this topic is in its third year, and in August, he received a supplement of $156,292 to continue his efforts to find a way to help HIV patients better understand treatments for health issues that may arise as they age.
Oct 1, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
NCH CIRP awarded CDC Injury Control Research Center designation, another 5 years
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has renewed the designation of the Center for Injury Research and Policy (CIRP) of The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital as one of the agency's Injury Control Research Centers (ICRCs). This renewal follows a highly competitive review process of applications by research centers from across the country. It reaffirms CIRP's role as a national leader in the areas of pediatric injury research, education and training, and community outreach.
Aug 13, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New stroke treatments becoming a reality
Scientists led by the President of The University of Manchester have demonstrated a drug which can dramatically limit the amount of brain damage in stroke patients.
Jul 26, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Harvard's Wyss Institute to develop smart suit that improves soldiers' physical endurance
The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University today announced that it has received a $2.6 million contract (including option) from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop a smart suit that helps improve physical endurance for soldiers in the field. The novel wearable system would potentially delay the onset of fatigue, enabling soldiers to walk longer distances, and also potentially improve the body's resistance to injuries when carrying heavy loads.
Jul 19, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Common diabetes drugs associated with increased risk of death
Compared to another popular drug, three widely used diabetes medications are associated with a greater risk of death, a large new analysis finds. The results will be presented Sunday at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.
Jun 24, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Fewer suicides after antidepressive treatment for schizophrenia
Antidepressive drugs reduce the mortality rate of schizophrenic patients, while treatment with bensodiazepines greatly increases it, especially as regards suicide. Giving several antipsychotics simultaneously, however, seems to have no effect at all. This according to a new study examining different drug combinations administered to patients with schizophrenia.
May 8, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Deadly decision: Obese drivers are far less likely to buckle up
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Obese drivers are far less likely to wear seatbelts than are drivers of normal weight, a new University at Buffalo study has found, a behavior that puts them at greater risk of severe injury or death during motor vehicle crashes.
Apr 27, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Death anxiety increases atheists' unconscious belief in God
New research suggests that when non-religious people think about their own death they become more consciously skeptical about religion, but unconsciously grow more receptive to religious belief.
Apr 1, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
University of Maryland completes most extensive full face transplant to date
Baltimore, MD -- The University of Maryland released details today of the most extensive full face transplant completed to date, including both jaws, teeth, and tongue. The 36-hour operation occurred on March 19-20, 2012 at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center and involved a multi-disciplinary team of faculty physicians from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a team of over 150 nurses and professional staff.
Mar 27, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
University of Minnesota and start-up to develop antidote to cyanide poisoning
Cyanide poisoning is often fatal and typically affects victims of industrial accidents, terrorist attacks, or structural fires. Based on research conducted at the Center for Drug Design at the University of Minnesota, startup Vytacera Pharma Inc. will develop and market Sulfanegen, a treatment for cyanide poisoning. Sulfanegen could be administered by first responders in the case of a mass casualty emergency, or to victims of smoke inhalation from a house fire.
Feb 9, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New procedure bests standard of care for fixing damaged cartilage
A new study has demonstrated that a procedure wherein healthy cartilage is transplanted to fix an area of damaged cartilage (osteoarticular cartilage transplantation or OATS procedure) is superior to the standard of care for repairing cartilage defects. It is thought that fixing such lesions may ultimately help to prevent the onset of osteoarthritis, and get athletic individuals back to sporting activities reliably. The study by Hospital for Special Surgery researchers was reported at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Feb. 7-11.
Feb 8, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Group schema therapy for borderline personality disorder
Therapists, patients and families dealing with Borderline Personality Disorder now have an unprecedented guide to a way out of the misery and chaos in the form of the soon to be release book Group Schema Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: Treatment Manual and Patient Workbook. In a series of recent studies ( Giesen-Bloo et al., 2006; Nadort et al., 2009; Farrell, Shaw and Webber, 2009), Schema Therapy (both individual and group forms) has been shown to lead to full recovery across the complete range of symptoms for many patients suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder. Through these studies, Schema Therapy was shown to be more than twice as effective in bringing about full recovery as a widely-practiced traditional treatment (Transference Focused Psychotherapy). Schema Therapy was also found to be more cost-effective and to have a much lower dropout rate. When Group Schema Therapy was added to individual psychotherapy, it was found to lead to even stronger outcomes over a briefer period with a 0% drop out rate and a recovery rate of 94% over a span of 8 months. These promising results have lead to the initiation of a large multi-site international study involving 14 treatment sites spanning 6 countries. Preliminary data from this investigation suggest similarly strong outcomes.
Feb 6, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Workplace safety program can reduce injuries if aggressively enforced, study finds
A longstanding California occupational safety program requiring all businesses to eliminate workplace hazards can help prevent injuries to workers, but only if it is adequately enforced, according to a new study by the RAND Corporation.
Jan 27, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
NIH launches trials to evaluate CPR and drugs after sudden cardiac arrest
The National Institutes of Health has launched two multi-site clinical trials to evaluate treatments for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. One will compare continuous chest compressions (CCC) combined with pause- free rescue breathing to standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which includes a combination of chest compressions and pauses for rescue breathing. The other trial will compare treatment with the drug amiodarone, another drug called lidocaine, or neither medication (a salt-water placebo) in participants with shock-resistant ventricular fibrillation, a condition in which the heart beats chaotically instead of pumping blood.
Jan 26, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New forms of torture leave 'invisible scars,' say researchers
Use of torture around the world has not diminished but the techniques used have grown more complex and sophisticated, according to new research from Queen Mary, University of London.
Jan 3, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Having epilepsy is not linked to committing violent crime
Despite current public and expert opinion to the contrary, having the neurological condition epilepsy is not directly associated with an increased risk of committing violent crime. However, there is an increased risk of individuals who have experienced previous traumatic brain injury going on to commit violent crime according to a large Swedish study led by Seena Fazel from the University of Oxford, UK, and colleagues at the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, and Swedish Prison and Probation Service, and published in this week's PLoS Medicine.
Dec 27, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Scientists identify cell death pathway involved in lethal sepsis
Sepsis, a form of systemic inflammation, is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. Sepsis is linked with massive cell death; however, the specific mechanisms involved in the lethality of sepsis are unclear. Now, a new study published by Cell Press in the December 23rd issue of the journal Immunity finds that inhibition of a specific cell death pathway called necroptosis protected mice from lethal inflammation. The research may lead to new therapeutic interventions for fatal inflammatory conditions that are notoriously hard to control.
Dec 22, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New predictor of heart attack or stroke
CHICAGO --- A hike in your blood pressure during middle age significantly raises the risk of having a heart attack or a stroke during your lifetime, according to new Northwestern Medicine research. The study offers a new understanding on the importance of maintaining low blood pressure early in middle age to prevent heart disease later in life.
Dec 19, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

<< prev next >>

 
Headlines
Health  
Gathering information about food is not top priority for individuals with high metabolisms
NIH renews funding for University of Maryland vaccine research
DHA-enriched formula in infancy linked to positive cognitive outcomes in childhood
New IOM report lays out plan to determine effectiveness of obesity prevention efforts
Vitamin D supplementation may delay precocious puberty in girls
Study: Pedometer program helps motivate participants to sit less, move more
Fish oil may stall effects of junk food on brain
Intake of low energy dense food better than skipping meals
Inaugural IOF Olof Johnell Science Award presented to Professor Harry Genant
Molecular hub links obesity, heart disease to high blood pressure
Healthcare  
Flu pandemic infected one in five
Stigma preventing leprosy-cured from getting jobs
Measles, Mumps make a comeback in US
Melinda Gates calls on Akhilesh Yadav
'Movies, TV impact tobacco users more than newspapers'
Rockland to open three new hospitals in NCR
Spice Global enters healthcare business with hospital in Delhi
Delhi to expedite recruitment of doctors
India adds spice to US life, keeps it healthy
BRICS to strengthen cooperation in health sector
Latest Research  
Bone loss associated with increased production of ROS
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
Crystal methamphetamine use by street youth increases risk of injecting drugs
Johns Hopkins-led study shows increased life expectancy among family caregivers
Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease, say experts
Licensing deal marks coming of age for University of Washington, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Physician job satisfaction driven by quality of patient care
Book explores undiscovered economics of everyday life
Gene and stem cell therapy combination could aid wound healing
Medical News  
NHRC issues notice to Kerala over infant deaths
Advanced breast cancer detecting machine comes to India
'Dispel myths about vitiligo'
NHRC summons Odisha chief secretary
Woman dies of swine flu in UP
Maharashtra, GE to modernise rural health care
Hypertension: India's silent killer
Need cautious effort to eradicate polio: Experts
Ayurveda experts develop online personalised health regimen
Soon a detailed study on 'diabesity': Doctors
Special Topics  
MPs express anguish at Delhi gang-rape, Shinde assures fast trial
Worrying rise in number of medical students in prostitution over last 10 years
Behold India's unfolding democratic revolution
Chinese woman cuts open her belly to save surgery cost
Improved Sense of Smell Produced Smarter Mammals
Two-year-old world's first to have extra DNA strand
172,155 kidney stones removed from one patient!
'Primodial Soup' theory for origin of life rejected in paper
Human species could have killed Neanderthal man
History, geography also seem to shape our genome

All rights reserved by RxPG
Contact Us