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Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
  Last Updated: Nov 2, 2013 - 11:52:55 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Surgically treating GERD helps preserve lung function before and after transplantation
According to a new study from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, correction of gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, by surgery can preserve lung function in patients with end-stage pulmonary disease both before and after transplantation.
Sep 19, 2011 - 5:34:04 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Asthma
Breast-feeding babies staves off asthma risk
Breast-feeding a baby for six months post birth can stave off their risk of developing asthma-related symptoms in early childhood, says a scientific study.
Jul 25, 2011 - 6:36:33 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Asthma
Mannose receptor plays a key role in allergic responses to cat dander
The team of immunologists led by Drs Ghaem-Maghami and Martinez-Pomares in the University's School of Molecular Medical Sciences, and funded by the charity Asthma UK, have identified a cell component which plays a key role in triggering allergic responses to cat dander.

Mar 10, 2011 - 6:16:04 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : COPD
New genetic variants for COPD discovered in a groundbreaking study by SpiroMeta Consortium
Scientists have discovered five genetic variants that are associated with the health of the human lung. The research by an international consortium of 96 scientists from 63 centres in Europe and Australia sheds new light on the molecular basis of lung diseases.
Dec 15, 2009 - 4:59:36 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Horse barn workers at high risk of respiratory symptoms
The estimated 4.6 million Americans involved in the equine industry may be at risk of developing respiratory symptoms due to poor air quality in horse barns, according to a questionnaire study undertaken earlier this year by investigators at Tufts University’s Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.
Nov 22, 2009 - 9:29:00 AM

Latest Research : Biotechnology : Nanotechnology
Carbon nanotubes can affect lung lining
Carbon nanotubes which are used in everything from sports equipment to medical applications can affect the lining of the lungs, say researchers.
Nov 3, 2009 - 11:06:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Pirfenidone could be new agent for treatment of Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
In a Phase III clinical study program called "CAPACITY," investigators discovered that the oral anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory agent, pirfenidone, could slow the deterioration of lung capacity in patients suffering from Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.
May 17, 2009 - 10:59:07 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Asthma
MEMS sensor for remote monitoring of asthmatic patients
An inexpensive web-enabled device for measuring lung function in patients with asthma and other disorders is being developed by researchers at Texas Instruments, in Bangalore, India, and co-workers.
Aug 24, 2008 - 10:26:24 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Obese children have respiratory problems during surgery
A new study from the University of Michigan Health System finds that obese children are much more likely than normal-weight children to have problems with airway obstruction and other breathing-related functions during surgery.
Feb 22, 2008 - 7:39:25 AM

Latest Research
New York Methodist Hospital to study airway bypass treatment for emphysema
Brooklyn, NY, February 4, 2007 -- New York Methodist Hospital today announced the start of the EASE (Exhale Airway Stents for Emphysema) Trial, an international, multi-center clinical trial to explore an investigational treatment that may offer a significant new, minimally-invasive option for those suffering with advanced widespread emphysema. The study focuses on a procedure called airway bypass that involves creating pathways in the lung for trapped air to escape and in turn, relieve emphysema symptoms including shortness of breath.

Feb 6, 2008 - 12:05:00 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Short sleep times in patients with chronic medical diagnoses associated with obesity
A study published in the December 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM) demonstrates an association between short sleep times and obesity in patients with chronic medical problems.
Dec 16, 2007 - 10:09:26 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Strong link between air pollution and acute bronchitis diagnoses in preschool-aged children
In one of the first studies to examine air pollution in relation to infant and early childhood health, a UC Davis researcher has discovered a strong link between exposure to components of air pollution and acute bronchitis diagnoses in preschool-aged children. Those components – polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs – contribute to air pollution from a variety of sources, including coal burning, vehicle exhaust, wood-burning stoves, tobacco smoke and grilling food
Oct 11, 2007 - 3:06:05 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : COPD
Mediterranean diet halves risk of progressive lung disease
A Mediterranean diet halves the chances of developing progressive inflammatory lung disease (COPD), reveals a large study, published ahead of print in Thorax.
May 14, 2007 - 8:09:19 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Newborns with respiratory distress should be evaluated for primary ciliary dyskinesia
Newborns with respiratory distress should be evaluated for primary ciliary dyskinesia, a rare genetic disease that has features similar to cystic fibrosis, says Thomas Ferkol, M.D., from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He reports finding that about 80 percent of patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) have a history of newborn respiratory distress.
Feb 21, 2007 - 6:05:47 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Slow-release morphine helps in chronic treatment resistant cough
Slow-release morphine helped a group of patients with long-term, treatment-resistant chronic cough reduce their daily cough score levels by 40 percent.The research results appear in the second issue for February 2007 of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, published by the American Thoracic Society.
Feb 15, 2007 - 1:50:19 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Asthma
Inhaled treatments work better for asthmatic kids
New York, Jan 24 - Inhaled treatments work better for children suffering from asthma compared to other methods of treatment, say scientists after comparing the effectiveness and safety of different medicines.
Jan 24, 2007 - 10:53:36 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Dogs may help prevent kids from wheezing
Washington, Dec 6 - Exposure to multiple dogs along with presence of a certain types of bacteria could help prevent kids from wheezing, says a new study.
Dec 6, 2006 - 6:41:37 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Acute lung injury is prevented by FoxM1 protein
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have identified a molecule that plays a critical role in the recovery of lung tissue following severe injury.
Sep 15, 2006 - 5:56:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Six-minute walk test predicts mortality rates in patients with pulmonary fibrosis
For idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients awaiting lung transplantation, a simple walk test can predict mortality rates. A new study found that individuals with IPF who can cover less than 680 feet during the six-minute test are four times more likely to die than those who can walk greater distances.
Sep 15, 2006 - 5:46:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Asthma
A dog in home may worsen asthma in children
A new study from researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) suggests that having a dog in the home may worsen the response to air pollution of a child with asthma. The study was published this week in the online edition of Environmental Health Perspectives, the journal of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.
Aug 29, 2006 - 9:08:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Cystic Fibrosis
Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is due to functional abnormalities in beta cells
A growing number of cystic fibrosis patients are battling a second, often deadly complication: a unique form of diabetes that shares characteristics of the type 1 and type 2 versions that strike many Americans. Many of these patients are teens who take enzymes to help digest their food and undergo daily physical therapy to loosen the thick, sticky mucus that clogs their lungs. But despite treatments that are helping thousands to live decades longer than ever before, when diabetes strikes, their life expectancy plummets -- on average by two years for men and an astounding 16 for women.
Jul 10, 2006 - 6:21:00 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : COPD
COPD patients using beta-agonist inhalers are at risk
A new analysis that compares two common inhalers for patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) finds that one reduces respiratory-related hospitalizations and respiratory deaths, but the other -- which is prescribed in the majority of cases -- increases respiratory deaths.
Jul 10, 2006 - 6:15:00 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Beta-agonists linked with increased number of respiratory deaths -study shows
A new analysis that compares two common inhalers for patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) finds that one reduces respiratory-related hospitalizations and respiratory deaths, but the other -- which is prescribed in the majority of cases -- increases respiratory deaths.
Jul 8, 2006 - 8:36:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : COPD
Beta-agonists more than double death rate in COPD patients
A new analysis that compares two common inhalers for patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) finds that one reduces respiratory-related hospitalizations and respiratory deaths, but the other -- which is prescribed in the majority of cases -- increases respiratory deaths.
Jul 5, 2006 - 3:18:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Cystic Fibrosis
No evidence for inhaled corticosteroids efficacy in cystic fibrosis
In comparison to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients who regularly use inhaled corticosteroid, those who did not use these drugs for six months exhibited no positive or negative effects in terms of major disease factors. Such factors include amount of lung function decline, number of antibiotics prescribed, time to onset of acute chest exacerbation or frequency of using a bronchodilator.
Jun 15, 2006 - 4:57:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : COPD
Lung function test underused in patients with COPD
At least two thirds of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) do not receive lung function testing that is recommended for the accurate diagnosis and effective management of the disease, suggesting that the majority of patients are diagnosed with COPD based on symptoms alone. New research published in the June issue of CHEST, the peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), finds that only one third of patients recently diagnosed with COPD underwent spirometry, a noninvasive lung function test, to confirm COPD or to manage their condition. Current national guidelines recommend spirometry for the diagnosis and management of COPD.
Jun 14, 2006 - 8:14:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : COPD
Wrinkles clue to risk of progressive lung disease (COPD)
Middle aged smokers, who are heavily lined with wrinkles, are five times as likely to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD for short, suggests research published ahead of print in Thorax.
Jun 14, 2006 - 8:05:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : COPD
Antibiotics reduce risk of dying from COPD attack by 77 percent
People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease often experience short term worsening and aggravation of their symptoms. To date, there has been conflicting evidence as to whether these exacerbations should be treated with antibiotic therapy. A new systematic review to be published in The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2006 now concludes that they should be used. The researchers found that antibiotics reduce the risk of dying from the attack by 77%, decreases the risk of treatment failure by 53% and decrease the risk of developing pussy sputum by 44%. There is, however, a small increase in the risk of developing diarrhoea. Many people question whether antibiotics should be used to combat exacerbations of COPD. The uncertainty stems from the growing desire to use antibiotics only when necessary, combined with the recognition that up to one third of exacerbations of COPD have are not caused by infections, and some others are due to viral infections.
Jun 12, 2006 - 8:21:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : COPD
Women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) fare worse than men
Women with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) fare worse than men both in terms of the severity of their disease and their quality of life. These differences may play a role in the increased death rate seen among female patients with COPD, said researcher Claudia Cote, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of South Florida in Tampa. The researchers studied 85 women, and compared them with 95 men who had the same levels of COPD severity according to guidelines of the Global Initiative for Chronic Lung Disease (GOLD). They found that female patients were significantly younger than male patients with the same severity of disease. The women had lower lung function, more trouble breathing, and reported a worse quality of life. The women also received a worse score on the BODE index, which looks at lung function, nutritional status, symptoms and exercise capacity in order to measure a COPD patient's disease severity and predicted survival.
Jun 12, 2006 - 8:02:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Cystic Fibrosis
Hcp1 plays a critical role in cystic fibrosis infection
Harvard Medical School researchers have discovered one way that a hardy disease-causing bacteria could be surviving in the lungs of chronically infected cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This work is important because pathogenic bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) use protein secretion systems to cause disease in their hosts. In the case of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the host may be a cancer patient with a weakened immune system, a burn patient, or a person with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), a pathogen that infects more than 80 percent of cystic fibrosis patients, is a leading cause of these patients' death. PA is difficult to treat because it is resistant to many drugs.
Jun 10, 2006 - 1:43:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Infants exposed to cigarette smoke are more likely to develop allergic rhinitis
University of Cincinnati (UC) epidemiologists say it’s environmental tobacco smoke—not the suspected visible mold—that drastically increases an infant’s risk for developing allergic rhinitis by age 1.
May 18, 2006 - 3:16:00 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Asthma
PEAK Trial: Inhaled steroids do not prevent chronic asthma
Daily treatment with inhaled corticosteroids can reduce breathing problems in pre-school-aged children at high risk for asthma but they do not prevent the development of persistent asthma in these children, according to new results from the Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health.
May 11, 2006 - 5:36:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : COPD
Breathing Heliox 28 significantly improve the exercise performance in COPD
Breathing a special gas mixture may significantly improve the exercise performance of individuals with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). During an endurance walking test, the patients found that they could improve their walking distance by 64 percent with less shortness of breath.
Apr 15, 2006 - 6:48:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Asthma
Telithromycin antibiotic could help in asthma attack
A relatively new kind of antibiotic has been found to provide faster relief from an asthma attack, but more research is necessary before the drug can be prescribed, says a study.
Apr 15, 2006 - 6:08:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : COPD
Combined treatment cuts inflammatory cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
The combination of two existing clinical treatments, salmeterol and fluticasone propionate, can significantly reduce inflammatory cells in the airways of current and former smokers being treated for moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
Apr 3, 2006 - 6:48:00 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Study finds in utero arsenic exposure tied to lung disease
Children who are exposed to high levels of arsenic in their drinking water are seven to 12 times more likely to die of lung cancer and other lung diseases in young adulthood, a new study by University of California, Berkeley, and Chilean researchers suggests.
Mar 28, 2006 - 9:04:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Cystic Fibrosis
Cystic fibrosis research could benefit from multi-functional sensing tool
Researchers are using an innovative, multi-functional sensing tool to investigate adenosine triposphate (ATP) release and its role in cystic fibrosis. The ATP study marks the first application of a novel sensing system developed by a research team led by Christine Kranz at the Georgia Institute of Technology.
Mar 27, 2006 - 4:17:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Cystic Fibrosis
Loss of CFTR-mediated fluid secretion is the culprit in cystic fibrosis
Scientists at Stanford University have determined that the buildup of sticky mucus found in cystic fibrosis is caused by a loss in the epithelial cell's ability to secrete fluid. This research appears as the "Paper of the Week" in the March 17 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, an American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology journal.
Mar 19, 2006 - 8:56:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Asthma
Tomatoes, carrots can cut asthma risk
Eating plenty of tomatoes, carrots and leafy green vegetable could help in reducing asthma risk in women, says a study.
Mar 19, 2006 - 8:14:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : COPD
COPD is slated to become world's biggest killer by 2020 - WHO
A smoking-related illness that narrows one's breathing passage is slated to become the world's third biggest killer by 2020, according to the WHO. Called Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), the ailment entails two specific health problems: chronic-obstructive bronchitis and emphysema of the lungs.
Mar 13, 2006 - 8:31:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Asthma
Inhaled steroid may work better for normal-weight people
As the nation's collective waistline has swelled in recent decades, rates of asthma diagnoses also have accelerated. Indeed, much research has affirmed a link between the two conditions. But doctors also recognize that asthma may not behave the same way among people who have different body types. With a variety of asthma medications on the market, what kinds work best for lean people and what kinds work best for obese people? The answer may be different for each group. A new study suggests that people who are overweight or obese may have better results with the prescription pill sold as Singulair than with a type of inhaled steroid, while leaner people may have better luck with an inhaled steroid, called beclomethasone and sold as beclovent, vanceril and other brand names. The findings appear in the new issue of the European Respiratory Journal.
Feb 23, 2006 - 12:18:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Asthma
Female foetus could increase expectant woman's asthma
Asthmatic women pregnant with girls are more likely to experience severe asthma symptoms than those carrying a male foetus, says a study.
Feb 3, 2006 - 3:38:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
New Model To Help Physicians Identify Patients With Pulmonary Embolism
Looking at 10 easily obtained risk factors, including age, blood pressure and medical history, could help physicians identify patients with pulmonary embolism who are at low risk of death in the short term and therefore are candidates for outpatient treatment, according to a new study in the January 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
Jan 25, 2006 - 12:27:00 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
CAPRIE study: Moxifloxacin more effective in elders pneumonia
A newer antibiotic medication proved more effective at knocking out community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in patients 65 and older than the antibiotic that has been the front-line CAP treatment the last decade, according to a national study coordinated at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.
Jan 24, 2006 - 11:52:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Using microDMx sensor to develop better instruments to treat lung disease
A new technique based on the same technology used to detect chemical warfare agents and explosives is being employed by scientists at The University of Manchester to treat hospital patients with lung disease.
Jan 24, 2006 - 3:57:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Cystic Fibrosis
New treatment for cystic fibrosis patients
Scientists have discovered a new therapy for lung problems associated with cystic fibrosis that they say may reduce the use of antibiotics.
Jan 19, 2006 - 1:10:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Osteopontin may be useful in the treatment of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
In an article in the Jan. 15 issue of the American Journal of Respiratory Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh researchers report that a serious, life-threatening form of pulmonary fibrosis, called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, lacks all the hallmarks of inflammation and is probably unnecessarily treated with anti-inflammatory drugs.
Jan 12, 2006 - 5:41:00 AM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine
Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia (IIP) Linked to Linked to Genes and Smoking
New research shows that idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), a group of potentially fatal disorders that affects the lungs, may be caused by an interaction between a specific genetic background and cigarette smoking. In a study of 111 families that had at least two relatives with IIP, people who smoked cigarettes were three times more likely than non-smokers to develop the disease. The research was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), both institutes within the National Institutes of Health.
Nov 2, 2005 - 1:03:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Asthma
Childhood Asthma Affecting More than Just Breathing
Recent research has shown that kids with asthma may also be at risk for psychological problems such as depression, anxiety, and problems in their social lives including peer interactions. This study, recently published in the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, is one of the first to examine relationships among asthma, anxiety and depression, and several aspects of social functioning in urban children.
Oct 26, 2005 - 11:57:00 PM

Latest Research : Medicine : Respiratory Medicine : Cystic Fibrosis
Genetic variations influence cystic fibrosis' severity
Subtle differences in other genes -- besides the defective gene known to cause the illness cystic fibrosis -- can significantly modify the inherited disease's severity, a large new multi-center national study has concluded. The study, led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Case Western Reserve University researchers, for the first time shows that particular versions of the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFb1) gene are largely responsible for how badly the illness affects patients' lungs.
Oct 8, 2005 - 5:24:00 AM

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