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Latest Research : Musculoskeletal
  Last Updated: Nov 2, 2013 - 11:52:55 AM

Latest Research
Forum tackles the rising costs, challenges and diminished outcomes associated with treating obese patients for orthopaedic conditions
The obesity epidemic in America and its impact on musculoskeletal health, as well as related treatment outcomes and costs, was discussed during the AAOS Now forum, Obesity, Orthopaedics and Outcomes, at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) at McCormick Place in Chicago.
Apr 10, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
ACL reconstruction technique improves outcomes in pediatric patients
A new study demonstrates the superiority of a specific technique to perform anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in children. In recent years, the number of ACL surgeries in pediatric athletes has skyrocketed.
Jul 13, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Japanese researchers show that acupuncture can improve skeletal muscle atrophy
A team of Japanese researchers will reveal study results Monday at the Experimental Biology 2012 meeting that show how acupuncture therapy mitigates skeletal muscle loss and holds promise for those seeking improved mobility through muscle rejuvenation.
Apr 23, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New potential target for rheumatoid arthritis
Newcastle University scientists, in work funded by Arthritis Research UK, have discovered a new way of potentially treating rheumatoid arthritis. This works by preventing damaging white blood cells cells from entering the joints.
Mar 5, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Vitamin D deficiency high among trauma patients
New research presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found that 77 percent of trauma patients had deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D.
Feb 7, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Foot and ankle structure differs between sprinters and non-sprinters
The skeletal structure of the foot and ankle differs significantly between human sprinters and non-sprinters, according to Penn State researchers. Their findings not only help explain why some people are faster runners than others, but also may be useful in helping people who have difficulty walking, such as older adults and children with cerebral palsy.
Jan 24, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Better CMT outcome measurement is Wayne State University physician's goal
A Wayne State University physician is seeking a better way to determine the effectiveness of treatments for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), or inherited sensory-motor neuropathy, a disease that afflicts one in 2,500 people.
Dec 7, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Back pain? Move, don't rest!
Move if you have back pain, this is the advice of a researcher at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg. Patients with acute low back pain who were advised to stay active despite the pain fared better than those who were told to adjust their activity in line with their pain.
Sep 19, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Physiotherapy
Physiotherapy after surgery best for shoulder problems
Most patients who receive physiotherapy after surgery experience that pain is reduced by a half within a few months. Most of them are free of pain after one to two years. This is the conclusion of a thesis presented at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Jun 21, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
ACSM: Yoga helped older stroke victims improve balance, endurance
An Indiana University study that exposed older veterans with stroke to yoga produced exciting results as researchers explore whether this popular mind-body practice can help stroke victims cope with their increased risk for painful and even deadly falls.
Jun 4, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Common hip disorder can cause sports hernia
Sports hernias are commonly found in individuals with a mechanical disorder of the hip and can be resolved with surgery to fix the hip disorder alone in some cases, according to a recent study. The research, conducted by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery, will be presented at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine 2011 Specialty Day meeting, held Feb. 19 in San Diego following the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.
Feb 19, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Large study of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair reveals some surprises
Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair is highly effective and provides durable results five years after surgery, according to a large, prospective study by Hospital for Special Surgery investigators. The study also surprisingly revealed that the rotator cuff has the ability to heal even when early imaging studies have found a defect at the site of repair. The research will be presented at the upcoming American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) 2011 Specialty Day meeting, to be held Feb. 19 in San Diego, Calif., following the annual meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.
Feb 19, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Musculoskeletal : Muscular Dystrophies
Duchenne muscular dystrophy - also a disease of stem cells
Researchers have long known that the devastating disease called Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a single mutation in a gene called dystrophin. The protein encoded by that gene is critical for the integrity of muscle; without it, they are easily damaged. But new findings in mice reported online in the journal Cell on December 9th by researchers at Stanford suggest that disease symptoms, including progressive muscle weakening leading to respiratory failure, only set in when skeletal muscle stem cells can no longer keep up with the needed repairs.

Dec 10, 2010 - 8:26:15 AM

Latest Research
Laboratory studies show promise for new multiple sclerosis treatment
Successfully treating and reversing the effects of multiple sclerosis, or MS, may one day be possible using a drug originally developed to treat chronic pain, according to Distinguished Professor Linda Watkins of the University of Colorado at Boulder.
Nov 18, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
NIH awards Muscular Dystrophy Cooperative Research Center grants
Three grants totaling more than $4.5 million, from agencies of the National Institutes of Health, will be used to explore novel treatment strategies for muscular dystrophy.
Sep 29, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Simple, accurate in-office tool predicts athletes at high-risk for ACL injury, study details
PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- Previously, determining athletes at high-risk for ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) injuries required expensive and complex laboratory-based motion analysis systems, such as those used in creating video games. But a new study presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting, offers physicians a low-cost, in-office, tool to help identify athletes at increased risk.
Jul 17, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New surgery improves outcomes for severe flat foot deformity
A surgery developed at Hospital for Special Surgery can improve patient outcomes in individuals with severe adult flat foot deformity, a problem that is increasingly being seen inhospitals across the country. Patients who undergo the new surgery have better long-term outcome and mobility than those who undergo traditional surgery. The paper will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS, abstract 348) in National Harbor, Md., on July 8.
Jul 8, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Hip exercises found effective at reducing, eliminating common knee pain in runners
A twice weekly hip strengthening regimen performed for six weeks proved surprisingly effective at reducing -- and in some cases eliminating -- knee pain referred to as patellofemoral pain (PFP) in female runners.
Jun 4, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
NIH awards $7.5 million to study MRI as a tool to evaluate children with muscular dystrophy
Duchenne muscular dystrophy research at the University of Florida got a major boost with the award of $7.5 million in National Institutes of Health funding to study the use of magnetic resonance imaging in determining the natural progression of the disease.
May 7, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Using stem cells to mend damaged hips
Bone stem cells could in future be used instead of bone from donors as part of an innovative new hip replacement treatment, according to scientists at the University of Southampton.
Mar 23, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Osteoporosis drug improves healing after rotator cuff surgery
Tears in the shoulder's rotator cuff, a common sports injury, are painful and restricting. Surgery to repair the damage is successful for pain management, but in many patients it does not result in full recovery of function due to poor healing. New research shows an approved therapy for osteoporosis, Forteo, may speed healing and improve patient outcomes. The preliminary study from Hospital for Special Surgery in New York is being presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) meeting in New Orleans March 9-13.
Mar 10, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Quantity vs. quality: Long-term use of bone-building osteoporosis drugs
Bisphosphonate treatments, proven to enhance bone density and reduce fracture incidence in post-menopausal women, may adversely affect bone quality and increase risk of atypical fractures of the femur when used for four or more years, according to preliminary research presented today at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).
Mar 10, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Electromagnetic pulses provide pain relief for osteoarthritis
Electromagnetic pulses significantly decrease pain and inflammation associated with osteoarthritis of the knee, according to Henry Ford Hospital researchers.
Mar 6, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Multicenter study finds little effect of soy isoflavones on bone loss in postmenopausal women
AMES, Iowa -- A previous six-month study by Iowa State University researchers had indicated that consuming modest amounts of soy protein, rich in isoflavones, lessened lumbar spine bone loss in midlife, perimenopausal women. But now an expanded three-year study by some of those same researchers does not show a bone-sparing effect in postmenopausal women who ingested soy isoflavone tablets, except for a modest effect at the femoral (hip) neck among those who took the highest dosage.
Feb 9, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Extremity war injuries symposium seeks to improve patient care for wounded warriors
WASHINGTON, D.C. - Since the beginning of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom, there have been nearly 36,000 battle- injured warriors, of which approximately 82 percent suffer extremity trauma. Many of these injuries are complicated by the effects of improvised explosive devices which cause injury patterns distinct from civilian trauma. Traditional wound-management guidelines simply fall short. In an effort to address the increasing number and severity of extremity war injuries among the nation's warriors serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), the Society of Military Orthopaedic Surgeons (SOMOS), the Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA), and the Orthopaedic Research Society (ORS) will bring together the nation's top civilian and military orthopaedic trauma surgeons and researchers for a two-day symposium January 27 - 29 to discuss barriers of return of function and duty and develop treatment principles.
Jan 27, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Startup at UCLA tech incubator to begin clinical trials for wireless body-monitoring system
MediSens Wireless, a startup company in UCLA's on-campus technology incubator at the California NanoSystems Institute, has obtained approval under federal Food and Drug Administration guidelines to begin clinical trials on its novel wireless body-monitoring system, which assesses muscle and neuromotor functions in the upper extremities.
Jan 12, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Tarantula venom-based MD therapy to be advanced by UB scientists' biotech company
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- University at Buffalo biophysicists have found a protein in tarantula venom that shows promise as a potential therapy for muscular dystrophy (MD). They have formed a start-up biotech company in Buffalo -- Rose Pharmaceuticals -- to advance the drug to clinical trials.
Dec 29, 2009 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Drug could provide first treatment for scleroderma
Investigators have identified a drug that is currently approved to treat certain types of cancer, Gleevec, that could provide the first treatment for scleroderma, a chronic connective tissue disease for which a treatment has remained elusive. The news will be presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology on October 18 in Philadelphia.
Oct 17, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Advances in treating hip pain to be focus of International Society for Hip Arthroscopy meeting
Recent advances in diagnostic imaging techniques and hip arthroscopy procedures are giving physicians and surgeons better tools with which to treat hip pain. The 2009 International Society for Hip Arthroscopy meeting, hosted by Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, brings together leading surgeons from all over the world to take an in-depth look at hip arthroscopy and its potential benefits.
Sep 26, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Musculoskeletal
Artificial gravity prevents muscle loss in space
When the Apollo 11 crew got back from the moon some 40 years ago, they showed no ill effects from a week spent in weightlessness. But as space men began conducting longer-duration space flights, scientists noticed a disturbing trend: the longer humans stay in zero gravity, the more muscle they lose.
Aug 6, 2009 - 1:31:15 PM

Latest Research
Study to assess hip exercises as treatment for osteoarthritis in the knee joints
Researchers at Rush University Medical Center are testing a novel regimen of hip-muscle exercises to decrease the load on the knee joints in patients with osteoarthritis. The goal is not only to relieve pain but also, possibly, to halt progression of the disease.
Jul 15, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Study to assess hip exercises as treatment for osteoarthritis in the knee joints
Researchers at Rush University Medical Center are testing a novel regimen of hip-muscle exercises to decrease the load on the knee joints in patients with osteoarthritis. The goal is not only to relieve pain but also, possibly, to halt progression of the disease.
Jul 15, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Surgery may not be necessary for Achilles tendon rupture
The two ends of a ruptured Achilles tendon are often stitched together before the leg is put in plaster, in order to reduce the risk of the tendon rupturing again. However, Katarina Nilsson Helander, MD, PhD at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, now suggests that surgery may be unnecessary. Patients who do not undergo surgery have just as good a chance of recovery.
May 14, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Risk of vibration-induced vascular injuries linked to vibration frequency differences
Speaking on April 19 at the Experimental Biology 2009 meeting in New Orleans, Dr. Kristine Krajnak, a team leader in the Engineering and Control Technologies Branch of the Health Effects Laboratory Division of NIOSH in Morgantown, West Virginia, describes results from the first study to directly link the different physical responses of tissue that occur with exposure to different vibration frequencies with biological mechanisms underlying the development of vascular dysfunction. Her presentation is part of the scientific program of The American Physiological Society.
Apr 19, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Biomedical engineering student recognized as IEEE's 'New Face of Engineering'
WASHINGTON (17 March 2009) -- Guruprasad Madhavan is working on neuromuscular stimulation approaches that may help prevent osteoporosis, heart failure and mild cognitive impairment -- all related to low blood pressure.
Mar 17, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Musculoskeletal
A couple of glasses of red wine a day keep disabilities away!
It is well known that moderate drinking can have positive health benefits — for instance, a couple of glasses of red wine a day can be good for the heart. But if you're a senior in good health, light to moderate consumption of alcohol may also help prevent the development of physical disability.
Jan 15, 2009 - 2:47:51 PM

Latest Research : Musculoskeletal : Muscular Dystrophies
Sarcospan may help in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
The overlooked and undervalued protein, sarcospan, just got its moment in the spotlight. Peter et al. now show that adding it to muscle cells might ameliorate the most severe form of muscular dystrophy.
Nov 3, 2008 - 12:01:09 AM

Latest Research
'Wildcat Power Cord' repairs cruciate ligament in dairy cow's knee
MANHATTAN, KAN. -- An 8-year-old Jersey dairy cow is back at her Kansas farm thanks to a decade of research and an experimental surgery performed at Kansas State University's Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital.
Mar 27, 2008 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Lithium chloride slows onset of skeletal muscle disorder
Irvine, Calif., March 18, 2008 -- A new UC Irvine study finds that lithium chloride, a drug used to treat bipolar disorder, can slow the development of inclusion body myositis, a skeletal muscle disease that affects the elderly.
Mar 18, 2008 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Massive microRNA scan uncovers leads to treating muscle degeneration
Researchers have discovered the first microRNAs – tiny bits of code that regulate gene activity – linked to each of 10 major degenerative muscular disorders, opening doors to new treatments and a better biological understanding of these debilitating, poorly understood, often untreatable diseases. The study, to be published online this week by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was led by Iris Eisenberg, PhD, of the Program in Genomics at Children’s Hospital Boston. Louis Kunkel, PhD, director of the Program in Genomics and an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, was senior investigator.
Oct 17, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
FDA approves knee-injury device for humans
COLUMBIA, Mo. – A new knee-surgery device investigated by University of Missouri-Columbia researchers that will help to repair meniscus tears, which were previously defined as irreparable, has been approved by the FDA for use in humans.
Oct 2, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Neurosciences
Brain abnormalities found in people with writer's cramp
People with serious cases of writer�s cramp have brain abnormalities, according to a study published in the July 24, 2007, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. People with writer�s cramp had less brain tissue than healthy people in three areas of the brain that connect the senses and movement with their affected hand.
Jul 23, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Sports hernia repair surgery plus innovative rehab program helps athletes return to play
St. Louis, July 15, 2007 — In recent years, sports hernias have sidelined many high-level athletes for months and, occasionally, prevented a return to competitive sports all together. New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that surgical repair of sports hernias using tension-free mesh, coupled with an innovative rehabilitation program, successfully returned athletes to competition in 93 percent of cases.
Jul 15, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Sports hernia repair technique coupled with innovative rehabilitation program speeds return to play
CALGARY, Alberta -- Surgical repair of athletic hernia using tension-free mesh and a standardized rehabilitation protocol are successful in returning athletes to competition, according to new research released today at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine at the Telus Convention Center (July 12-15).
Jul 15, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Women and arthritis sufferers have poorer short-term recovery from arthroscopic knee surgery
CALGARY, Alberta -- The factors associated with poor short-term recovery from knee surgery appear to be different than those found to mar long-term outcome from the same surgery, according to new research released today at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine at the Telus Convention Center (July 12-15).
Jul 14, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Tennis elbow procedure demonstrates long-term success
CALGARY, Alberta -- Arthroscopic treatment of tennis elbow has shown to be successful at long-term follow-up, according to new research released today at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine at the Telus Convention Center (July 12-15).
Jul 14, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Serica scientists win AOSSM Award for ACL tissue regeneration in preclinical study
MEDFORD, MA and CALGARY, CANADA, JULY13, 2007 -- Serica Technologies, Inc., a growth-stage medical device company developing silk-based biomaterial platforms for tissue regeneration, today announced that its scientists received the Cabaud Memorial Award from the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM), for their pre-clinical research demonstrating the potential of Serica’s SeriACL™ Graft to regenerate or re-grow anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tissue in the knee, in a large-animal model.
Jul 13, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Penn researchers find a new target for muscular dystrophy drug therapy
PHILADELPHIA - Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine report how the gene for utrophin, which codes for a protein very similar to dystrophin, the defective protein in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), puts the brakes on its own expression in muscle cells, thereby suggesting a new target for treatment. The findings were published online in Molecular Biology Cell, in advance of print publication.
Jul 12, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Neoprene sleeve equal to knee brace during recovery from ACL surgery
CALGARY, Alberta -- Users of functional knee braces and neoprene sleeves have similar recoveries from anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, according to new research presented today at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine at the Telus Convention Center (July 12-15).
Jul 12, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Groin injuries averted by preseason injury prevention
CALGARY, Alberta -- Professional soccer players who participated in a special preseason groin injury prevention program had fewer groin injuries during that subsequent season than those who were not in the program, according to new research released today at the 2007 Annual Meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine at the Telus Convention Center (July 12-15).
Jul 12, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

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