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Latest Research : Ophthalmology
  Last Updated: Nov 2, 2013 - 11:52:55 AM

Latest Research
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Research led by physician-scientists at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine has produced a breakthrough discovery in diagnosing retinitis pigmentosa, a blinding disease that affects about 1 in 4,000 people in the United States.
Oct 14, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Breakthrough camera to improve detection of blinding eye disease and diabetes
26 February 2013, Sydney, Australia: The most advanced technology for use in real-time detection and assessment of common blinding eye disease and general health disorders will soon be available to the world with stimulus funding provided for development by the Australian Government's CRC Program. The imaging technology of the breakthrough retinal camera is being developed by the Vision Cooperative Research Centre (Vision CRC) based in Sydney with international partners in Australia, US, China, India and Africa.
Feb 26, 2013 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Mayo Clinic researchers stop neuromyelitis optica attacks with new therapy
ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Mayo Clinic researchers have identified a new therapy for patients with neuromyelitis optica that appears to stop inflammation of the eye nerves and spinal cord. NMO is a debilitating central nervous system disorder that is often misdiagnosed as multiple sclerosis (MS). In the study, patients with severe symptoms of the disease, also known as NMO, were given eculizumab, a drug typically used to treat blood disorders.
Oct 9, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Patent issued for technology that improves eyesight dramatically
A U.S. patent has been issued to the University of Rochester for technology that has boosted the eyesight of tens of thousands of people around the world to unprecedented levels and reduced the need for patients to undergo repeat surgeries.
Oct 3, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Mass. Eye and Ear, Joslin Diabetes announce collaboration in eye care
Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the Joslin Diabetes Center announced today that they have reached agreement to form a clinical and research alliance, aimed toward providing coordinated high quality care to eye patients throughout greater Boston, especially those with or at-risk for diabetes-related eye disease.
Sep 10, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
UCSC physicist Alexander Sher named Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences
SANTA CRUZ, CA--The Pew Charitable Trusts has named Alexander Sher, assistant professor of physics at UC Santa Cruz, a Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences. Sher will receive a $240,000 award over four years to support his research on how the retina heals itself after laser surgery.
Jun 14, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Wayne State University researcher examines protein's role in diabetic retinopathy
DETROIT - A Wayne State University researcher believes a protein that fails to reach the nucleus of retinal cells may play a role in causing eye disease in people with diabetes.
Jun 7, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Bascom Palmer Eye Institute announces breakthrough for degenerative vision disorder
Miami - A research team, led by John Guy, M.D., professor of ophthalmology at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has pioneered a novel technological treatment for Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON), an inherited genetic defect that causes rapid, permanent, and bilateral loss of vision in people of all ages, but primarily males ages 20-40. Genetic mutations in the mitochondria (part of the cell that produces energy) cause the disorder. Currently, there is no cure for LHON. However, Guy and his team have successfully modified a virus and used it to introduce healthy genes into the mitochondria to correct the genetic defect. Using experimental models, they have proven that it is both safe and effective to replace mutated genes with healthy ones and that doing so prevents deterioration of the retinal cells that form the optic nerve. This research demonstrates that when efficiently introduced into mitochondria, normal DNA can correct a biochemical defect in cellular energy production and restore visual function.
Apr 23, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
KalVista and JDRF form research partnership for novel treatment of diabetic eye disease
Southampton, UK and New York, USA 09 January 2012 - KalVista Pharmaceuticals (KalVista) and JDRF have formed a research partnership focused on a novel approach being developed by KalVista to preserve vision and slow the progression of diabetic eye disease. Diabetic eye disease is one of the most common and most serious complications in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). JDRF will provide up to $2.2 million in milestone-based financial support and research expertise to KalVista. The goal of this partnership is to advance KalVista's lead pre-clinical candidate, a plasma kallikrein inhibitor, into human proof-of-concept clinical trials and to generate clinical data that would highlight its potential as an entirely new approach to treat diabetic macular edema (DME). DME is a leading cause of visual loss for people with T1D that involves swelling of the retina, which can lead to blurred vision and blindness.
Jan 9, 2012 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
AMD-like lesions delayed in mice fed lower glycemic index diet
BOSTON (November 14, 2011) -- Feeding older mice a lower glycemic index (GI) diet consisting of slowly-digested carbohydrates delays the onset of age-related, sight-threatening retinal lesions, according to a new study from the Laboratory for Nutrition and Vision Research at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University.
Nov 14, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
High-quality white light produced by four-color laser source
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. -- The human eye is as comfortable with white light generated by diode lasers as with that produced by increasingly popular light-emitting diodes (LEDs), according to tests conceived at Sandia National Laboratories.
Oct 26, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
SUNY receives $4.3 million for research in neuroscience, pediatric pharmacology and vision
The State University of New York has received two grants totaling more than $4.3 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support neuroscience and pediatric pharmacology and vision research as part of SUNY REACH, a collaborative research network of SUNY's four academic health centers and the College of Optometry. The lead researchers on both grants will be headquartered at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York.
Oct 14, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
In iPad, researcher sees hope for children with impaired visual function
LAWRENCE -- A researcher at the University of Kansas believes the iPad could vastly improve the lives and prospects of children living with cortical visual impairment, a severe neurological disorder resulting from brain damage that prevents children from interpreting visual information.
Oct 5, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
NJIT and UMDNJ license personal tonometer technology for innovative glaucoma testing
NJIT and UMDNJ have executed a license agreement with The Incubation Factory, St. Louis, MO, covering their personal tonometer technology on which a patent is pending. The tonometer was developed by a research team led by NJIT Professor Gordon Thomas, PhD, and Robert Fechtner, MD, director of the glaucoma division at UMDNJ. NJIT Associate Professor Tara Alvarez was a member of the research team.
May 17, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Eye movement differs in British and Chinese populations
The team, working with Sichuan University in Chengdu, China, investigated eye movements in Chinese and British people to further understanding of the brain mechanisms that control them and how they compare between different human populations. They found that a type of eye movement, that is rare in British people, is much more common in Chinese people, suggesting that there could be subtle differences in brain function between different populations.
Mar 24, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Rochester technology to enhance eyesight approved by FDA
A technology created by University of Rochester physicians and scientists that has helped boost the eyesight of patients to unprecedented levels is now more widely available, thanks to approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
Mar 16, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Ophthalmology : Retina : ARMD
Deficiency of the Dicer enzyme in retinal cells linked to age-related macular degeneration
A team of researchers, led by University of Kentucky ophthalmologist Dr. Jayakrishna Ambati, has discovered a molecular mechanism implicated in geographic atrophy, the major cause of untreatable blindness in the industrialized world.

Feb 6, 2011 - 4:45:23 PM

Latest Research
ONR's TechSolutions providing SEALs with new glasses that change lens color on the fly
ARLINGTON, Va. - The Office of Naval Research's (ONR) TechSolutions department is set to deliver to Navy Special Warfare Command personnel later this year new protective eyewear that will eliminate the need for warfighters to stop to change out colored lenses to accommodate differences in light levels.
Jan 27, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Case Western Reserve receives $10M to study retinal disease, develop new treatments
The Departments of Pharmacology and Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have been awarded a $10.1 million grant from the National Eye Institute (NEI) to research and develop new treatments for diseases of the retina, a leading cause of blindness.
Dec 28, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Eye movement problems common cause of reading difficulties in stroke patients
Visual problems can affect up to two thirds of stroke patients, but can sometimes go undetected if patients do not recognise them as an after-effect of the condition or if they are unable to communicate the problem to their medical team or families.
Dec 1, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
NIH adds first images to major research database
The National Institutes of Health has expanded a genetic and clinical research database to give researchers access to the first digital study images. The National Eye Institute (NEI), in collaboration with the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), has made available more than 72,000 lens photographs and fundus photographs of the back of the eye, collected from the participants of the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS).
Nov 23, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
University at Buffalo symposium on in silico methods, high throughput screening
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Twenty-first-century pharmaceutical breakthroughs require 21st-century drug discovery tools, such as computational or in silico molecular design and high-throughput screening of effective, new compounds. That's the theme of a University at Buffalo symposium to be held Sept. 11 on Twenty-first Century Bioscience: In Silico Methods and High-Throughput Screening, which will feature a variety of cutting-edge advances in the field developed by researchers in Western New York and throughout the US.
Sep 2, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Gravity-defying illusion wins international contest
A new amazing illusion proves that defying gravity may be as simple as your point of view.
May 18, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Mass. Eye and Ear receives NEI grant renewal for 'growing' clinical/scientists
Boston (May 10, 2010) - The Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School Department of Ophthalmology, has been awarded a grant renewal from the National Institutes of Health, National Eye Institute (NEI), to recruit, train and support first-rate clinician scientists to promote translational and clinical research into cures for eye disease.
May 10, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Strategy to help doctors determine when to treat retinopathy of prematurity
NEW YORK (April 29, 2010) -- Scientists have shown that through eye examinations, doctors can identify infants who are most likely to benefit from early treatment for a potentially blinding eye condition called retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), resulting in better vision for many children.
Apr 29, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Ophthalmology
First sign of injury in glaucoma occurs in the neuronal connections in the brain
In a recent study, David Calkins, Ph.D., director of Research at the VEI, discovered that the first sign of injury in glaucoma actually occurs in the brain.

Mar 1, 2010 - 1:08:56 PM

Latest Research : Ophthalmology : Retina : ARMD
Quit smoking to save your eyes
A UCLA study finds that even after age 80, smoking continues to increase one's risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in Americans over 65.
Jan 1, 2010 - 11:09:08 AM

Latest Research
Researchers discover mechanism that helps humans see in bright and low light
Oct. 13, 2009 -- Ever wonder how your eyes adjust during a blackout? When we go from light to near total darkness, cells in the retina must quickly adjust. Vision scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified an intricate process that allows the human eye to adapt to darkness very quickly. The same process also allows the eye to function in bright light.
Oct 13, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New effort to battle antibiotic resistance rallies researchers throughout Harvard University
Boston. MA--The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have awarded $5 million to an interdisciplinary group of Harvard researchers to launch the Harvard-wide Program on Antibiotic Resistance. Headed by Michael S. Gilmore, Ph.D., (Senior Scientist, Schepens Eye Research Institute and Schepens Professor of Ophthalmology [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics], HMS), the group is uniting Harvard institutions in the fight against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other antibiotic resistant infection. The goal of the project is for the research team with a range of expertise to tackle the problem from different directions, and then to translate those findings into better treatments.
Oct 13, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Major health care challenges persist for D.C. children despite high rates of health insurance coverage, RAND study finds
Despite high rates of health insurance coverage among children in the District of Columbia, children's access to health care is inadequate and poses a significant health problem for the city's young residents, particularly those who are publicly insured, according to a RAND Corporation study issued today.
Oct 8, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Case Western Reserve awarded $1.57M for corneal infection research
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have been awarded a $1.57 million renewal grant from the National Eye Institute (NEI) of the National Institutes of Health to continue their study of corneal infections, specifically, bacterial keratitis, associated with contact lens wear. The grant will extend the work initiated last year with the receipt of a $2.4 million, five-year grant from the NEI.
Oct 7, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
K-State scientist receives grant from National Institutes of Health to research cataracts
Research at Kansas State University is investigating the molecular composition of cataracts in hopes of developing a nonsurgical method to prevent or reverse the eye disease.
Jul 14, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
K-State scientist receives grant from National Institutes of Health to research cataracts
Research at Kansas State University is investigating the molecular composition of cataracts in hopes of developing a nonsurgical method to prevent or reverse the eye disease.
Jul 14, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Queen's University study aims at early diagnosis for ADHD and Parkinson's disease
Eye movement tests developed by Queen's University researchers to aid in understanding childhood brain development and healthy aging may also help in the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and detecting the early onset of Parkinson's disease. The project has received close to $1 million in recent funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).
Jul 13, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Queen's University study aims at early diagnosis for ADHD and Parkinson's disease
Eye movement tests developed by Queen's University researchers to aid in understanding childhood brain development and healthy aging may also help in the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and detecting the early onset of Parkinson's disease. The project has received close to $1 million in recent funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).
Jul 13, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
IU School of Optometry named national vision research center
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- A group of scientists working in Indiana University's School of Optometry and the Department of Biology will share more than $2.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to support their ongoing vision research.
Jun 29, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
K-State professor awarded $1.48 million to study LASIK complictions
Gary Conrad, a university distinguished professor at Kansas State University's Division of Biology, has received a four-year grant renewal of $1.48 million from The National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health to study the cornea.
May 1, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Study reports success in treating a rare retinal disorder
Ann Arbor, MI--Patients with a rare, blinding eye disease saw their vision improve after treatment with drugs to suppress their immune systems, according to researchers at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center. Because autoimmune retinopathy (AIR) is difficult to diagnose, the biggest challenge now is to find biologic markers that identify patients who can benefit from treatment.
Apr 14, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
ORNL, UT project could save vision of millions
OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Feb. 17, 2009 -- In the blink of an eye, people at risk of becoming blind can now be screened for eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration.
Feb 17, 2009 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Vigorous exercise may help prevent vision loss
Berkeley, CA -- There's another reason to dust off those running shoes. Vigorous exercise may help prevent vision loss, according to a pair of studies from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The studies tracked approximately 31,000 runners for more than seven years, and found that running reduced the risk of both cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.
Feb 9, 2009 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
From outer space to the eye clinic: New cataract early detection technique
A compact fiber-optic probe developed for the space program has now proven valuable for patients in the clinic as the first non-invasive early detection device for cataracts, the leading cause of vision loss worldwide.
Jan 12, 2009 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Research 'A' team to fast track Bionic Eye, Australian consortium announced
Tens of thousands of people with severe vision loss are set to benefit after the announcement today of a landmark partnership of world-leading Australian research institutes.
Nov 12, 2008 - 5:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Ophthalmology
Sunlight, low anti-oxidant levels likely to damage vision
London - The combination of low antioxidant levels and exposure to sunlight may damage certain kinds of vision. It is also linked with age-related macular degeneration -.

Nov 3, 2008 - 1:27:53 PM

Latest Research : Ophthalmology : Cataract
Kuwaiti surgeon develops new method to treat cataract
Dubai, Oct 18 - A Kuwaiti eye specialist has invented a process by which cataracts can be treated with a rentiscope without going for the complex option of retina transplant.

Oct 18, 2008 - 5:04:42 PM

Latest Research : Ophthalmology : Retina : ARMD
Post Menopausal Hormones - reduces risk of macular degeneration
Women who take postmenopausal hormones appear to have a lower risk of developing advanced stages of the eye disease age-related macular degeneration, especially if they had also taken oral contraceptives in the past, according to a report in the April issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
Apr 14, 2008 - 1:52:27 PM

Latest Research : Ophthalmology : Retina
New Findings Indicate That Eyes Can Regenerate Damaged Retinas
Washington, March 20 - It might be possible to turn on the eye's own resources to regenerate damaged retinas, without the need for transplanting outside retinal tissue or stem cells, according to a new study.

Mar 20, 2008 - 11:32:50 AM

Latest Research : Ophthalmology
Coffee drinking protects against an eyelid spasm
People who drink coffee are less likely to develop an involuntary eye spasm called primary late onset blepharospasm, which makes them blink uncontrollably and can leave them effectively "blind", according to a study published online ahead of print in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery and Psychiatry.
Jun 21, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Ophthalmology : Retina : ARMD
Higher fish consumption have a reduced risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration
Individuals who have higher dietary intake of foods with omega-3 fatty acids and higher fish consumption have a reduced risk of advanced age-related macular degeneration, while those with higher serum levels of vitamin D may have a reduced risk of the early stages of the disease, according to two reports in the May issue of Archives of Ophthalmology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.
May 14, 2007 - 8:33:58 PM

Latest Research : Ophthalmology
Dry Eye Syndrome affects quality of life
As a clinical diagnosis, Dry Eye Syndrome (DES) may not appear to be a major health issue, but in a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology, researchers found that DES had a significant impact on quality of life.

Mar 10, 2007 - 12:30:16 AM

Latest Research : Ophthalmology
Choroideremia- fault in the retinal pigment epithelium
Choroideremia is an X chromosome-linked hereditary retinal degenerative disease that leads to blindness in an estimated one in every 100,000 people. This study has found that the transportation process in the photoreceptors is perfectly normal, but the neighboring RPE is defective, which is why the photoreceptors die.

Mar 7, 2007 - 6:19:25 PM

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