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Latest Research : Cancer
  Last Updated: Nov 2, 2013 - 11:52:55 AM

Latest Research
Biological therapy with cediranib improves survival in women with recurrent ovarian cancer
Women with ovarian cancer that has recurred after chemotherapy have survived for longer after treatment with a biological therapy called cediranib, according to new results to be presented today (Monday) at the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1].
Sep 30, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
The State of Oncology 2013
A proposal for a new financing model to tackle the major disparities that exist in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of cancer in countries worldwide has been presented at the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECCO 2013). While much progress has been made against cancer over the last century, a new report brings together evidence that not every patient benefits from it, nor even has the opportunity to benefit. The economics of cancer are daunting and the current model of financing is broken, said Professor Peter Boyle, President of the International Prevention Research Institute (Lyon, France) and Director of the Institute of Global Public Health of the University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, United Kingdom and Lyon, France) in a presentation entitled 'The State of Oncology'.
Sep 30, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Research shows how aspirin may act on blood platelets to improve survival in colon cancer patients
Researchers believe they have discovered how aspirin improves survival in patients diagnosed with colon cancer, the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1] heard today (Monday).
Sep 30, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
First estimate of radiotherapy dose wasted in compensating for between-treatment tumor growth
For the first time, researchers have estimated the daily dose of radiotherapy that could be wasted in compensating for cancer cell growth that occurs overnight and during weekends in patients with early breast cancer.
Sep 30, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Identifying the disease-causing mechanisms in cancers with unknown primary site improves treatment
Identifying the molecular profile of a tumour where the primary site is unknown is crucial to the choice of treatment, the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1], will hear on Monday. In up to five percent of all cancers, the site of the primary tumour is unknown and the disease is not diagnosed until it is at an advanced stage, when the cancer has metastasised (spread to other parts of the body). Until recently, the choice of treatment has been based on efforts to find biomarkers that could indicate the site of origin, but now a team of researchers has succeeded in identifying the particular molecular profiles of the metastatic tumours in a large group of patients. This is a major step on the road to being able to offer effective treatment to these patients, researchers say.
Sep 29, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New approaches to testing cancer drugs needed -- ESMO press commentary
Lugano, Switzerland, 28th September -- Research institutes, regulators and the pharmaceutical industry are urged to cooperate to develop new approaches to testing cancer drugs, in order to bring the revolution in personalised medicine to patients across Europe, says the European Society for Medical Oncology.
Sep 29, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Penn Medicine researcher unveils findings on 2 new weapons against thyroid cancer
AMSTERDAM -- For many years, patients with advanced thyroid cancer faced bleak prospects and no viable treatment options. But now, building on recent discoveries about the genetics and cell signaling pathways of thyroid tumors, researchers are developing exciting new weapons against the disease, using kinase inhibitors that target tumor cell division and blood vessels. Two recent clinical trials led by a researcher from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania showcase the great promise of these new approaches. The work will be presented at the European Cancer Congress (ECCO 17 - ESMO 38 - ESTRO 32) in Amsterdam today.
Sep 28, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Young patients with metastatic colorectal cancer are at high risk of disease progression and death
Younger patients with colorectal cancer that has spread (metastasised) to other parts of the body represent a high-risk group that is less likely to respond to anti-cancer treatments. Their disease is more likely to progress and they are at greater risk of death than other age groups, according to new research to be presented to the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1] today (Sunday).
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Longest follow-up of melanoma patients treated with ipilimumab shows some survive up to 10 years
Patients with advanced melanoma, who have been treated with the monoclonal antibody, ipilimumab, can survive for up to ten years, according to the largest analysis of overall survival for these patients, presented at the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1] today (Saturday).
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Treating chest lymph nodes in early breast cancer patients improves survival
Giving radiation therapy to the lymph nodes located behind the breast bone and above the collar bone to patients with early breast cancer improves overall survival without increasing side effects. This new finding ends the uncertainty about whether the beneficial effect of radiation therapy in such patients was simply the result of irradiation of the breast area, or whether it treated cancer cells in the local lymph nodes as well, the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1] will hear today (Saturday).
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Everolimus slows disease progression in advanced papillary kidney cancer patients
The first Phase II study to investigate the use of the anti-cancer drug, everolimus, for the initial treatment of advanced papillary kidney cancer has shown that it is successful in slowing or preventing the spread of the disease, according to research to be presented today (Sunday) at the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1].
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Hyperfractionated radiotherapy improves survival in head and neck cancer patients
The use of an intensified form of radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancers can improve overall survival rates compared with standard radiation therapy, according to results from a large study to be presented today (Saturday) at the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1].
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Diabetes increases the risk of developing and dying from breast and colon cancer
Diabetes is linked to an increased risk of developing cancer, and now researchers have performed a unique meta-analysis that excludes all other causes of death and found that diabetic patients not only have an increased risk of developing breast and colon cancer but an even higher risk of dying from them.
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Colorectal cancer screening works
Screening for colorectal cancer (CRC) in European countries is highly effective in reducing mortality from the disease. Some of the resources currently being devoted to breast and prostate screening programmes, where the evidence of effectiveness is much less clear-cut, should be reallocated to the early detection of CRC, the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013) [1] will hear today (Sunday).
Sep 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New NIH-funded resource focuses on use of genomic variants in medical care
Three grants totaling more than $25 million over four years will help three research groups to develop authoritative information on the millions of genomic variants relevant to human disease and the hundreds that are expected to be useful for clinical practice. The awards are from the National Institutes of Health.
Sep 25, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Physicians experience increased effort, uncertainty in cross-coverage of radiation oncology patients
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. -- Radiation oncology physicians who encounter an unfamiliar case when cross covering for another physician experience higher levels of perceived workload and may perhaps also effects on performance, according to research conducted at the University of North Carolina.
Sep 25, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Penn Medicine study: Proton therapy cuts side effects for pediatric head and neck cancer patients
ATLANTA -- The precise targeting and limited dosing of radiation via proton therapy is proving to be an advantage in ongoing efforts to reduce treatment side effects among head and neck cancer patients, according to a new study of pediatric patients from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The results were presented Monday at the 55th annual meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conference.
Sep 24, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Mayo-led study: Drug fails to reduce diarrhea in patients receiving radiation therapy
ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Sulfasalazine, a drug commonly prescribed to reduce diarrhea in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, does not reduce diarrhea in patients receiving radiation therapy for cancers in the pelvic area a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. The study also found that the medication may be associated with a higher risk of diarrhea than a placebo when used during radiation therapy to the pelvis. The results were presented today at the American Society of Radiation Oncology's (ASTRO's) 55th Annual Meeting in Atlanta.
Sep 24, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
First randomized trial of targeted cancer medicine in all tumor types
A further step along the road to the personalisation of cancer medicine, where treatment is based on the individual molecular characteristics of tumours rather than their primary site, will be presented at the 2013 European Cancer Congress (ECC2013), which starts on Friday 27 September in Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Sep 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
US faces crisis in cancer care, says new IOM report
WASHINGTON -- Delivery of cancer care in the U.S. is facing a crisis stemming from a combination of factors -- a growing demand for such care, a shrinking oncology work force, rising costs of cancer care, and the complexity of the disease and its treatment, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. The report recommends ways to respond to these challenges and improve cancer care delivery, including by strengthening clinicians' core competencies in caring for patients with cancer, shifting to team-based models of care, and communicating more effectively with patients.
Sep 10, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Static killers?
Since its discovery in the early 1990s, the protein STAT1 (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1) has been found to be central in passing signals across immune cells, ensuring that our bodies react quickly and appropriately to threats from viruses or other pathogens. Animals without STAT1 are also prone to develop cancer, suggesting that STAT1 is somehow involved in protection against malignant cells. The STAT1 protein is known to be phosphorylated on at least two positions: phosphorylation of a particular tyrosine (tyr-701) is required for the protein to enter the cell nucleus (where it exerts its effects), while subsequent phosphorylation of a serine residue alters the way it interacts with other proteins, thereby affecting its function.
Sep 6, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
ESMO bestows its highest accolades to eminent oncologists
Lugano, Switzerland -- The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), the leading pan-European organisation representing medical oncology professionals, announced today the recipients of the annual society's prestigious awards, recognising excellence in oncology.
Sep 4, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Covance and the Indiana CTSI to collaborate on early clinical research
PRINCETON, N.J., and INDIANAPOLIS -- Covance Inc. (NYSE: CVD), a leading global drug development services company, and the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, part of the Indiana University School of Medicine, today announced an agreement to collaborate in conducting early clinical trials for new medicines on behalf of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies.
Sep 4, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
4 UCLA stem cell researchers receive CIRM Early Translational grants
Four researchers from UCLA's Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have received Early Translational Research Awards totaling approximately $13 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the state's stem cell agency. The UCLA researchers received four of the 12 total awards; no other institution received more than one.
Sep 3, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Collagen clue reveals new drug target for untreatable form of lung cancer
Collagen, the stuff of ligaments and skin, and the most abundant protein in the human body, has an extraordinary role in triggering chemical signals that help protect the body from cancer, a new study reveals.
Aug 29, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Notre Dame and Moi University join research efforts to shed light on breast cancer
Breast cancer is a major health problem worldwide and the incidence of the disease is rising across Africa.
Aug 29, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Chromosome 21 abnormality tells oncologists to treat pediatric ALL more aggressively
A recent study by members of the Children's Oncology Group reports results of a large trial showing that children whose leukemia cells have amplification of a portion of chromosome 21 may require more aggressive treatment for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) than children without this gene amplification.
Aug 20, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Cancer's origins revealed
Researchers have provided the first comprehensive compendium of mutational processes that drive tumour development. Together, these mutational processes explain most mutations found in 30 of the most common cancer types. This new understanding of cancer development could help to treat and prevent a wide-range of cancers.
Aug 14, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
UCLA prostate cancer research program receives $11.6 million federal grant
UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the department of urology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA have been notified that their standing as a National Cancer Institute Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) site in prostate cancer has been renewed for another five years.
Aug 6, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Professor Sir David Weatherall, M.D., recieves 2013 Wallace H. Coulter Award
The American Society of Hematology (ASH) will present the Society's highest honor, the 2013 Wallace H. Coulter Award for Lifetime Achievement in Hematology, to Professor Sir David Weatherall, MD, of the University of Oxford for his more than 50-year career in hematology combining seminal discoveries, visionary translational research leadership, and a passion for global health initiatives that have together helped improve clinical care for thousands throughout the developing world.
Aug 1, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Technique filters cancer where chemo can't reach
A cancer therapy that removes malignant cells from a patient's cerebrospinal fluid may soon be available to prevent metastases and decrease complications of cancers involving the brain, according to Penn State medical researchers.
Jul 30, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Could sleeping stem cells hold key to treatment of aggressive blood cancer?
Scientists studying an aggressive form of leukaemia have discovered that rather than displacing healthy stem cells in the bone marrow as previously believed, the cancer is putting them to sleep to prevent them forming new blood cells.
Jul 29, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
82 percent of adults support banning smoking when kids are in the car
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- A new poll shows 82 percent of adults support banning smoking in cars when children under 13 are riding in the vehicle.
Jul 22, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Molecular switch controls the destiny of self-eating cells
The study is the result of a collaboration of scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, University of Michigan, and University of California San Diego, USA, who were interested in finding out whether autophagy can be affected by events in the cell nucleus. Surprisingly, they discovered that a signal chain in the nucleus serves as a kind of molecular switch that determines whether the cell dies or survives.
Jul 17, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Self-perpetuating signals may drive tumor cells to spread
Singapore - A team of international researchers from Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (USA) has identified a self-perpetuating signaling circuit inside connective tissue cells that allows these cells to form a front and a back and propel themselves in a particular direction over a long period of time. This propulsion is the same movement that tumor cells use to invade healthy tissue during cancer metastasis so cracking the code to this signaling network may lead to new therapeutic strategies against cancer and other devastating diseases.
Jul 16, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Gammapod developed at University of Maryland School of Medicine targets early-stage breast cancer
An experimental innovation in cancer treatment from the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine could provide a new, high-precision, noninvasive method of treating early-stage breast cancer. The GammaPod was invented by Cedric Yu, M.S., D.Sc., the Carl M. Mansfield Endowed Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology, who patented the technology in 2006. Although the device has not yet been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be used on patients, the manufacturer is actively seeking that approval and the department hopes to begin clinical trials as soon as October 2013.
Jul 11, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Immune-boosting colorectal cancer drug shows promise
Lugano-Barcelona-- New data on an emerging treatment that aims to fight colorectal cancer by stimulating the immune system have been presented at the ESMO 15th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer.
Jul 3, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
A circuitous route to therapy resistance
Gliomas are malignant brain tumors that arise from glial cells called astrocytes, found in the central nervous system. In treating malignant gliomas, we currently combine radiotherapy with the anticancer drug temozolomide. However, in some patients, tumors rapidly become resistant to both treatment methods, says neurooncologist Professor Dr. Michael Platten, who leads a cooperation unit of the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) and the Department of Neurooncology of Heidelberg University Hospital. We therefore urgently need new methods of treating these diseases more effectively.
Jun 26, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New medication treats drug-resistant prostate cancer in the laboratory
A new drug called pyrvinium pamoate inhibits aggressive forms of prostate cancer that are resistant to standard drugs, according to a study conducted in an animal model. The results will be presented Monday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.
Jun 17, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Major grant funds UCSC researchers using big data to predict cancer outcomes
Despite some successes, predicting cancer outcomes based on the molecular signatures in cancer cells remains a major challenge. A new effort, funded by the National Cancer Institute and led by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, aims to clear several key roadblocks that have stymied progress in this field.
Jun 17, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Source of tumor growth in aggressive prostate cancer found
SAN FRANCISCO-Researchers have discovered a molecular switch that explains, at least in part, how some fast-growing prostate cancers become resistant to hormone treatment, a new study conducted in human cell cultures and mice finds. The results were presented Saturday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.
Jun 15, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Osteoporosis drug may help treat advanced hormone-sensitive breast cancer
A new osteoporosis drug hinders the growth of estrogen-sensitive cancer that has become resistant to treatment with tamoxifen, a study in mice shows. The results will be presented Saturday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.
Jun 15, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
'Gene signature' test diagnoses benign thyroid growths
A new genetic test accurately and consistently diagnoses benign growths, or nodules, on the thyroid gland, according to a study from Chile. The results will be presented Saturday at The Endocrine Society's 95th Annual Meeting in San Francisco.
Jun 15, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Osteoporosis drug stops growth of breast cancer cells, even in resistant tumors
DURHAM, N.C. -- A drug approved in Europe to treat osteoporosis has now been shown to stop the growth of breast cancer cells, even in cancers that have become resistant to current targeted therapies, according to a Duke Cancer Institute study.
Jun 15, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Second annual Brain Tumor Biotech Summit 2013 at Weill Cornell
NEW YORK (June 7, 2013) -- The nation's leading brain tumor and biotech industry experts again joined forces Friday, June 7, in a bidto accelerate more effective treatments for brain tumors and promote funding for the latest emerging therapies, as the Weill Cornell Brain and Spine Center and Voices Against Brain Cancer hosted its second annual Brain Tumor Biotech Summit.
Jun 7, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
EORTC study shows radiotherapy and surgery provide regional control for breast cancer patients
Final analysis of the EORTC 10981-22023 AMAROS (After Mapping of the Axilla: Radiotherapy Or Surgery?) trial has shown that both axillary lymph node dissection and axillary radiotherapy provide excellent regional control for breast cancer patients with a positive sentinel node biopsy. The AMAROS trial also found that axillary radiotherapy reduces the risk of short term and long-term lymphoedema as compared to axillary lymph node dissection.
Jun 3, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
RET rearrangement a new oncogene and potential target in lung cancer
In results presented at ASCO 2013, a University of Colorado Cancer Center study provides important details for a recently identified driver and target in lung adenocarcinoma: rearrangement of the gene RET. The finding is an important step along a trajectory like that which led to FDA approval of the drug crizotinib, which targets a somewhat similar rearrangement in the ALK gene. By comparison, the ALK rearrangement is present in 3-5 percent of lung cancers whereas the present study found RET rearrangements present in 8 of 51 (15.7 percent) of an enriched cohort of patient samples that did not show evidence of other oncogene alterations.
Jun 2, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Therapy that heats and destroys bone tumors eases patients' pain
(CHICAGO) Patients with cancer that has spread to their bones are often treated with radiation therapy to reduce pain. But if that treatment doesn't work, or can't be used again, a second, effective option now exists. Results of a clinical trial on the new therapy, presented by a researcher at Jefferson's Kimmel Cancer Center, is being presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).
Jun 2, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
US oncologists report high career satisfaction, yet many suffer symptoms of burnout
CHICAGO -- Even though a majority of U.S. oncologists report satisfaction with their careers, many say they have experienced at least one symptom of burnout, a Mayo Clinic-led study has found. The study was released during the American Society of Clinical Oncology's annual meeting in Chicago.
Jun 2, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research
Colon cancer screening: Immunological tests are superior
For early detection of colorectal (colon) cancer, statutory health insurance in Germany offers a fecal occult blood test free of charge to all insured persons starting at 50 years of age. In addition, those 55 or older are entitled to an endoscopic examination of the colon (colonoscopy). Colonoscopy identifies precancerous lesions with a high level of exactitude. Nevertheless, only about 20-30 percent of those eligible actually take advantage of the screening examination. Therefore, fecal occult blood tests are important, because they help us reach more people. People are much more willing to have a simple laboratory test. Hence it is all the more important for these tests to provide valuable results, says Professor Hermann Brenner from the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ).
May 27, 2013 - 4:00:00 AM

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