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Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
  Last Updated: Nov 2, 2013 - 11:52:55 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Abiraterone has been approved for men with metastatic prostate cancer that is no longer responsive to therapy with hormones and docetaxel
Abiraterone (trade name: Zytiga®) has been approved since September 2011 for men with metastatic prostate cancer that is no longer responsive to hormone therapy and progresses further during or after therapy with the cytostatic drug docetaxel.
Jan 8, 2012 - 6:23:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Virus associated with prostate cancer tumors and chronic fatigue syndrome unlikely to be the cause
A study that includes authors at UC Davis has found that a retrovirus associated with prostate cancer tumors and chronic fatigue syndrome that evolved in laboratory mice less than two decades ago is unlikely to be widespread in humans and the cause of either disease. The study of the retrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus, or XMRV, appears online in the journal Science.

Jun 4, 2011 - 5:56:09 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Acupuncture helps with side effects of prostate cancer treatment
Acupuncture provides long-lasting relief to hot flashes, heart palpitations and anxiety due to side effects of the hormone given to counteract testosterone, the hormone that induces prostate cancer, according to a study published in the April issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology•Biology•Physics, an official journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

Apr 22, 2011 - 5:21:58 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Surgery superior to drug therapy for symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy
A 17-year-long community study looking at symptoms of enlarged prostate in over 2,000 men age 40 to 79 years suggests that surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) offers more relief from incontinence and obstruction symptoms than treatment from drug-based therapy, according to a new study by researchers at Mayo Clinic.
May 29, 2010 - 2:49:12 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Intermittent Androgen Suppression Therapy in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer
Intermittent androgen suppression therapy seems to be as effective as continuous androgen deprivation while showing tolerability and quality of life advantages, according to a study published in the January issue of European Urology, the official journal of the European Association of Urology.
Jan 5, 2010 - 1:57:06 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Inhibition of TNF-receptor associated protein-1possible treatment for prostatic cancer
Current research suggests that TNF-receptor associated protein-1 (TRAP-1) may prevent cancer cell death. The related report by Leav et al, "Cytoprotective Mitochondrial Chaperone TRAP-1 as a Novel Molecular Target in Localized and Metastatic Prostate Cancer," appears in the January 2010 issue of the American Journal of Pathology.
Dec 30, 2009 - 1:28:29 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Oncologists present test to predict survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and Source MDx today
announced that Source MDx’s whole blood RNA transcript-based Precision Profiles™ diagnostic test predicted survival in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In a study of 62 CRPC patients, the model separated patients into a high risk group (survival less than 2.2 years) and a low risk group (survival greater than 2.2 years) (log rank p=0.00083).

Mar 1, 2009 - 9:13:14 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
PSA levels appear to be predictive of three year prostate cancer risk in African-American men
PSA levels appear to be more predictive of three year prostate cancer risk in African-American men compared with Caucasian men with a family history of prostate cancer, according to a paper published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
Feb 25, 2009 - 12:43:24 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Survey on PSA screening in young men
A new analysis finds that one in five men in their 40s has had a prostate specific antigen (PSA) test within the previous year and that young black men are more likely than young white men to have undergone the test. The study, published in the September 15, 2008 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, provides valuable information as experts discuss possible changes to prostate cancer screening recommendations.
Aug 11, 2008 - 8:48:13 AM

Latest Research
New, noninvasive prostate cancer test beats PSA in detecting prostate cancer
An experimental biomarker test developed by researchers at the University of Michigan more accurately detects prostate cancer than any other screening method currently in use, according to a study published in the February 1 issue of Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Feb 5, 2008 - 10:25:00 PM

Latest Research
Statin use linked with decreased prostate cancer mortality rates; lower PSA levels
ANAHEIM, Ca. (May 20, 2007) -- Urologists and researchers have postulated in recent years that statin medications could have an impact on the growth and progression of prostate cancer. Cholesterol is a primary building block for testosterone, which has in turn been linked with prostate tumor growth (less testosterone results in slower-growing tumors). In recent years, research has indicated a possible link between dietary fat intake and prostate cancer. Research presented today at the 102nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association explores the effect statin medications (which work to reduce low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, levels) may have on prostate-specific antigen, the incidence of prostate cancer, and mortality due to prostate cancer. A special session for members of the media was held on May 20 at 11:00 a.m. and moderated by AUA spokesman Anthony Y. Smith, M.D. of the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.
May 22, 2007 - 10:00:00 AM

Latest Research
New research supports early testing for prostate cancer
Prostate cancer is the third-leading cause of cancer deaths among American men and is most treatable when caught in its earliest stages. Research presented today during the 102nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association in Anaheim, Ca. provided further evidence supporting regular prostate-cancer screening and offered new insights into disease progression and the hormonal treatment of recurrent disease. A special session for media highlighting this research was held on May 20 at 9:00 a.m. PDT and was moderated by AUA spokesman Christopher L. Amling, M.D.
May 20, 2007 - 10:05:00 AM

Latest Research
Genetic marker linked to aggressive prostate cancer
Northwestern University researchers have discovered that a recently identified genetic marker for prostate cancer is linked to a highly aggressive form of the disease.
May 20, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Study identifies multiple genetic risk factors for prostate cancer
A study led by researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) and Harvard Medical School has identified seven genetic risk factors—DNA sequences carried by some people but not others—that predict risk for prostate cancer. According to the study's findings, these risk factors are clustered in a single region of the human genome on chromosome 8 and powerfully predict a man's probability of developing prostate cancer. The paper will be published in the online edition of Nature Genetics on April 1.

Apr 1, 2007 - 11:49:08 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Soy-rich Japanese diet decreases the risk of localized prostate cancer, increases the risk of advanced prostate cancer- Study reports
The largest study examining the relationship between the traditional soy-rich Japanese diet and development of prostate cancer in Japanese men has come to a seemingly contradictory conclusion: intake of isoflavone chemicals, derived largely from soy foods, decreased the risk of localized prostate cancer but increased the risk of advanced prostate cancer.
Mar 27, 2007 - 12:49:40 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Green tea and COX-2 inhibitors combine to slow growth of prostate cancer
Drinking a nice warm cup of green tea has long been touted for its healthful benefits, both real and anecdotal. But now researchers have found that a component of green tea, combined with low doses of a COX-2 inhibitor, could slow the spread of human prostate cancer.
Mar 1, 2007 - 5:34:47 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Prostate brachytherapy causes fewer side effects than surgery
Men with prostate cancer have a slightly better long-term side effects profile with radiation seed implants than they do with surgery, according to a study released today in the International Journal for Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, the official journal of ASTRO.
Feb 28, 2007 - 10:13:20 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Researcher identifies men who require second prostate biopsy
A researcher in the Oregon Health & Science University Cancer Institute and Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center has found a way to identify which men need a second prostate biopsy because they may be harboring life-threatening prostate cancer even though they were given a clean bill of health after their first biopsy. Mark Garzotto, M.D., has been invited to present his findings on Thursday, Feb. 22, at the Multidisciplinary Prostate Cancer Symposium in Orlando, Fla. He is the director of urologic oncology at the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, assistant professor of surgery (urology) in the OHSU School of Medicine, and member of the OHSU Cancer Institute. Also involved in the research is Shane Rogosin, M.D., resident, in general internal medicine, and geriatrics, OHSU School of Medicine.
Feb 22, 2007 - 10:07:18 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Prostate cancer less likely to spread when treated with higher dose of radiation
New research suggests that men with prostate cancer who choose radiation therapy should seek treatment centers that will offer high-dose radiation. A new study from Fox Chase Cancer Center finds that higher doses of 74 to 82 Gray (Gy) greatly reduce the risk that the cancer will spread later--even 8-10 years after treatment. The results of the study were presented today at the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology in Philadelphia.
Nov 24, 2006 - 11:46:47 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Gene therapy study takes aim at prostate cancer
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) are hoping a new gene therapy that takes a gene called RTVP-1 directly into the prostate tumor will prove effective in preventing recurrence of the disease. The first phase of the study is designed to test the safety of the treatment and determine the proper dosage of gene, said Dr. Dov Kadmon, professor of urology at BCM. It will be carried out in the department of urology at BCM as well as at Ben Taub General Hospital, The Methodist Hospital and Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
Sep 26, 2006 - 10:41:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Pain associated with prostatic biopsy is related to the site biopsied
Researchers at Mayo Clinic have evaluated the major sources of pain for some men during in-office prostate biopsy and an anesthetic method that can best lessen it. Findings will be presented in two abstracts Thursday at the annual meeting of the North Central Section of the American Urological Association in San Diego.
Sep 15, 2006 - 3:02:00 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Admixture mapping reveals locus for prostate cancer risk
Harvard Medical School researchers have identified a DNA segment on chromosome 8 that is a major risk factor for prostate cancer, especially in African American men. The paper appears in the August 21 electronic edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Aug 22, 2006 - 4:24:00 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Diet modification and stress reduction may attenuate progression of prostate cancer
Statistics say that one out of six American men will develop prostate cancer and more than a third of them will experience a recurrence after undergoing treatment, putting them at high risk to die of the disease.
Aug 15, 2006 - 10:18:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Prostatic Irradiation Doesn’t Lead To Any Appreciable Increase in Rectal Cancer Risk
Men who receive radiation therapy for prostate cancer are not at any appreciable increased risk of developing rectal cancer compared to those not given radiation therapy, according to a new study published in the July 1, 2006, issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, the official journal of ASTRO, the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.
Jul 4, 2006 - 12:12:00 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Pomegranate Juice Slows PSA Acceleration Rate
Pomegranate juice packs a punch on prostate cancer that prolongs post-surgery PSA doubling time, drives down cancer cell proliferation and causes prostate cancer cells to die, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of Clinical Cancer Research. Researchers at the Jonsson Cancer Center at UCLA reported that patients with recurrent prostate cancer who drank pomegranate after surgery or radiation treatment saw their PSA blood content levels double after about 54 months. By comparison, PSA levels in the same patients prior to drinking the daily doses of eight-ounce pomegranate juice accelerated more quickly, doubling their PSA levels in only 15 months.
Jul 1, 2006 - 5:33:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Pomegranate juice could kill cancer cells
Drinking an eight ounce glass of pomegranate juice daily could slow the progress of prostate cancer, minimise cell damage and could also kill cancer cells, finds a new study. Researchers led by Allan Pantuck at the University of California, Los Angeles, studied 50 men who had undergone surgery or radiation treatment for prostate cancer - but had shown signs that the disease was rapidly returning.
Jul 1, 2006 - 2:57:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Early estrogen exposure leads to later prostate cancer risk
A study in the June 1 issue of Cancer Research presents the first evidence that exposure to low doses of environmental estrogens during development of the prostate gland in the male fetus may result in a predisposition to prostate cancer later in life.
Jun 1, 2006 - 12:53:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
JHDM2A enzyme induced H3K9 demethylation offers new look at male hormone regulation
For the second time in less than a year, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill scientists have purified a novel protein and have shown it can alter gene activity by reversing a molecular modification previously thought permanent.
May 7, 2006 - 3:15:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
What is the appropriate age to stop prostate cancer screening?
Screening for prostate cancer in older men has been problematic. While this form of cancer can be fatal, it often progresses so slowly that men are more likely to die from some other disease. Aggressive treatments such as radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy may eradicate the cancer but have negative effects on quality of life. More conservative treatments may preserve quality of life, but may not be appropriate for those cases where the disease is progressing more quickly. In the face of these uncertainties, what is the appropriate age to stop screening?
May 3, 2006 - 12:46:00 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
High cholesterol may contribute to prostate cancer
High cholesterol may contribute to the development of prostate cancer although further studies are needed to confirm the results, say scientists.
Apr 12, 2006 - 6:11:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Human infections documented with a native rodent retrovirus
Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers and their colleagues have discovered a new retrovirus in humans that is closely related to a cancer-causing virus found in mice. Their findings describe the first documented cases of human infection with a retrovirus that is native to rodents.
Mar 31, 2006 - 12:51:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Alterations in DNA methylation is a better indicator of prostate cancer
Researchers at Mayo Clinic have narrowed the search for effective prostate cancer biomarkers (genetic variations that point to a specific disease or condition), identifying changes in the expression of genes of the whole genome closely correlated to prostate cancer development and progression. They also showed that DNA hypermethylation (DNA modification without changing sequence) plays a significant role in these processes. Results of their study were published in the Feb. 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.
Mar 28, 2006 - 9:16:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Prostate treatment decisions based on perception more than fact
Men with prostate cancer generally make treatment decisions based on differences in the information they receive rather than their own preferences, according to a new review. Published in the May 1, 2006 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the review of studies in prostate cancer decision making suggests that a lack of medical evidence and consistent, comprehensive messages about therapeutic options compel men to turn to a wide variety of popular and biased sources, which influence their decision. This approach often results in treatments that do not generally reflect patients' goals.
Mar 27, 2006 - 4:23:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Older men with early prostate cancer survived longer with treatment vs. observation
A new study shows older men with early stage prostate cancer survive longer if they are treated versus not being treated in favor of the "watchful waiting" approach advocated by many physicians for older men with other health problems. In addition, the study revealed a survival benefit for men treated with radiation therapy making it the first study to demonstrate a survival advantage in an older population.
Feb 26, 2006 - 5:31:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Cabbage, cauliflower and turmeric please!
Rutgers researchers have found that the curry spice turmeric holds real potential for the treatment and prevention of prostate cancer, particularly when combined with certain vegetables
Jan 17, 2006 - 1:33:00 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Speed of PSA increase is a better prognostic marker
In the largest study of its kind to date, Mayo Clinic researchers report that prostate specific antigen (PSA) kinetics, both velocity and doubling time, can be used to predict disease progression and likelihood of death after radical prostatectomy surgery, suggesting that this could be used to guide treatment decisions.
Nov 12, 2005 - 8:03:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Pomegranate Juice to Combat Prostate Cancer
With more than 230,000 new cases of prostate cancer expected to be diagnosed this year alone in the U.S. and the outlook poor for patients with metastatic disease, researchers are looking for new strategies to combat the disease. Earlier research at Wisconsin and elsewhere has shown that the pomegranate, a fruit native to the Middle East, is rich in anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity and is effective against tumors in mouse skin. In fact, pomegranate juice has higher anti-oxidant activity than do red wine and green tea, both of which appear promising as anti-cancer agents.
Sep 27, 2005 - 9:12:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
EphB2 mutation linked with prostate cancer risk in african-americans
Researchers have identified a gene mutation that may increase the risk of prostate cancer up to three times in African-American men with a family history of the disease.
Sep 21, 2005 - 7:10:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Committee Supports New Indication for EGFR Inhibitor Erlotinib
OSI Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: OSIP) and Genentech, Inc. (NYSE: DNA) announced today that the Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee (ODAC) appointed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) voted 10 to 3 in favor of recommending approval of Tarceva® (erlotinib) in combination with gemcitabine for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer in patients who have not received previous chemotherapy. Tarceva is the first drug in a Phase III trial to have shown a significant improvement in overall survival when added to gemcitabine chemotherapy in first-line pancreatic cancer. Tarceva is an oral tablet currently approved for use in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) for patients whose disease has progressed after one or more courses of chemotherapy. The FDA will now review the ODAC recommendation and a decision on Tarceva approval is anticipated by November 2, 2005.
Sep 14, 2005 - 9:32:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
PSA remains the best indicator of cancer recurrence after surgery
Despite recent claims by some urologists that measuring the blood protein prostate-specific antigen (PSA) may not be effective in predicting risk of prostate cancer, a Johns Hopkins study of more than 2,000 men confirms that PSA remains the best measure of the likelihood of cancer recurrence after surgery.
Sep 13, 2005 - 4:32:00 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Expensive robot-assisted prostate surgery has possible benefits
Although minimally invasive prostate removal aided by a robot can lead to less blood loss, shorter hospital stays and fewer complications, there is no evidence that the procedure improves cure rates, according to a new technology assessment.
Aug 29, 2005 - 10:31:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Predicting prostate cancer outcome with activated Stat5 protein
Researchers from Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center at Georgetown University found that testing for an activated Stat5 protein in prostate tumor tissue effectively predicts which men have a form of prostate cancer that may become more aggressive and life threatening.
Aug 15, 2005 - 5:47:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
PSA velocity shown to be associated with tumor stage
Men who have a higher rate of increase in their PSA value in the year prior to their prostate cancer diagnosis have a significantly higher risk of death following radiation therapy, according to a study in this issue of JAMA.
Jul 29, 2005 - 12:47:00 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Predicting risk of death after radical prostatectomy
Clinical factors including the time to biochemical recurrence following surgery can help predict the risk of prostate cancer death for patients following a radical prostatectomy, according to a study in the July 27 issue of JAMA
Jul 28, 2005 - 11:17:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Normal life after radiation for prostate cancer
Men receiving radiation therapy to combat early-stage prostate cancer are still able to achieve an erection and face a low rate of incontinence one year following treatment, according to a new study published in the July 15, 2005 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, the official journal of ASTRO, the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology.
Jul 16, 2005 - 12:00:00 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Continuum of prostate cancer risk at all values of PSA - Study
A new study indicates there is no specific PSA value that has both high sensitivity and high specificity for monitoring healthy men for prostate cancer, but rather there is a continuum of prostate cancer risk at all values of PSA, according to a study in the July 6 issue of JAMA.
Jul 8, 2005 - 1:29:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Hyperthermia Therapy as a New Approach to Treat Prostate Cancer
BSD Medical Corp. (AMEX:BSM) has announced the conclusion of a highly successful conference of the 2005 annual European Society of Hyperthermic Oncology (ESHO) held in Graz, Austria, in which major breakthroughs in therapies tied to BSD's cancer treatment equipment were reported. Of the 74 presentations made at the conference, some of the highlights are being reported in several follow-up press releases.
Jun 21, 2005 - 9:41:00 PM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen Emerging as an Important Therapeutic Target to Deal with Prostate Cancer
The license provides PDC with rights to utilize the ADC technology to link cell-killing drug payloads to PDC's fully human monoclonal antibodies that target prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), which is highly expressed on both primary and metastatic prostate cancer cells.
Jun 21, 2005 - 10:50:00 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Delaying radiation for prostate cancer does not affect outcome
For men diagnosed with prostate cancer, there is no risk of recurrence if external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is delayed by several months. A study published in the July 15, 2005 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, finds delays of EBRT had no harmful impact on clinical outcome or biochemical marker levels in low-, intermediate- and high-risk patients.
Jun 14, 2005 - 6:09:00 AM

Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer
Groundbreaking discovery of the ETS-Related Gene (ERG)
Researchers led by Dr. Shiv Srivastava from the Center for Prostate Disease Research (CPDR), Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), report the groundbreaking discovery of the ETS-Related Gene (ERG) as one of the frequent proto-oncogene overexpressions in prostate cancer cells. This discovery provides a very promising addition to a select group of genes, whose expression is frequently altered in prostate cancer cells and could provide novel molecular targets for diagnosis, prognosis or therapy of prostate cancer in the future.
Jun 12, 2005 - 6:08:00 AM

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