RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
 Asian Health
 Food & Nutrition
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 World Healthcare
   Latest Research
 Alternative Medicine
  Bone Cancer
  Breast Cancer
  Cervical Cancer
  Gastric Cancer
  Liver Cancer
  Nerve Tissue
  Ovarian Cancer
  Pancreatic Cancer
  Prostate Cancer
  Rectal Cancer
  Renal Cell Carcinoma
  Risk Factors
  Testicular Cancer
 Clinical Trials
 Infectious Diseases
 Sports Medicine
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
   Special Topics
 Odd Medical News

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Prostate Cancer Channel

subscribe to Prostate Cancer newsletter
Latest Research : Cancer : Prostate Cancer

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Early estrogen exposure leads to later prostate cancer risk

Jun 1, 2006 - 12:53:00 PM , Reviewed by: Priya Saxena
"Most remarkably, early BPA exposure sensitized the prostate to precancerous lesions brought on by exposure of the adult animal to elevated estradiol,"

[RxPG] A study in the June 1 issue of Cancer Research presents the first evidence that exposure to low doses of environmental estrogens during development of the prostate gland in the male fetus may result in a predisposition to prostate cancer later in life.

The study, done in an animal model, also demonstrates how the predisposition may arise, and a way to identify those at risk.

Man-made compounds that can mimic the hormone action of estrogens (xenoestrogens) are widespread in the environment. One of these agents is bisphenol A (BPA), used in the manufacture of plastics and epoxy resins. The United States alone produces over 1.6 million pounds of BPA annually. BPA, which can also leach from plastics when heated, turns up in human blood and in placental and fetal tissues in even higher concentrations.

In this study, a research team led by Dr. Gail Prins of the University of Illinois at Chicago and Dr. Shuk-Mei Ho of the University of Cincinnati exposed rats to low doses of estradiol, a natural estrogen, or to BPA during the developmental period corresponding to the second and third trimester of human pregnancy. They found that this early exposure predisposed male rats to precancerous lesions of the prostate in old age.

"Most remarkably, early BPA exposure sensitized the prostate to precancerous lesions brought on by exposure of the adult animal to elevated estradiol," said Prins, professor of urology at UIC and senior author of the study. "This is highly relevant to people, because relative estradiol levels increase in aging men as a result of their increased body fat and declining testosterone levels."

The doses of estradiol and BPA used in the study were similar to levels found in human serum; in the circulation of some pregnant women; and in the fetus. Transfer of BPA from mother to fetus has been reported, and levels in male fetuses have been shown to be higher than those of female fetuses.

The researchers were able to demonstrate that early estrogen or BPA exposure permanently changed the methylation, or tagging, of specific stretches of DNA in the neonate's prostate cells, a phenomenon referred to as epigenetic reprogramming. In epigenetic reprogramming, gene expression is altered without changing DNA sequences or content. Several of the epigenetically altered sites turned out to be in important genes that regulate cellular functions.

The researchers conclude that exposure to environmental estrogens, such as BPA, or natural estrogens affect the pattern of gene expression in the prostate during development, and in so doing promote prostate disease with aging.

One of the altered genes, phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4D4), was examined in greater detail. The researchers found that the methylation of PDE4D4 can permanently change its pattern of expression in the prostate. This gene should normally shut down in adult life, but after early exposure to estradiol or BPA, the exposed animals' prostates continued to express it at high levels. Similar high levels due to methylation of the gene were found in prostate cancer cells but not in normal cell lines.

Because the methylation marks of epigenetic reprogramming were found before any disease was observed, the methylation may be useful as a way to identify men at higher prostate disease risk, Prins said, which may have resulted from early exposure to endocrine disruptors.

"These findings are true for an animal model, and application to human prostate disease will await future studies," the authors concluded. Ho is first author of the study and professor and chairman of environmental health at the University of Cincinnati.

Publication: June 1 issue of Cancer Research
On the web: www.uic.edu 

Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.

Related Prostate Cancer News
Abiraterone has been approved for men with metastatic prostate cancer that is no longer responsive to therapy with hormones and docetaxel
Virus associated with prostate cancer tumors and chronic fatigue syndrome unlikely to be the cause
Acupuncture helps with side effects of prostate cancer treatment
Surgery superior to drug therapy for symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy
Intermittent Androgen Suppression Therapy in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer
Inhibition of TNF-receptor associated protein-1possible treatment for prostatic cancer
Oncologists present test to predict survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients
PSA levels appear to be predictive of three year prostate cancer risk in African-American men
Survey on PSA screening in young men
New, noninvasive prostate cancer test beats PSA in detecting prostate cancer

Subscribe to Prostate Cancer Newsletter

Enter your email address:

 Additional information about the news article
Wan-Yee Tang, of the University of Cincinnati, and Jessica Belmonte de Frausto of UIC also contributed to the study, which was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense.
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

Contact us

RxPG Online



    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)