RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
 Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Research Article
Latest Research Channel

subscribe to Latest Research newsletter
Latest Research

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Lithium chloride slows onset of skeletal muscle disorder

Mar 18, 2008 - 4:00:00 AM
The older animals were performing as if they were younger animals, said Kitazawa, a postgraduate researcher of neurobiology and behavior at UCI and co-author of the study. Lithium chloride was delaying their rate of decline.

 
[RxPG] Irvine, Calif., March 18, 2008 -- A new UC Irvine study finds that lithium chloride, a drug used to treat bipolar disorder, can slow the development of inclusion body myositis, a skeletal muscle disease that affects the elderly.

In the study by scientists Frank LaFerla and Masashi Kitazawa, mice genetically engineered to have IBM demonstrated markedly better motor function six months after receiving daily doses of lithium chloride, compared with non-treated mice. The muscles in treated mice also had lower levels of a protein that the study linked to muscle inflammation associated with IBM.

These data are the first to show that lithium chloride is a potential IBM therapy.

Lithium chloride is an approved drug for treating humans. We already know it is safe and can be used by people, said LaFerla, professor of neurobiology and behavior at UCI and co-author of the study. Given our findings, we believe a clinical trial that tests the effectiveness of lithium chloride on IBM patients should be conducted as soon as possible.

Results of the study appear online this month in the journal Annals of Neurology.

IBM is the most common skeletal muscle disorder among people older than 50. People with IBM experience weakness, inflammation and atrophy of muscles in their fingers, wrists, forearms and quadriceps. There is no cure for IBM, nor is there an effective treatment, according to the National Institutes of Health.

LaFerla, a noted Alzheimer's disease researcher, began studying IBM about 10 years ago after learning the disorders have similar tissue characteristics. In the brain, a buildup of phosphorylated tau protein leads to the development of tangles, one of the two lesions that are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. High phospho-tau levels also are present in IBM, though patients do not experience dementia or memory loss. In a previous study,

LaFerla found that lithium chloride reduced phospho-tau levels in mice genetically engineered to develop Alzheimer's disease. LaFerla and his research team then wondered: Could lithium chloride also reduce phospho-tau levels and symptoms in mice with IBM?

First, they sought to determine how the inflammation affects the skeletal muscle fibers. They injected the mice with a drug to trigger muscle inflammation, then put them on tiny treadmills to test their motor function. As expected, mice with inflammation could not keep up with the control mice, indicating reduced motor function. Examining their brain tissue, the scientists discovered the mice with muscle inflammation also had higher levels of phospho-tau.

Through additional testing, they discovered an enzyme called GSK-3 beta was responsible for increasing the tau phosphorylation. Previous studies have shown that same enzyme to cause tau buildup in the Alzheimer's brain.

Next, the scientists sought to block the accumulation of phospho-tau in the IBM mice with the goal of curbing motor function loss. In mice six months of age, one group was fed lithium chloride-laced food for six months, and a second group was fed regular food. At 12 months of age, mice in the first group performed on the treadmill as if they were six months of age, while mice in the second group had reduced motor function. Lithium chloride, the scientists found, blocked the GSK-3 beta enzyme that caused higher levels of phospho-tau.

The older animals were performing as if they were younger animals, said Kitazawa, a postgraduate researcher of neurobiology and behavior at UCI and co-author of the study. Lithium chloride was delaying their rate of decline.

The scientists then sought evidence that their results in mice might translate to humans with IBM. They performed tests on human muscle tissue samples and found the GSK-3 beta enzyme again played a role in the phosphorylation of tau. That was not the case, though, in patients with other muscle disorders. This suggests that our IBM mouse model may have the same skeletal muscle mechanism as in human cases, LaFerla said.




Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related Latest Research News
How do consumers see a product when they hear music?
Drug activates virus against cancer
Bone loss associated with increased production of ROS
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
Crystal methamphetamine use by street youth increases risk of injecting drugs
Johns Hopkins-led study shows increased life expectancy among family caregivers
Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease, say experts
Licensing deal marks coming of age for University of Washington, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Physician job satisfaction driven by quality of patient care

Subscribe to Latest Research Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)