RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
 Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Feb 19, 2013 - 1:22:36 AM
Research Article
Latest Research Channel

subscribe to Latest Research newsletter
Latest Research

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Frequently used weight-loss method is light on evidence

Oct 4, 2011 - 4:00:00 AM
One of the adverse outcomes noted by a single trial was that some people gained weight while using TTM SOC. None of the trials asked whether TTM SOC improved a person's health-related quality of life, or whether it reduced the risk of them getting ill. Also, none looked at the cost of taking patients through TTM SOC.

 
[RxPG] Although the transtheoretical model stages of change (TTM SOC) method is frequently used to help obese and overweight people lose weight, a newly published Cochrane systematic review indicates there is little evidence that it is effective. The use of TTM SOC only resulted in 2kg or less weight loss, and there was no conclusive evidence that this loss was sustained, says study leader Nik Tuah, who works at Imperial College London.

The transtheoretical model describes a step-by-step way in which individuals move from unhealthy behaviours to healthy ones. The model helps clinicians and patients by showing the sorts of benefits that can be expected for each step in the sequence. The five stages of change that the model anticipates are pre-contemplation, contemplation, preparation, action and maintenance.

A key assumption underlying this model is that people do not start off by being ready to change their behaviours, so any intervention that starts by asking for change is unlikely to be taken up, says Tuah. TTM SOC tries to overcome this by introducing stages that lead people to the place where they can see the need to change their behaviour and are willing to give it a go. Only then do you introduce the active interventions.

Leading a team of researchers, Tuah looked for studies that had investigated the effectiveness of TTM SOC. They identified five appropriate studies involving 1834 people who received an intervention and 2076 people who were placed in control groups. The trials varied in length from six weeks to 2 years. Drawing all the findings together showed that there was no convincing evidence that the intervention produced any significant sustainable weight loss. There was, however, some indication that when TTM SOC was combined with exercise and dieting, people's physical activity or eating habits did change a little.

One of the adverse outcomes noted by a single trial was that some people gained weight while using TTM SOC. None of the trials asked whether TTM SOC improved a person's health-related quality of life, or whether it reduced the risk of them getting ill. Also, none looked at the cost of taking patients through TTM SOC.

Given that obesity and overweight are such important issues, and that TTM SOC is so widely used, it is really important that we do more high quality randomised control trials, preferably with large numbers of people, and follow them for many years. Then we may get a better indication of how well it really works, says Tuah. This review does not necessarily challenge the notion that diet and exercise are effective weight loss strategies, but instead raises questions about how to approach lifestyle changes for individuals who want to adopt them.



Related Latest Research News
Bone loss associated with increased production of ROS
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
Crystal methamphetamine use by street youth increases risk of injecting drugs
Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease, say experts
Licensing deal marks coming of age for University of Washington, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Physician job satisfaction driven by quality of patient care
Book explores undiscovered economics of everyday life
Gene and stem cell therapy combination could aid wound healing
Solving the internet capacity crunch

Subscribe to Latest Research Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)