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Last Updated: Feb 19, 2013 - 1:22:36 AM
Research Article
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Physician-defined patient complexity differs from current diagnosis-based measures

Dec 23, 2011 - 5:00:00 AM , Reviewed by: Dr. Himanshu Tyagi
"In order to redesign our health care systems to more effectively care for complex patients, we need a better handle on exactly who they are. By asking primary care physicians about their experiences with their own patients in a systematic and quantitative way, we were able to bring out the importance of social and behavioral factors, in addition to specific medical problems. This work may help guide efforts to redesign health care systems so that we can deliver high quality, cost-effective care tailored to individual patient needs."

Level of Evidence
2b - Individual Cohort Study
Key Points of this article
Simply counting the number of co-morbid conditions does not really capture whether a patient is complex
 
Massachusetts General Hospital
Celebrating the 200th anniversary of its founding in 1811, Massachusetts General Hospital is the original and largest teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School. The MGH conducts the largest hospital-based research program in the United States, with an annual research budget of nearly $700 million and major research centers in AIDS, cardiovascular research, cancer, computational and integrative biology, cutaneous biology, human genetics, medical imaging, neurodegenerative disorders, reproductive biology, regenerative medicine, reproductive biology, systems biology, transplantation biology and photomedicine.
[RxPG] As Americans live longer with multiple medical conditions, managing their care is becoming increasingly challenging. Being able to define and measure patient complexity has important implications for how care is organized, how physicians and health care systems are paid, and how resources are allocated. In an article in the Dec. 20 Annals of Internal Medicine, a team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers report finding that primary care physicians define patient complexity using a broader range of factors – including mental health, social factors and financial issues – than do commonly used approaches based only on diagnoses and prior costs.

"Simply counting the number of co-morbid conditions does not really capture whether a patient is complex," explains Richard W. Grant, MD, MPH, the paper's lead author. "All primary care physicians can point to patients of theirs with very complicated medical histories who are relatively straightforward to manage, whereas other patients can be a real challenge despite relatively few medical diagnoses. Our results emphasize the importance of social and behavioral contexts that can create important barriers to delivering high-quality primary care."

The study enrolled 40 primary care physicians from 12 MGH-affiliated practices and community health centers. Participating physicians used a web-based tool to review a list of 120 of their own patients and indicated those who, in their view, were complex. For those complex patients, they were asked to indicate which of five domains – medical decision-making, coordinating care, mental health or substance abuse problems, health-related behaviors, and social or economic circumstances – were involved in that determination.

The authors found that primary care physicians designated about one-quarter of their patients as complex – with older, more experienced physicians and those working in community health centers reporting higher proportions of complex patients. Compared to non-complex patients, complex patients were older, more often women, and had more clinic visits to many different providers. Complex patients were also prescribed more medicines – including prescriptions for anti-psychotic medicines – were more likely to miss appointments, and were more likely to live in neighborhoods with lower income and educational levels. The authors then found that the results of physician assessment differed substantially from those of other common methods for assessing complexity.

"Managing complex patients requires greater clinician effort, increased health care resources, and substantial family and community support," says Grant, who recently joined the division of Research at Kaiser Permanente Northern California. "In order to redesign our health care systems to more effectively care for complex patients, we need a better handle on exactly who they are. By asking primary care physicians about their experiences with their own patients in a systematic and quantitative way, we were able to bring out the importance of social and behavioral factors, in addition to specific medical problems. This work may help guide efforts to redesign health care systems so that we can deliver high quality, cost-effective care tailored to individual patient needs."

Steven Atlas, MD, MPH, of the MGH Division of General Medicine, senior author of the Annals report, notes, "At MGH, we are using these results to develop new ways to identify complex patients that take into account the perspective of the primary care doctor."



Publication: Richard W. Grant, Jeffrey M. Ashburner, Clemens C. Hong, Yuchiao Chang, Michael J. Barry, and Steve J. Atlas Defining Patient Complexity From the Primary Care Physician's Perspective: A Cohort Study Ann Intern Med December 20, 2011 155:797-804; 
On the web: http://www.annals.org/content/155/12/797.abstract 

Funding information and declaration of competing interests: The study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and Partners Community HealthCare.
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 About Dr. Himanshu Tyagi
This news story has been reviewed by Dr. Himanshu Tyagi before its publication on RxPG News website. Dr. Himanshu Tyagi, MBBS MRCPsych is the founder editor and manager for RxPG News. In this position he is responsible for content development and overall website and editorial management functions. His areas of special interest are psychological therapies and evidence based journalism. He can be reached for corrections and feedback at himanshu.tyagi@rxpgnews.com
RxPG News is committed to promotion and implementation of Evidence Based Medical Journalism in all channels of mass media including internet.
 Additional information about the news article
Additional co-authors of the paper are Jeffrey Ashburner, MPH; Clemens Hong, MD, MPH; Yuchiao Chang, PhD, and Michael Barry, MD – all of the MGH Division of General Medicine.
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For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

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