RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
 Asian Health
 Food & Nutrition
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 World Healthcare
   Latest Research
 Alternative Medicine
 Clinical Trials
 Infectious Diseases
  Anorexia Nervosa
  Child Psychiatry
  Forensic Psychiatry
  Mood Disorders
  Peri-Natal Psychiatry
  Personality Disorders
   Behavioral Science
   Cognitive Science
  Sleep Disorders
  Substance Abuse
 Sports Medicine
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
   Special Topics
 Odd Medical News

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Psychology Channel

subscribe to Psychology newsletter
Latest Research : Psychiatry : Psychology

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
People more likely to help others they think are 'like them'

Jul 10, 2006 - 7:48:00 AM , Reviewed by: Himanshu Tyagi
About Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
For over 30 years, the official monthly journal of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP), Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (PSPB) has provided an international forum for the rapid dissemination of original empirical papers in all areas of personality and social psychology. SPSP counts more than 4,500 researchers, educators, and students in its membership worldwide. To contact the Executive Officer of SPSP, please phone David Dunning at (607) 255-6391, or email at [email protected] http://pspb.sagepub.com www.spsp.org

About SAGE
SAGE Publications is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets. Since 1965, SAGE has helped inform and educate a global community of scholars, practitioners, researchers, and students spanning a wide range of subject areas including business, humanities, social sciences, and science, technology and medicine. SAGE Publications, a privately owned corporation, has principal offices in Thousand Oaks, California, London, United Kingdom, and New Delhi, India.

[RxPG] Feelings of empathy lead to actions of helping – but only between members of the same group – according to a recent study. The research, led by Stefan Stürmer of the University of Kiel, is presented in the article "Empathy-Motivated Helping: The Moderating Role of Group Membership." The article discusses two different studies, one using a real-world, intercultural scenario and the other using a mixture of people with no obvious differences besides gender. Researchers concluded that, while all the people felt empathy for someone in distress, they only tended to assist if the needy person was viewed as a member of their own "in-group."

The first study, using a real-world intercultural scenario, split German and Muslim male participants into culturally-defined groups. When everyone learned that another participant was having difficulty finding housing, they all felt empathy for the other regardless of what group they were in. However, when asked about their intentions to help the participant, empathy had a stronger impact when the other was categorized as a member of their in-group.

To further substantiate the findings from the first study, the second study created "minimal" in-groups and out-groups using a mixture of male and female participants without obvious cultural differences. As in the first study, when participants learned that another participant needed financial help due to the loss of money and a credit card, they all felt empathy, but actual assistance was provided only when the distressed person was a member of their in-group.

Publication: July issue of Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, an official publication of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, published by SAGE Publications
On the web: www.sagepublications.com 

Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.

Related Psychology News
Self-affirmation may break down resistance to medical screening
Faster progress through puberty linked to behavior problems
Experience vital for complex decision-making
Decreased Dopamine processing ability - cause for high risk behaviour?
Stimulating scalp with weak current improves dexterity
Psychiatrist warns about impact of social networking sites
Study shows how context dictates what we believe we see
Loneliness could be bad for health
Do I know you? QBI researchers identify woman's struggle to recognize new faces
STAMP system can help medical professionals to predict violence

Subscribe to Psychology Newsletter

Enter your email address:

 Additional information about the news article
Research grants for these studies were provided by the National Institute of Mental Health and Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

Contact us

RxPG Online



    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)