RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
 Asian Health
 Food & Nutrition
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 World Healthcare
   Latest Research
 Alternative Medicine
 Clinical Trials
 Infectious Diseases
  Anorexia Nervosa
  Child Psychiatry
  Forensic Psychiatry
  Mood Disorders
  Peri-Natal Psychiatry
  Personality Disorders
   Bipolar Disorder
  Sleep Disorders
  Substance Abuse
 Sports Medicine
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
   Special Topics
 Odd Medical News

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Psychoses Channel

subscribe to Psychoses newsletter
Latest Research : Psychiatry : Psychoses

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Clozapine causes significantly higher rates of metabolic syndrome

Jul 1, 2006 - 4:37:00 PM , Reviewed by: Ankush Vidyarthi
"We need to raise the awareness of physicians about this issue so they monitor their patients and intervene promptly when required to prevent long-term adverse health consequences"

[RxPG] Patients who take clozapine, the most effective antipsychotic drug, have significantly higher rates of metabolic syndrome, according to a first-of-a-kind study by University of Rochester Medical Center researchers.

Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that increase the risk for heart disease, stroke and diabetes. The conditions include high blood pressure, excess body fat around the waist, abnormal levels of cholesterol and triglycerides and insulin resistance. Any one of the conditions increases the risk of serious disease. In combination, the risk grows greater.

More than half the clozapine patients studied had metabolic syndrome while only about 20 percent of those in a comparison group did, researchers report in the July issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry.

Patients with metabolic syndrome in this study would be expected to have a two-to-threefold increase in cardiovascular disease mortality, the Medical Center Department of Psychiatry researchers state.

"Clozapine is the last hope for many people," said J. Steven Lamberti, M.D., associate professor of psychiatry and lead author of the journal article. "But there are long-term health implications. This study suggests that patients who need the most effective medication are between a rock and a hard place."

The increased physical health risks must be balanced with the potential benefits of clozapine, the researchers conclude. In addition to its superior efficacy for patients resistant to conventional antipsychotic drugs, clozapine also is the only medication currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of suicidal behavior.

Physicians should monitor closely people who receive clozapine with regular tests for glucose and blood lipid levels, blood pressure and body weight, Lamberti said.

"We need to raise the awareness of physicians about this issue so they monitor their patients and intervene promptly when required to prevent long-term adverse health consequences," Lamberti said.

Lamberti and his fellow researchers studied 93 patients at the Medical Center's Department of Psychiatry who had been receiving clozapine for at least six months. The patients were weighed, measured and tested for diabetes, blood lipids and blood pressure. The researchers then compared the patients to a group of about 2,700 individuals from a national database of health information for thousands of Americans. The comparison group was matched for age, body mass, and race or ethnicity.

The researchers found that 53.8 percent of the clozapine patients had metabolic syndrome. But only 20.7 percent of the comparison group had the same syndrome.

Many studies have shown that clozapine is associated with weight gain, but this is the first study to describe clozapine's link to metabolic syndrome.

"People with schizophrenia are known to exercise less and have poor diets," Lamberti said. "Those factors contribute to metabolic syndrome. We can't say how much clozapine contributes to metabolic syndrome, but we have shown the high prevalence of the syndrome in those who take clozapine."

The National Institutes of Health initiated the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials for Intervention Effectiveness investigation to determine the comparative effectiveness of several drugs.

In one major study, the investigators compared clozapine to new antipsychotic drugs in a group of patients that had not improved with the new drugs. In April, the investigators reported that clozapine was significantly more effective than the new medications. Patients receiving clozapine were less likely to discontinue treatment than those on other drugs.

Because of the findings of this NIH-sponsored study, Lamberti expects a surge in the use of clozapine, a drug he said has been underutilized.

"With any increased use of clozapine, it becomes even more important to point out the need to closely monitor and treat patients who take the drug for metabolic syndrome and its consequences," Lamberti said.

Publication: July issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry
On the web: www.urmc.rochester.edu 

Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.

Related Psychoses News
Nicotine may be a treatment for some symptoms of schizophrenia
People With Schizophrenia Face Increased Risk Of Diabetes - Research
Genes behind bipolar disorder mapped by scientists
Brain recruiting pattern incorrect in Schizophrenic patients
Schizophrenia Risk Gene DISC1 Plays a Broader Role in the Development of Nervous System
First genome-wide study revealed genetic roots of bipolar illness
Chemical maps hint at drug's effects on schizophrenia
Diagnosis of Major Depression Might Mask Bipolar illness
Intensive psychotherapy more effective than brief therapy for treating bipolar depression
Study challenges idea that schizophrenia is distinct in developing and developed regions

Subscribe to Psychoses Newsletter

Enter your email address:

 Additional information about the news article
The Rochester study of clozapine and metabolic syndrome was supported by a grant from the Committee to Aid Research to End Schizophrenia.
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

Contact us

RxPG Online



    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)