RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
 Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Research Article
Latest Research Channel

subscribe to Latest Research newsletter
Latest Research

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
30 years on in the epicenter of the African AIDS epidemic

Nov 12, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM
The effects of HIV/AIDS are not as apparent with the simple clarity once assumed because so much else is going on in any society. For policymakers this research shows that they cannot focus on one aspect and assume everything can be attributed to that - too often HIV is reduced to a medical issue, but so much of what is going on is to do with social lives and behaviour, not just sexual behaviour. Resources often go to the medical and not the social support.

 
[RxPG] The impact of 30 years of HIV on an area once described as the epicentre of the African AIDS epidemic will be discussed at a lecture hosted by the University of East Anglia (UEA) in London this month.

Progressive declines in agricultural production, with dire consequences for rural livelihoods, were originally predicted as a result of the long-term effects of HIV and AIDS in central and south western Uganda. However, recent research has shown that those forecasts have not come true.

The lecture 30 years into the HIV epidemic in South West Uganda and the rural economy hasn't collapsed. What happened? takes place on November 25 at UEA London, ahead of World AIDS Day on December 1. Prof Janet Seeley, of the university's School of International Development, will report on research carried out over the last three decades that has looked in more depth at the impact of HIV-related infection and AIDS-related deaths on individuals, communities and livelihoods, in order to contribute to the design of policies and programmes that address the ongoing issues.

Prof Seeley, who has studied the effects of HIV/AIDS on rural communities in East Africa, in particular Uganda, for more than 20 years, will explore the reasons why rural livelihoods have proved to be much more resilient than had been expected in this region, and suggest lessons for forecasting.

In the mid 1980s south-western Uganda and north-western Tanzania were often referred to as the epicentre of the African AIDS epidemic. When first identified HIV/AIDS was of concern as a possible adverse factor in social and economic development because of its specific impact in the 15-50 age group.

The research carried out by Prof Seeley and colleagues Prof Tony Barnett, of the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Prof Stefan Dercon of the University of Oxford, has found that HIV/AIDS has sometimes thrown households into disarray and poverty, but more often it has reduced development and kept households poor.

People have undoubtedly suffered terrible personal loss and distress, but those who have survived have drawn on support from family and friends and from local organisations to rebuild livelihoods. People have shown resilience and managed, said Prof Seeley. For some the epidemic has been devastating but often on a household level families have adapted and the community as a whole has done better than expected. While there have been so many other crises, drought and crop failure for example, there have been new opportunities as well.

People have been changing occupations, diversifying, not necessarily because of HIV but because of diseases that have affected their crops and animals and pressures to earn a cash income. They haven't only had to face HIV/AIDS, they've had problems inflicted by drought, pests and other human disease.

However, Prof Seeley stresses that poverty remains, as does the endemic HIV disease, and that the health status of the population is poor and life remains hard.

The effects of HIV/AIDS are not as apparent with the simple clarity once assumed because so much else is going on in any society. For policymakers this research shows that they cannot focus on one aspect and assume everything can be attributed to that - too often HIV is reduced to a medical issue, but so much of what is going on is to do with social lives and behaviour, not just sexual behaviour. Resources often go to the medical and not the social support.

The challenge for development policy and implementation continues to be to find ways of addressing the persistent poverty and deprivation, which in part contributed to the particular manifestation of the AIDS epidemic in this region.




Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related Latest Research News
Drug activates virus against cancer
Bone loss associated with increased production of ROS
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
Crystal methamphetamine use by street youth increases risk of injecting drugs
Johns Hopkins-led study shows increased life expectancy among family caregivers
Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease, say experts
Licensing deal marks coming of age for University of Washington, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Physician job satisfaction driven by quality of patient care
Book explores undiscovered economics of everyday life

Subscribe to Latest Research Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)