RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
 Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Feb 19, 2013 - 1:22:36 AM
Research Article
Latest Research Channel

subscribe to Latest Research newsletter
Latest Research

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Aspirin: High or low dose following heart attack?

Mar 26, 2012 - 4:00:00 AM
The authors caution that because this is not a randomized study, there may be other treatment differences that could have affected the results and a randomized controlled trial would be needed to definitively establish that no difference existed in outcomes between aspirin dose regimens. These data are, however, consistent with previous reports.

 
[RxPG] Boston, MA- Each year, more than one million Americans suffer a heart attack and nearly all patients are prescribed a daily aspirin and an antiplatelet medication during recovery. However, the optimal aspirin dose has been unclear. Now, new research from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) reports that there is no significant difference between high versus low dose aspirin in the prevention of recurring cardiovascular events in patients who suffer from acute coronary syndromes (ACS), which are characterized by symptoms related to obstruction in coronary arteries, which supply blood to the heart. These findings are presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions on March 24, 2012.

We observed no difference between patients taking a high dose versus a low of aspirin as it relates to cardiovascular death, heart attack, stroke or stent thrombosis, said Payal Kohli, MD, cardiology fellow at BWH and researcher in the TIMI Study Group, who is the lead author on this study. Interestingly, we did find a dramatic difference in practice patterns of physicians in North America compared to those in the rest of the world, Kohli said. North American physicians prescribed a high dose of aspirin for two-thirds of all their patients, while the exact reverse was true of the rest of the world. International physicians prescribed a low dose of aspirin to more than two-thirds of their patients.

Dr. Stephen D. Wiviott, a cardiologist at BWH and researcher in the TIMI Study Group, is the senior author on the study.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 11000 patients from around the world that were enrolled in the TRITON-TIMI 38 trial, which randomized ACS patients to receive either clopidigrel or prasugrel, two different antiplatelet medications. Some patients were prescribed high doses of aspirin following a heart attack, while others, low doses. The aspirin dose was prescribed at the clinician investigator's discretion and the analysis included 7,106 patients who received low dose aspirin, defined as 150 mg or less, and 4,610 patients who received high dose aspirin, defined as 150 mg or more. Researchers reported that there was no significant difference observed in the prevention of the combination of heart attack, stroke, cardiovascular death or the prevention of stent thrombosis between the groups that received high or low dose aspirin. Prasugrel was more effective at preventing major adverse cardiovascular events than clopidogrel, regardless of whether patients received low or high dose aspirin.

Researchers also present that patients who received high dose aspirin were more likely to have more cardiac risk factors and have higher cholesterol. Patients who received low dose aspirin were more likely to be white and have no prior history of high blood pressure.

The authors caution that because this is not a randomized study, there may be other treatment differences that could have affected the results and a randomized controlled trial would be needed to definitively establish that no difference existed in outcomes between aspirin dose regimens. These data are, however, consistent with previous reports.

The authors reinforce that all medication changes should be made only after discussion with your physician.



Related Latest Research News
Drug activates virus against cancer
Bone loss associated with increased production of ROS
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
Crystal methamphetamine use by street youth increases risk of injecting drugs
Johns Hopkins-led study shows increased life expectancy among family caregivers
Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease, say experts
Licensing deal marks coming of age for University of Washington, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Physician job satisfaction driven by quality of patient care
Book explores undiscovered economics of everyday life

Subscribe to Latest Research Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)