RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
 Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Research Article
Latest Research Channel

subscribe to Latest Research newsletter
Latest Research

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Moving an active gene from the interior of the nucleus can silence genes , preventing their transcription . scientists report .

Feb 14, 2008 - 4:00:00 AM
Not only were selected test genes that served as markers turned off after being attached to the inner nuclear membrane, but also nearby real genes.

Key Points of this article
Attachment to the inner nuclear membrane, they show, can silence genes, preventing their transcription
next step is to design an experiment that could test causality.
 
Main results
Not only were selected test genes that served as markers turned off after being attached to the inner nuclear membrane, but also nearby real genes.
[RxPG] Moving an active gene from the interior of the nucleus to its periphery can inactivate that gene report scientists from the University of Chicago Medical Center .


Attachment to the inner nuclear membrane, they show, can silence genes, preventing their transcription--a novel form of gene regulation.


Several years ago, we and others described the correlation between nuclear positioning and gene activation, said study author Harinder Singh, Louis Block Professor of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology and an Investigator in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of Chicago.


With that in mind, we wanted to take the next step, to design an experiment that could test causality. Could we move a gene from the center of the nucleus to the periphery, we asked, and then measure the consequences of such repositioning?


In mammalian nuclei, chromatin--a complex of DNA and associated proteins--is organized into structural domains through interactions with distinct nuclear compartments. In this study, the authors developed the molecular tools to take specific genes from these interior compartments, move them to the periphery and attach them to the nuclear membrane--which turned those genes off.


Not only were selected test genes that served as markers turned off after being attached to the inner nuclear membrane, but also nearby real genes the scientists quoted.







On the web:  

Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related Latest Research News
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease, say experts
Licensing deal marks coming of age for University of Washington, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Physician job satisfaction driven by quality of patient care
Book explores undiscovered economics of everyday life
Gene and stem cell therapy combination could aid wound healing
Solving the internet capacity crunch
Breathing new life into preterm baby research
Perceptions of the role of the state shape water services provision

Subscribe to Latest Research Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)