RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
 Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Research Article
Latest Research Channel

subscribe to Latest Research newsletter
Latest Research

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Nearly 90 percent of babies receive recommended newborn screening tests

Jul 10, 2007 - 4:00:00 AM
This is the fifth consecutive year the March of Dimes has analyzed state-by-state newborn screening requirements, creating a snapshot of the nation’s progress toward improving the health of newborns. The March of Dimes contracted with the National Newborn Screening and Genetics Resource Center to survey each state’s newborn screening requirements.

 
[RxPG] WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., JULY 11, 2007 – Nearly 90 percent of all babies born in the United States – more than double the percentage in 2005 – live in states that require screening for at least 21 life-threatening disorders, according to the latest March of Dimes Newborn Screening Report Card.

The March of Dimes endorsed the 2004 report of the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG) that calls for every baby born in the U.S. to be screened for 29 genetic or functional disorders. If diagnosed early, all of these devastating conditions can be successfully managed or treated to prevent severe consequences.

Two years ago, only 38 percent of infants were born in states that required screening for at least 21 of these 29 core conditions. As a result of four years of intensive advocacy efforts by March of Dimes chapters and their partners, that percentage has increased to 87.5, or about 3.6 million babies.

“While this important expansion of newborn screening is very good news for families, the lives of 500,000 newborns who still aren’t tested hang in the balance,” said Dr. Jennifer L. Howse, president of the March of Dimes. “Despite the pleas of parents, clinicians and advocacy groups the United States still lacks consistent federal guidelines for newborn screening. Babies must be screened, to receive immediate treatment necessary to survive and lead healthy lives. The lack of federal guidelines makes it difficult for states to get support for needed legislation.”

In states that do not follow the ACMG recommendations, the March of Dimes staff and volunteers continue to work with governors, legislatures, and parent groups to advocate for expanded newborn screening on a state-by-state basis.

In Pennsylvania, newborn screening is offered at most hospitals, but it is not required by law. Therefore it is not a guarantee and, potentially, screening could be eliminated or reduced.

Massachusetts had been a leader in newborn screening when, in the early 1960s, it became the first state to routinely screen all newborns for PKU (phenylketonuria), an inherited metabolic disorder that, if untreated, causes severe mental retardation. But today Massachusetts requires screening for only 12 of the 29 core conditions.

Nationwide, a discouraging 6.1 percent of babies are born in states that required screening for only 10 to 20 of the core conditions and 6.2 percent of newborns will get screening for fewer than 10 conditions. Disparities in state newborn screening programs mean some babies may die or develop brain damage or other severe complications because they are not identified in time for effective treatment, said Dr. Howse.

“All babies across America should receive the benefits of being screened for all of these 29 treatable conditions,” said Dr. Howse.

At present, 13 states and the District of Columbia require screening for all 29 core, treatable, conditions. While most states are working to meet that goal, Montana, Kansas and West Virginia, enacted legislation this year requiring all babies be screened for all of the core conditions. Their programs will be implemented next year.

Other states overcame remarkable challenges in order to provide for the health of their smallest citizens. For example, Louisiana, which still is recovering from the devastating hurricanes of 2005, requires screening for 28 of the core conditions.

This is the fifth consecutive year the March of Dimes has analyzed state-by-state newborn screening requirements, creating a snapshot of the nation’s progress toward improving the health of newborns. The March of Dimes contracted with the National Newborn Screening and Genetics Resource Center to survey each state’s newborn screening requirements.

The snapshot shows that the nation is on target to meet the March of Dimes goal of having all babies screened for 20 or more of the recommended panel of genetic disorders by 2008.




Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related Latest Research News
Drug activates virus against cancer
Bone loss associated with increased production of ROS
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
Crystal methamphetamine use by street youth increases risk of injecting drugs
Johns Hopkins-led study shows increased life expectancy among family caregivers
Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease, say experts
Licensing deal marks coming of age for University of Washington, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Physician job satisfaction driven by quality of patient care
Book explores undiscovered economics of everyday life

Subscribe to Latest Research Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)