RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
 Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Research Article
Latest Research Channel

subscribe to Latest Research newsletter
Latest Research

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
New research to unravel how nutrients drive toxic 'brown tides' on East Coast

Sep 16, 2009 - 4:00:00 AM
The ability to monitor individual genes from brown tide cells that are 'turned on or off' in response to nutrients is a breakthrough that can show us precisely which nutrient conditions foster the growth of brown tide cells in nature, said principal investigator Sonya Dyhrman, Ph.D., of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. It is difficult to track how nutrient type and supply influence harmful algal blooms because most of the approaches examine all species in the environment, rather than one specific harmful species.

 
[RxPG] NOAA has awarded Massachusetts-based Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution $120,000 as part of an anticipated three-year, nearly $500,000 project, to determine how nitrogen and phosphorus promote brown tides on the East Coast. Funds were awarded through the interagency Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) program.

The project will focus on brown tides, a type of algae along the East Coast that causes tremendous damage to coastal habitats and scallop and hard clam fisheries from Rhode Island to Virginia. Researchers plan to use genome technology to examine how these nutrient pollutants may cause a brown tide event and influence its duration.

In the late 1980s, brown tide caused the collapse of the multi-million dollar scallop industry on eastern Long Island and mass die-offs of seagrass in its bays, said Christopher Gobler, Ph.D, a brown tide expert from the State University of New York at Stony Brook who is involved in the project. Blooms have continued since then with damage extending to New York's largest fishery which harvests the northern quahog, or hard clam. Unfortunately, these blooms were so damaging, the fisheries and resources have never recovered.

Brown tides are unusual since they grow when a certain type of inorganic nitrogen is in low supply. As such, it is suspected that an excess of other nutrient types, mainly organic phosphorus and nitrogen, in aquatic ecosystems contributes to the development of brown tides. Determining which nutrient conditions trigger these blooms will help predict and prevent brown tides. Knowing the genome sequence of the brown tide organism also allows researchers to observe changes in the cell's genes as conditions change.

The ability to monitor individual genes from brown tide cells that are 'turned on or off' in response to nutrients is a breakthrough that can show us precisely which nutrient conditions foster the growth of brown tide cells in nature, said principal investigator Sonya Dyhrman, Ph.D., of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. It is difficult to track how nutrient type and supply influence harmful algal blooms because most of the approaches examine all species in the environment, rather than one specific harmful species.

This project is timely as the state of New York is currently developing a nutrient management strategy for our estuaries, said Karen Chytalo, Section Chief of Marine Habitat Protection of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. The type of detailed information this project will provide is exactly what we need to develop estuarine nutrient criteria so that, ultimately, we can prevent these damaging events and improve the overall health of our estuaries.




Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related Latest Research News
Drug activates virus against cancer
Bone loss associated with increased production of ROS
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
Crystal methamphetamine use by street youth increases risk of injecting drugs
Johns Hopkins-led study shows increased life expectancy among family caregivers
Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease, say experts
Licensing deal marks coming of age for University of Washington, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Physician job satisfaction driven by quality of patient care
Book explores undiscovered economics of everyday life

Subscribe to Latest Research Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)