RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
 Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Research Article
Latest Research Channel

subscribe to Latest Research newsletter
Latest Research

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Nutrition researchers to develop new growth charts for children with Down syndrome

Apr 22, 2010 - 4:00:00 AM
Under the grant, Zemel and colleagues will recruit approximately 600 children with Down syndrome, from birth to 20 years old, from Southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. In regularly scheduled follow-up visits, the researchers will measure the patients' growth and body dimensions and collect data about their health, dietary patterns and physical activities.

 
[RxPG] Parents and doctors have known for a long time that children with Down syndrome tend to grow more slowly and are considerably shorter than most other children. But pediatricians needing to record growth milestones at regular office visits have an outdated set of growth charts based on data collected more than 25 years ago. Since that time, there have been major advances in the medical care of children with Down syndrome. In addition, the demographics of the general U.S. population have changed, and children are taller, but also more overweight.

Now researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will be measuring children with Down syndrome from birth to age 21 to develop updated growth charts. A four-year, $1.2 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is supporting this effort, which brings together experts from the Hospital in growth and nutrition, Down syndrome (also called trisomy 21), and general pediatrics.

One of the most common birth defects, Down syndrome occurs in approximately one in 700 births. The National Down Syndrome Society estimates that there are more than 400,000 people living with Down syndrome in the U.S. It is a genetic disorder, usually resulting from having three copies of chromosome 21, instead of the usual two copies.

Because the extra chromosome generally occurs in every cell in the body, it can affect many different systems, causing congenital heart disease, recurrent ear and sinus infections, hearing loss, thyroid disorders, visual impairment, and gastrointestinal disorders. Neurological effects include developmental disability, which can range from low-average abilities to severe intellectual impairment.

The past 20 years have seen significant improvements in the care of children with Down syndrome, accompanied by longer life expectancy, said the grant's principal investigator, Babette S. Zemel, Ph.D., director of the Nutrition and Growth Laboratory at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. We believe that children with Down syndrome are growing better now than they were 20 years ago. We also want to look at how they are growing throughout childhood, from infancy to young adulthood, at how body mass index changes across time, and how that relates to body fat composition.

If we can better understand the growth patterns and the rates of other illnesses that co-occur with Down syndrome, researchers may be better able to plan treatment and design preventive health programs, added Zemel. The CDC has recognized updated growth charts as an important tool for people providing health care to children with Down syndrome. In its grant guidelines, the CDC states that new growth charts produced from the study will be broadly distributed free of charge.

Under the grant, Zemel and colleagues will recruit approximately 600 children with Down syndrome, from birth to 20 years old, from Southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. In regularly scheduled follow-up visits, the researchers will measure the patients' growth and body dimensions and collect data about their health, dietary patterns and physical activities.

In addition to developing more representative growth charts, we also expect to better understand what factors may contribute to growth-related problems in children with Down syndrome, added Zemel. Another important goal is to develop a screening tool for identifying children at risk for overweight and obesity, which are common concerns for adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome.




Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related Latest Research News
How do consumers see a product when they hear music?
Drug activates virus against cancer
Bone loss associated with increased production of ROS
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
Crystal methamphetamine use by street youth increases risk of injecting drugs
Johns Hopkins-led study shows increased life expectancy among family caregivers
Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease, say experts
Licensing deal marks coming of age for University of Washington, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Physician job satisfaction driven by quality of patient care

Subscribe to Latest Research Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)