RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
 Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Research Article
Latest Research Channel

subscribe to Latest Research newsletter
Latest Research

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Seniors with vocal problems want treatment but aren't getting it

Sep 23, 2008 - 4:00:00 AM
Cohen says part of the problem may be under-recognition. Primary care physicians are currently managing the many medical conditions elderly people routinely face, and may not be discussing voice and swallowing problems with their patients. Regardless, Cohen says the Duke data shows that needs to change.

 
[RxPG] DURHAM, N.C. -- The breathy, hoarse voice of senior citizens is often thought to be a normal sign of aging. But doctors at the Duke Voice Care Center say that's a false perception that needs to change. And they've discovered that it may partially explain why seniors who want treatment for the condition aren't seeking it.

That's a problem, added Seth Cohen, M.D., a Duke otolaryngologist and the study's lead author, because voice and swallowing concerns can lead to serious quality of life issues including anxiety, depression and social withdrawal.

Nearly 20 percent of the 248 octogenarians studied by the Duke researchers had dysphonia, the medical term for hoarseness, weakness or loss of voice. Fourteen percent had dysphagia or painful swallowing. Approximately three-quarters of the respondents (77.6% for dysphonia and 79.4% for dysphasia) had not sought treatment, even though more than half (55.9%) expressed interest in getting help.

Voice and swallowing issues are serious concerns and people who want medical care are not getting it, says Cohen of the research presented at the 2008 annual meeting of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery in Chicago, IL. Is it because they have so many medical problems and these issues are getting pushed aside or overlooked? We don't know. What we do know is these medical concerns have a huge impact on quality of life, and more people should be aware of the treatments available and be able to obtain help.

Previous studies have reported that nearly one-fourth of elderly individuals believe vocal and swallowing problems are a normal part of aging, a perception found to be even more common among those who actually suffer. The Duke physicians surmise that this may lead some elderly people to accept their difficulties and not seek treatment.

Half of those surveyed were unaware that treatment existed. This is a concern, says Cohen, because symptoms of depression were found to be more common among those affected. And, previous studies have reported a connection between the conditions and increased depression, anxiety and social withdrawal.

Cohen says part of the problem may be under-recognition. Primary care physicians are currently managing the many medical conditions elderly people routinely face, and may not be discussing voice and swallowing problems with their patients. Regardless, Cohen says the Duke data shows that needs to change.

Our results highlight the need for better education of the general public and, primary care providers, Cohen said. Whether this effort leads to increased awareness and/or better outcomes for these patients is the basis of further study. But for now, we know these problems have a significant negative impact on quality of life, and obtaining appropriate treatment can make a big difference.




Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related Latest Research News
Drug activates virus against cancer
Bone loss associated with increased production of ROS
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
Crystal methamphetamine use by street youth increases risk of injecting drugs
Johns Hopkins-led study shows increased life expectancy among family caregivers
Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease, say experts
Licensing deal marks coming of age for University of Washington, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Physician job satisfaction driven by quality of patient care
Book explores undiscovered economics of everyday life

Subscribe to Latest Research Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)