RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
 Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Research Article
Latest Research Channel

subscribe to Latest Research newsletter
Latest Research

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
'Vast majority' of acoustic tumor patients benefit from surgery

Dec 7, 2010 - 5:00:00 AM
Anderson said Leonetti is a very innovative surgeon, and extremely adept at the myriad of approaches to the skull base. He also has a wonderful attitude -- highly professional but also fun to work with.

 
[RxPG] MAYWOOD, Ill. -- Surgery to remove tumors under the brain known as acoustic neuromas produces favorable outcomes in the vast majority of patients, according to one of the largest studies of its kind.

Loyola University Hospital surgeons Dr. Douglas Anderson and Dr. John Leonetti followed 730 patients whom they had jointly operated on during a 21-year period. Patients ranged in age from 9 to 79, with a median age of 48. The average clinical followup was 32 months.

Every patient survived the surgery, and the surgeons were able to completely remove the tumors in 95.1 percent of the patients. Ninety percent of patients experienced little or no facial paralysis. And among those who still retained hearing in the affected ear before surgery, 44 percent came out of the surgery with useful hearing in that ear, and 63 percent had at least some hearing.

These results are as good as or better than any other series of acoustic neuromas reported in the medical literature.

With careful microsurgical technique, one can achieve gross total resection [removal] of the vast majority of acoustic tumors with minimal major morbidity or mortality and at the same time, achieve a high percentage of normal to near normal facial function, the study authors concluded.

Anderson is first author of the study. He presented results at the 2010 Congress of Neurological Surgeons, which awarded him the prestigious Synthes Skull Base Surgery Award.

An acoustic neuroma, also known as a vestibular schwannoma, is a slow-growing, usually benign tumor, located behind the ear on the nerve that connects the ear to the brain. The tumor can cause hearing loss in one ear and paralysis on one side of the face. If the tumor grows large enough, it can be fatal. Treatment options include microsurgery (surgery with a microscope), radiation or simply keeping a watchful eye on the tumor.

In the study, the average tumor diameter was 2.2 cm, and 89.5 percent of the patients had experienced partial or complete loss of hearing in one ear. Other pre-surgery symptoms included tinnitus (43.7 percent of patients), dizziness/imbalance (26.8 percent), facial numbness (11.1 percent), headache (10.3 percent) and facial weakness (2.6 percent).

Leonetti and Anderson work as a team, with Leonetti gaining access to the tumor and Anderson removing it. If the patient still retains hearing, Leonetti uses one of two surgical techniques, called the retrosigmoid approach or the middle fossa approach. If the patient has lost all hearing, Leonetti uses a technique called the translabyrinthine approach. Leonetti is a professor in the departments of Otolaryngology and Neurological Surgery and program director of Cranial Base Surgery, and Anderson is a professor in the Department of Neurological Surgery at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

In recent years, the adoption of techniques to monitor neural structures during surgery has enabled surgeons to frequently preserve hearing and facial nerves. Before, the goal simply was to get the tumor out and be glad if the patient survived, Anderson said.

While Anderson and Leonetti have their own practices, they also collaborate to remove acoustic neuromas and other tumors. Over the past 23 years, they have performed about 1,250 surgeries together.

It's been a long and successful partnership, Anderson said. We have had wonderful results. It's like a nice marriage.

Anderson said Leonetti is a very innovative surgeon, and extremely adept at the myriad of approaches to the skull base. He also has a wonderful attitude -- highly professional but also fun to work with.

Leonetti also has high praise for Anderson. He is the most technically gifted neurosurgeon I have ever seen, Leonetti said. More importantly, he is a kind, compassionate and wonderful person -- but he'll never beat me at golf.




Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related Latest Research News
Drug activates virus against cancer
Bone loss associated with increased production of ROS
Sound preconditioning prevents ototoxic drug-induced hearing loss in mice
Crystal methamphetamine use by street youth increases risk of injecting drugs
Johns Hopkins-led study shows increased life expectancy among family caregivers
Moderate to severe psoriasis linked to chronic kidney disease, say experts
Licensing deal marks coming of age for University of Washington, University of Alabama-Birmingham
Simple blood or urine test to identify blinding disease
Physician job satisfaction driven by quality of patient care
Book explores undiscovered economics of everyday life

Subscribe to Latest Research Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)