RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
  Medicare
 World Healthcare
 
   Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
USA Channel

subscribe to USA newsletter
Healthcare : USA

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Trauma-Center Care Lowers Risk of Death

Jan 26, 2006 - 4:45:00 PM , Reviewed by: Priya Saxena
“This study provides convincing evidence that care at a level 1 trauma center saves lives”

 
[RxPG] Care at a trauma center lowers by 25 percent the risk of death for injured patients compared to treatment received at non-trauma centers, according to the results of a nationwide study conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Washington School of Medicine. “A National Evaluation of the Effect of Trauma Center Care on Mortality,” to be published in the January 26, 2006, edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, is among the first studies to provide strong evidence of the effectiveness of specialized trauma-care facilities.

“Hospitals have difficulty justifying the expense of maintaining trauma centers without strong evidence of their effectiveness. Now we have conclusive data to show that trauma care is effective,” said the study’s lead author, Ellen J. MacKenzie, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. “The findings of this study argue strongly for continued efforts at regionalizing trauma care at the state and local levels to assure that patients who suffer serious injuries get to a trauma center where they are afforded the best possible care.”

The National Study on the Costs and Outcomes of Trauma analyzed the outcomes of 5,190 adult trauma patients who received treatment at 18 level 1 trauma centers (the highest level of care) and 51 non-trauma centers. The researchers also analyzed the characteristics of each hospital, such as the number of patients treated and types of specialty services available.

After adjusting for factors such as severity of injury, patient age and pre-existing medical conditions, the researchers found a 25 percent overall decrease in the risk of death following care in a trauma center compared to receiving care at a non-trauma center. The adjusted in-hospital death rate was 7.6 percent for patients treated at trauma centers compared to 9.5 percent for patients treated at non-trauma facilities. The mortality rate one year following the injury was 10.4 percent for patients at trauma centers compared to 13.8 percent for patients at non-trauma centers.

The researchers noted that the effect of treatment at trauma centers was less significant among older patients with underlying health problems.

“This study provides convincing evidence that care at a level 1 trauma center saves lives,” said Gregory Jurkovich, MD, a University of Washington professor of surgery and a co-author of the study. “Our next step is to see if level 1 trauma center care also improves the quality of life of trauma survivors. We’ll examine the differences in functional outcome and cost of care between level 1 trauma centers and non-trauma centers.”

Caring for the acutely injured is a major public health issue and involves bystanders and community members, health care professionals and health care systems. “This research provides state and community leaders with crucial information, so that they can make sound decisions regarding their trauma systems and the care that people receive after they are injured. It is one way that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention contributes to reducing premature death and disability through research and partnerships,” said Richard C. Hunt, MD, director of the CDC’s Injury Center’s Division of Injury Response.



Publication: January 26, 2006 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine
On the web: content.nejm.org 

Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related USA News
Measles, Mumps make a comeback in US
India adds spice to US life, keeps it healthy
Fitness club memberships help insurance plans to enrol healthier patients
White children far more likely to receive CT scans than Hispanic, African-American children
Daunting barriers found in accessing psychiatric care
Obama names Indian American health researcher White House Fellow
Indian American helps design vaginal ring to prevent HIV transmission
US Senate approves sweeping tobacco legislation
Hacker demands $10 mn ransom for stolen medical records
Nearly Half of Primary Care Doctors in US Would Like to Quit

Subscribe to USA Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Additional information about the news article
Funding for the study was provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Injury Prevention and Control and the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging.

Additional study authors are Frederick P. Rivara, MD, MPH, and Avery B. Nathens, MD, PhD, from the University of Washington School of Medicine; and Katherine P. Frey, MPH, Brian L. Egleston, MPP, David S. Salkever, PhD, and Daniel O. Scharfstein, ScD, from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)