RxPG News Feed for RxPG News

Medical Research Health Special Topics World
  Home
 
   Health
 Aging
 Asian Health
 Events
 Fitness
 Food & Nutrition
 Happiness
 Men's Health
 Mental Health
 Occupational Health
 Parenting
 Public Health
 Sleep Hygiene
 Women's Health
 
   Healthcare
 Africa
 Australia
 Canada Healthcare
 China Healthcare
 India Healthcare
 New Zealand
 South Africa
 UK
 USA
 World Healthcare
 
   Latest Research
 Aging
 Alternative Medicine
 Anaethesia
  Resuscitation
 Biochemistry
 Biotechnology
 Cancer
 Cardiology
 Clinical Trials
 Cytology
 Dental
 Dermatology
 Embryology
 Endocrinology
 ENT
 Environment
 Epidemiology
 Gastroenterology
 Genetics
 Gynaecology
 Haematology
 Immunology
 Infectious Diseases
 Medicine
 Metabolism
 Microbiology
 Musculoskeletal
 Nephrology
 Neurosciences
 Obstetrics
 Ophthalmology
 Orthopedics
 Paediatrics
 Pathology
 Pharmacology
 Physiology
 Physiotherapy
 Psychiatry
 Radiology
 Rheumatology
 Sports Medicine
 Surgery
 Toxicology
 Urology
 
   Medical News
 Awards & Prizes
 Epidemics
 Launch
 Opinion
 Professionals
 
   Special Topics
 Ethics
 Euthanasia
 Evolution
 Feature
 Odd Medical News
 Climate

Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Research Article
Anaethesia Channel

subscribe to Anaethesia newsletter
Latest Research : Anaethesia

   EMAIL   |   PRINT
Study finds 'wake up and breathe' strategy allows patients to come off ventilator sooner

May 22, 2007 - 10:03:00 AM , Reviewed by: Dr. Priya Saxena
The patients in the SAT+SBT group were able to breathe without the ventilator?s assistance an average of three days more and were discharged from the ICU and hospital an average of four days earlier than the SBT group. During the 28-day study, 47 patients in the SAT+SBT group died compared with 58 in the SBT group.

 
[RxPG] A new study of intensive care unit patients who are breathing with the help of a mechanical ventilator has found that a two-step sedation and ventilator weaning protocol?called a ?wake up and breathe? strategy?helps patients come off the ventilator faster so that they can be discharged from the ICU and hospital more quickly. The study is being presented at the American Thoracic Society 2007 International Conference in San Francisco.

?On average, patients managed with the intervention spent four more days alive and out of the ICU and out of the hospital than those managed in the control group,? explained senior author Wes Ely, M.D., M.P.H., Professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University and Associate Director of the Geriatric Research Education and Clinic Center.

In the first step of the protocol, the patient?s sedation is turned off, also known as a ?spontaneous awakening trial.? ?Almost all patients on a ventilator in the ICU receive sedating medications that keep them comfortable or even comatose,? says the study?s first author, Timothy Girard, M.D., M.S.C.I., also of the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville. ?The spontaneous awakening trial (SAT) allows them to wake up, so we can find out if they are ready to proceed without sedation. If the patient is uncomfortable, we restart sedation, but a lot of patients are comfortable enough to proceed with the next step in the protocol.?

This second step involves allowing the patient to try breathing on their own without substantial help from the ventilator, called a ?spontaneous breathing trial.? If the patient shows signs they are unable to breathe on their own, they are immediately placed back on full mechanical ventilation.

The multicenter study included 335 critically ill patients in four hospitals who were receiving mechanical ventilation. Patients managed with the combined ?wake up and breathe? protocol (the SAT + SBT group) were compared with patients who were managed with daily spontaneous breathing trials and usual sedation practices (the SBT group). This group did not undergo formal awakening trials; their sedation was managed by their ICU doctors and nurses on a case-by-case basis.

The patients in the SAT+SBT group were able to breathe without the ventilator?s assistance an average of three days more and were discharged from the ICU and hospital an average of four days earlier than the SBT group. During the 28-day study, 47 patients in the SAT+SBT group died compared with 58 in the SBT group.

?Numbers on the monitor in the ICU aren?t very good at predicting if a patient is ready to come off a ventilator,? Dr. Girard says. ?In the past, the process of turning sedation drugs off has been done separately from turning off the ventilator. Our study proved our hypothesis that if we connect these two processes, it will safely allow patients to come off the ventilator earlier.?




Advertise in this space for $10 per month. Contact us today.


Related Anaethesia News
Anaesthesia not harmful for babies during birth
Increased suggestibility may help in pain-relieving effects of nitrous oxide
FDA warning against droperidol unnecessary - Mayo Clinic study concludes
Study finds 'wake up and breathe' strategy allows patients to come off ventilator sooner
Potential new pain killer drug developed by scientists at Leicester and Italy
Near infrared laser device can measure brain oxygen levels
Hospital characteristics play a role in use of do-not-resuscitate orders
Latest Data on Novel Short-acting Sedatives
Org 25969 - the First Selective Relaxant Binding Agent for Neuromuscular Block Reversal Enters Phase 3
Dangerous reduction in Oxygen levels during Air Travel

Subscribe to Anaethesia Newsletter

Enter your email address:


 Feedback
For any corrections of factual information, to contact the editors or to send any medical news or health news press releases, use feedback form

Top of Page

 
Contact us

RxPG Online

Nerve

 

    Full Text RSS

© All rights reserved by RxPG Medical Solutions Private Limited (India)