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Last Updated: Oct 11, 2012 - 10:22:56 PM
Meta Analysis
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Latest Research : Surgery : CTVS

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Off-pump CABG is a safer option

Feb 5, 2007 - 5:45:37 AM , Reviewed by: Dr. Rashmi Yadav
“If the surgeons are skilled enough to perform the surgery without stopping the heart, it can be offered to high-risk patients who would not be likely to survive the side effects of the traditional stopped-heart method."

Key Points of this article
Performing the surgery on the beating heart, while more technically challenging for the surgeon, keeps these side effects low and allows for a quicker recovery.
 
[RxPG] According to a review of the latest clinical trials, coronary artery bypass surgery performed on a beating heart, without the aid of a heart-lung machine, is a safe option that leads to fewer negative side effects for bypass patients. This review is featured in Journal of Cardiac Surgery.


“Previously, it was more common for doctors to perform artery bypass surgery on the heart by stopping the heart and passing the blood through a heart-lung machine,” says author Dr. Shahzad Raja. “However, this process frequently leads to ‘whole body inflammation,’ which includes complications such as brain swelling, heart arrhythmia and infections.” According to Raja, performing the surgery on the beating heart, while more technically challenging for the surgeon, keeps these side effects low and allows for a quicker recovery.


“If the surgeons are skilled enough to perform the surgery without stopping the heart, it can be offered to high-risk patients who would not be likely to survive the side effects of the traditional stopped-heart method,” says Raja. “For this reason, quality training needs to be provided for those surgeons who wish to offer this option to their patients.”




Publication: Journal of Cardiac Surgery 
On the web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/jcs 

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Nesiritide may be beneficial in the prevention of renal dysfunction after CABG
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Off-pump CABG is a safer option
Off-pump CABG is a safer option

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 Additional information about the news article
Dr. Shahzad Raja is a surgeon with the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the Western Infirmary in Glasgow, Scotland. He can be reached for questions at [email protected]

The Journal of Cardiac Surgery (JCS) is a peer-reviewed, international publication devoted to contemporary surgical treatment of cardiac disease. Renowned for its detailed "how to" methods, JCS provides well-illustrated, concise technical articles, critical reviews and commentaries that are highly valued by dedicated readers worldwide. For more information, please visit www.blackwellpublishing.com/jcs.

Blackwell Publishing is the world’s leading society publisher, partnering with 665 medical, academic, and professional societies. Blackwell publishes over 800 journals and has over 6,000 books in print. The company employs over 1,000 staff members in offices in the US, UK, Australia, China, Singapore, Denmark, Germany, and Japan. Blackwell’s mission as an expert publisher is to create long-term partnerships with our clients that enhance learning, disseminate research, and improve the quality of professional practice. For more information on Blackwell Publishing, please visit www.blackwellpublishing.com or www.blackwell-synergy.com.
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